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I live in the midwest and this will be my first winter with my tundra. I am hearing different things from other truck owners regarding weight in the bed for better traction. What is everyone's experience? And if necessary recs on what to use
 

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I don’t use any weight
 

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I have a 2013. I put 4 60lb sand bags in the back. It helps. I use 4wd without hesitation. I believe it’s better to use it then risking it.


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I have weight in mine all of the time, rides better and helps with traction. About 200-300 lbs
 
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Some extra weight in the back will definitely help in slippery conditions. Around 200# works good if you can put it back next to the tailgate.
4wd works fine on snow but you have to be careful in mixed conditions like drifting snow or patchy ice. The drive line can be damaged when driving in 4wd on dry pavement because there is no center differential.
 

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Some extra weight in the back will definitely help in slippery conditions. Around 200# works good if you can put it back next to the tailgate.
4wd works fine on snow but you have to be careful in mixed conditions like drifting snow or patchy ice. The drive line can be damaged when driving in 4wd on dry pavement because there is no center differential.
I thought the weight needs to be put to the front of the bed. Putting it to rear near tailgate will make it fish tail in bad condition.
 

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I thought the weight needs to be put to the front of the bed. Putting it to rear near tailgate will make it fish tail in bad condition.
Nope!! An empty truck is nose heavy and in 2wd you need the weight on the rear wheels for traction. Fully loaded would work the best for traction, but you don't want to haul 1500# of dead weight around all winter.
 

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I've been driving Tundra 4WDs for the past 13 1/2 years in Eastern Nebraska and SW Iowa. I don't make it a point to have weight in the back, though all of my trucks have been equipped with fiberglass caps that weigh about 200 pounds.

I use the 4WD for a little added directional stability when the roads are snow/ice covered. I also use it when going up the steep hill from the highway to my house. My trucks have always negotiated that stretch whether or not I have added weight in the back.

I also pulled a Chevy truck out of the ditch in South Central Missouri one snowy evening without added weight. That was particularly satisfying since it was one of those "good ol' boys" with the Chevy and Dale Earnhardt stickers all over the windows. He had no choice; I was the only help around and it was going to be a long cold night...but I digress.

If you think you need weight, get 2 or 3 of those 70 pound sand tubes and put them in the bed. I wouldn't put them any further forward than over the rear axle. You can put them further toward the rear of the truck if you'd like. I don't think a couple hundred pounds at the rear-most portion of the bed would cause a significant stability issue. My truck weighs 6000 pounds with the cap and a full fuel tank. 200 pounds by the tailgate vice the front of the bed doesn't shift the center of gravity that much.

The sand tubes are easy to deal with and easy to store in the off-season. They can also provide some sand for traction if you find yourself needing it.
 

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3 sand tubes over the axle for me.
I've tried not to use 4wd, but maybe I should use it more in snowy conditions.

That AWD mod would be great, but I don't feel like F*#cking with the truck even though it is 8 years old as I've never had a problem with it to date and dealer probably wouldn't like it if I ever do trade it in. :dunno:
 

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I usually have 2 bags of salt and 2 tubes of sand with me. Just incase if there's a place that needs some extra salting or sand. Or if I happen to get stuck somewhere in this great Minnesota weather. I guess the extra weight helps. I also carry a crossover box full of tools and a bed usually full of tools. Oh and a trailer.
 

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I live in Mid-Michigan. I've driven Tundra's since 2012, both trucks have had 4 wheel drive.
I also place 400 pounds of sand (in bags) right over the rear axle. If you look on the inside of your truck bed you'll see indentations in front of and behind your wheel wells, on each side. I don't know what their technical name is, or their intended purpose. But I saw my grand dad cut and place (2) 2X6's in those bumps in his truck when I was a kid. I've done the same to almost every truck I've owned. It forms a box that I place my sand bags in and keeps them from sliding front to back.
About 3 years ago we had one snow fall that dropped 18" all at one time. My Tundra was the only vehicle on the road. I didn't want to go out but the Doctor wife needed to get to work, so I took her.
I also keep good tires with plenty of tread depth on my truck. I use 4 wheel drive liberally to keep me out of trouble, because once your in trouble (the ditch) it takes more effort to get out.

Good Luck!
 

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maybe Ill throw some sand bags in there for grins and try it out. A little less axle hop wouldn't hurt my feelings anyway

lord knows my MPG can't get any worse anyway, LOL
 

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Usually my winter mod involves rolling down the windows. :D
ya ya,

you can use ice water bags over the rear axle in the summer:x
 
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