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2004 4.7L V8. stock

I've had this idea in my head, and Im not even sure if its a good one.

Installing a "high flow" intake from like K&N or the sorts.
blocking it off from the engine bay.
and installing a working scoop in the hood at the front right side (were all the filters seem to sit).

My theory is that it may work as a simple "ram" air system (more high alt Colorado air at the filter then normal stock).
and im a sucker for originality and I think an off set scoop may look kinda cool.

headers and exhaust at some point too even tho I'd rather supercharge her.
but we know how easy those are to get ahold of.
 

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Im sure it would work pretty good, but i feel like it will look like a Honda on crack.

I would suggest using a scoop under the bumper somewhere and running the intake piping towards the bottom so the scoop can work that way.
 

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I like your thinking but it won't yield any significant gains. There are a few problems, if you essentially chamber the air filter by boxing it and add a scoop to force feed it, the motor will still only pull what it needs as far as air volume. In other words you can only fill the airbox with the volume of air that fits, any excess will simply blow by, kind of like a cup overflowing. Another issue is that this will only start to work at high speeds, at which point your trucks air resistance is countering any subtle effects of the ram air.

There has been some testing before on restriction of the stock airbox, the test results proved that there is only minor restriction at high RPM, to counter it you cut a 1.5-2" hole in the front part of the airbox. I am testing the K&N vs modified stock airbox for fuel efficiency purposes, still testing the K&N to collect data. Lizard King has a scoop under his bumper attached to the stock airbox which helped with highway MPG's, he's currently designing a new version. Keep an eye out for that.

Again I like your thinking, not trying to kill your idea but save your money and effort.
 

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Ram Air doesn't come into play until speeds over 150 mph. For any application. True ram air benefits the most be being well in front of the vehicle, like sticking forward 14" inches or so.

I know this from reading extensive research with ram air on Z06's - on that forum we have a guy that measures the A/F ratio at speed and with ram air comes increased density so you will be able to measure the data with MAF and A/F. he got a slight increase over 150 but not worth spending coin on aftermarket intakes.

I also remember reading about this type of thing in 1996 when the Suzuki Ram Air Direct SRAD system came out for the GSXR motorcycles.

one benefit of these types of modification is reducing the IAT which will reduce any knock retard timing being pulled. That only works for trucks that are sitting in traffic, once you get moving the IAT drops back down. This would be a factor if you are sitting in the staging lane at a drag race and your IAT is climbing and you ECU is cutting timing.

I do think it's a neat idea though! I was not aware about the airbox mod Drunk is talking about but it makes sense there are a wide variety of vehicles that see gains.. the Suzuki DRZ 400 being one of them.

Headers will probably be the best mod.... eventually i want to drop an LS3 motor in my truck.
 

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Headers help. Honestly it's hard to find extra power from these motors, the CPU tends to dislike anything that drastically changes the breathing.

The LS swap has been done twice on TS. I can't remember the first guys name but his was ultra clean, the second guy was Rhinosarge with his long travel truck.
 

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Headers help. Honestly it's hard to find extra power from these motors, the CPU tends to dislike anything that drastically changes the breathing.

The LS swap has been done twice on TS. I can't remember the first guys name but his was ultra clean, the second guy was Rhinosarge with his long travel truck.
yeah i didn't find a ton of info on this site. TS has some more documentation. looks like quite a task... i will have to wait until my 4.7 bites the dust (haha yeah right like that will happen)
 

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Hey Chard, if you want to bounce ideas around we're all for it. PM me if you want, or you could PM LizardKing and tell him I sent you. We all share here.

TS has info, it's just buried in bs and guys flaming new guys with "search" and bs like that. I only stop in there for two or three threads that I like and get out. This forum is better but the first gen section is dead compared to TS's.
 

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I like your thinking but it won't yield any significant gains. There are a few problems, if you essentially chamber the air filter by boxing it and add a scoop to force feed it, the motor will still only pull what it needs as far as air volume. In other words you can only fill the airbox with the volume of air that fits, any excess will simply blow by, kind of like a cup overflowing. Another issue is that this will only start to work at high speeds, at which point your trucks air resistance is countering any subtle effects of the ram air.

There has been some testing before on restriction of the stock airbox, the test results proved that there is only minor restriction at high RPM, to counter it you cut a 1.5-2" hole in the front part of the airbox. I am testing the K&N vs modified stock airbox for fuel efficiency purposes, still testing the K&N to collect data. Lizard King has a scoop under his bumper attached to the stock airbox which helped with highway MPG's, he's currently designing a new version. Keep an eye out for that.

