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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Looking for some input. Ready to pull the trigger on either white knuckle or sdhq sliders. I like how the sdhq's fit tight up on the body but they seem to offer less protection on the ends of the sliders. It appears that the white knuckles pretty much protect the rocker from end to end. Thoughts? I'm Not rock crawling but like to be prepared. Thanks in advance!



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I noted the same thing when I was looking at sliders. What it came down to for me was ease of installation. The SDHQ sliders are much easier to install. As an added bonus, the SDHQ sliders are made of a stronger material.

The SDHQ sliders are made that way on purpose to accommodate people running very large tires that might hit the White Knuckle slider. When you really think about it, while it looks like there are unprotected sections of the rocker panel, by the time your front tire comes off the rock/tree/etc to the point you might hit your panel, the slider would already be in contact with the obstacle or your wheel would provide for enough clearance that the obstacle would be aft of that small area and under the front portion of the slider by the time your wheel clears the obstacle. Similarly for the rear, by the time you reach the back end of the slider, your rear tire should already be climbing up on the obstacle. I bet my truck on the idea that the small exposed panel portions are unlikely to take a hit.
 

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I've had the white knuckle sliders on for a little over 2 years, and have no complaints and they provide great piece of mind against rocker damage. Installation wasn't that bad. They've taken a few hits with the only damage being the paint, which is easily touched up. John @ white knuckle was super helpful and a pleasure to deal with. SDHQ didn't have them available for the tundra when I was shopping, but I'd still go with white knuckle if I was buying again. I also added the full diamond top plate John offers to make it easier for my wife and daughter to get in and out of the truck.

As far as material strength vs sdhq both are plenty strong (splitting hairs), and you can get white knuckle sliders in 0.120 DOM or 0.188 DOM (sdhq only offers 0.120 on their website). 0.188 DOM is mostly used for rock crawlers who take big continued hits, so a little overkill for what it sounds like your intended use is
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the feedback guys. Sounds like both good options. I went ahead and ordered the SDHQ's. Kinda like that they bolt on and tuck up close to the body. Cheers.

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As far as material strength vs sdhq both are plenty strong (splitting hairs), and you can get white knuckle sliders in 0.120 DOM or 0.188 DOM (sdhq only offers 0.120 on their website). 0.188 DOM is mostly used for rock crawlers who take big continued hits, so a little overkill for what it sounds like your intended use is
Except that the SDHQ sliders are made from chromoly. The 0.120 chromoly is just as strong if not stronger than the 0.188 material used on the White Knuckle sliders while weighing less at the same time. It's not splitting hairs, chromoly is significantly stronger than basic steel of the same thickness.
 

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Thanks for the feedback guys. Sounds like both good options. I went ahead and ordered the SDHQ's. Kinda like that they bolt on and tuck up close to the body. Cheers.

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You can't really go wrong with either brand, but, the SDHQ sliders are higher quality and you don't have to drill holes into your frame. I think you'll like your new sliders a lot
 

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You can't go wrong with either brand, both are well fabricated so pick what you like and use them.

Without knowing the specific alloys used you can't really compare material strengths, even the specific alloys have a range so some batches are better or worse than others. That said, I think you're confusing mild steel with what is most commonly used as DOM (1020 alloy). Some chromoly alloys are weaker, but if you generalize and pick commonly used alloys for both the .120 DOM (1020) and chromoly (4130N), you're only looking at a strength increase of ~10% from the chromoly. Remember too that as metal hardness increases so does brittleness.

Tubing strength guide: 4130N (chromoly)>1020 (DOM)>1015 (HREW)>A53 (ASTM Pipe). While 4130N is only ~10% stronger than 1020, 4130N is ~70% stronger than A53.

All four materials have the same density so there is no weight difference for the same size tubing.

.188 DOM is only about 1 lb/ft heavier than .120 DOM for the same size OD tube

Which when you consider the OP's intended application, I consider 10% to pretty much be a minor difference in materials. If it was being used as a safety cage, I'd personally want the increase from chromoly, but when you account for how strong both materials are, does it really matter for a rock slider that the OP is using for protection against accidental hits on the trail?

At the end of the day the only thing that really matters is that you get out and wheel your truck and have fun :) (unless you're like some engineer friends of mine that love to look at spreadsheets about stuff like this)

OP post up some pics of you putting the sliders to good use once you have them on your truck
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks all. Will get some pics up when i get them installed and put to use. Shouldnt be hard as I've come dangerously close to rocker damage a good number of times.

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