Again I like your thinking, not trying to kill your idea but save your money and effort.
Ram Air doesn't come into play until speeds over 150 mph. For any application. True ram air benefits the most be being well in front of the vehicle, like sticking forward 14" inches or so.

I know this from reading extensive research with ram air on Z06's - on that forum we have a guy that measures the A/F ratio at speed and with ram air comes increased density so you will be able to measure the data with MAF and A/F. he got a slight increase over 150 but not worth spending coin on aftermarket intakes.

I also remember reading about this type of thing in 1996 when the Suzuki Ram Air Direct SRAD system came out for the GSXR motorcycles.

one benefit of these types of modification is reducing the IAT which will reduce any knock retard timing being pulled. That only works for trucks that are sitting in traffic, once you get moving the IAT drops back down. This would be a factor if you are sitting in the staging lane at a drag race and your IAT is climbing and you ECU is cutting timing.

I do think it's a neat idea though! I was not aware about the airbox mod Drunk is talking about but it makes sense there are a wide variety of vehicles that see gains.. the Suzuki DRZ 400 being one of them.

Headers will probably be the best mod.... eventually i want to drop an LS3 motor in my truck.
I thought I heard my name from over on that "other" forum. I must respectfully dissent from the majority opinion here. I have been running and testing Ram Air Intake Scoops on my truck, in various forms, for over 100,000 miles. I have gathered data, fined-tuned, made mistakes, learned from those mistakes, and made progress. Last summer I was turning 22-23 MPG on the highway at 70 MPH. Granted I have several modifications working in conjunction with each other and I seem to be most fortunate in that I have stumbled upon the correct combination of elements to put me where I am at now. Having said that my Ram Air Intake Scoop has garnered me the largest gains of any modification - driving habits constitute a large improvement as well.

I have found that the stock intake can benefit from a Ram Air Intake Scoop but there are limitations and caveats. The notion that the scoop can ingest water and hydro lock the motor has yet to hold (pardon the pun) water. I have never drawn any water up into the air box - ever. I have driven through deep puddles (not intentionally) and through six hours of relentless thunderstorms with no significant water in the air box. I have had moisture but no water in the sense that the air box becomes a bath tub.

Placement of the scoop is critical in terms of clean air and air pressure. Without air pressure the scoop is little more than tastless bling. It has to build pressure in order to work. Sealing the scoop, uptake tube, and air box is critical to building pressure. It is this pressure that enables the motor to breathe easier. There is a residual vacuum or pumping loss inherent in any conventional motor - equalizing this or pressurizing this helps.

I do all my work based on fuel economy and not the mainstream performance improvements. I cannot speak to performance improvements with a scoop but I can state that I see improvements in fuel economy at anything over 40 MPH as compared to pre-scoop numbers.

I am currently working on a new scoop in the bumper which is a location of higher air pressure and cleaner air than the previous location below the bumper. I am also testing some theories based on the Bernoulli principle and hope to have a new scoop/air box ready for testing in a few weeks.

My last set of calculations indicate that my scoop at 70 MPH generates less than a pound of pressure gain in a prefect system - mine is hardly close to perfect. Even so, the little boost that it creates is enough to offset pumping losses and help my fuel economy a little.
 

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I've heard of uphill both ways, I wish it could be downhill both ways.
 

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I thought I heard my name from over on that "other" forum. I must respectfully dissent from the majority opinion here. I have been running and testing Ram Air Intake Scoops on my truck, in various forms, for over 100,000 miles. I have gathered data, fined-tuned, made mistakes, learned from those mistakes, and made progress. Last summer I was turning 22-23 MPG on the highway at 70 MPH. Granted I have several modifications working in conjunction with each other and I seem to be most fortunate in that I have stumbled upon the correct combination of elements to put me where I am at now. Having said that my Ram Air Intake Scoop has garnered me the largest gains of any modification - driving habits constitute a large improvement as well.

I have found that the stock intake can benefit from a Ram Air Intake Scoop but there are limitations and caveats. The notion that the scoop can ingest water and hydro lock the motor has yet to hold (pardon the pun) water. I have never drawn any water up into the air box - ever. I have driven through deep puddles (not intentionally) and through six hours of relentless thunderstorms with no significant water in the air box. I have had moisture but no water in the sense that the air box becomes a bath tub.

Placement of the scoop is critical in terms of clean air and air pressure. Without air pressure the scoop is little more than tastless bling. It has to build pressure in order to work. Sealing the scoop, uptake tube, and air box is critical to building pressure. It is this pressure that enables the motor to breathe easier. There is a residual vacuum or pumping loss inherent in any conventional motor - equalizing this or pressurizing this helps.

I do all my work based on fuel economy and not the mainstream performance improvements. I cannot speak to performance improvements with a scoop but I can state that I see improvements in fuel economy at anything over 40 MPH as compared to pre-scoop numbers.

I am currently working on a new scoop in the bumper which is a location of higher air pressure and cleaner air than the previous location below the bumper. I am also testing some theories based on the Bernoulli principle and hope to have a new scoop/air box ready for testing in a few weeks.

My last set of calculations indicate that my scoop at 70 MPH generates less than a pound of pressure gain in a prefect system - mine is hardly close to perfect. Even so, the little boost that it creates is enough to offset pumping losses and help my fuel economy a little.
i respect your findings. it's just incredibly hard to believe that findings from hard data, being MAF and A/F ration readings are wrong. Even with 1 pound of pressure in your intake, that is just up into the air filter. your intake pressure would have to exceed your engine pumping intake capabilities for there to be a noticeable gain. I'm not saying there is no gain, i'm saying the gain is so minuscule it's not worth the effort.

The below thread, and the links contained in it, speak for what i'm saying. i of course am not saying it's the end all.... i mean, i averaged 15.4 mpg over the life of my 03 truck. in my 06 DC i get similar numbers with the 5 speed. i physically don't see a way that any CAI or ram air system could see a gain of 7 mpg. search for 1996 SRAD ram air tests as well. MAF and AF don't lie. they are raw scientific numbers.

Everything is ordered except for CAI. I'm thinking of keeping the stock intake - Corvette Forum
 

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It may also be a matter of cooler air rather than hot air thats trapped in the engine compartment, I know cooler /thicker air is great for aircraft and hot air not so much,
I would think volume would be increased with cooler "outside" air, maybe it is not a factor, but couldn't hurt.
 

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Ive though of something like this but my idea is more of the stock location of ventalation but building a fully enclosed box for the cai then conecting the airport in the wheel well with the enclosure using rubber hosing, completely shutting it off from the hot air from the engine doesnt sound hard just measurments cutting out peices from sheet metal add insolation, rubber hosing and then a k&n cai or aem one. Maybe have a hinge on the top so you can open the enclosure up and using rubber stripping to make it air tight and use side locks to lock it down as well
 

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Tank average? :confused:
Not tank average - just on the highway. Trip average for highway only.

Has to be trip average. I've clocked 21 on trip average before at best...
Lizard if that's tank average I'm going to install the heating element in your intake runner!
Yeah yeah.:lol5:

i respect your findings. it's just incredibly hard to believe that findings from hard data, being MAF and A/F ration readings are wrong. Even with 1 pound of pressure in your intake, that is just up into the air filter. your intake pressure would have to exceed your engine pumping intake capabilities for there to be a noticeable gain. I'm not saying there is no gain, i'm saying the gain is so minuscule it's not worth the effort.

The below thread, and the links contained in it, speak for what i'm saying. i of course am not saying it's the end all.... i mean, i averaged 15.4 mpg over the life of my 03 truck. in my 06 DC i get similar numbers with the 5 speed. i physically don't see a way that any CAI or ram air system could see a gain of 7 mpg. search for 1996 SRAD ram air tests as well. MAF and AF don't lie. they are raw scientific numbers.

Everything is ordered except for CAI. I'm thinking of keeping the stock intake - Corvette Forum
No worries - very few people believe my research and testing. I must clarify a few points first.

  • My highway mileage gains are not a result of the ram air intake scoop alone - they are the culmination of several modifications working in conjunction with each other. The scoop constitutes the single largest gain but not the majority of the gain.
  • The purpose of the scoop is not to function as a turbo charger or a super charger - it is simply to make it easier for the engine to breath.
  • I am not changing or attempting to change the A/F ratios - just trying to reduce the amount of energy expended on simple things like friction, pumping losses, and heat losses (or excess heat production).
I have read a little about the Vararam and have perused corvette forums in the past. I like the direct shot to the intake manifold set-up on the corvettes. I think subfloor's track testing is some real good information. I guess the gray area is where do fuel economy performance and horsepower performance intersect? The way I view it is horsepower is all about how much you can produce where as fuel economy is about how little can I get by with.

I was averaging around 15 MPG tank average when I first got my truck. Learning how to drive it probably accounted for a few MPG. The Scanguage has really helped me to fine tune my driving habits - best (non self-produced) fuel economy investment hands down.
 
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