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Discussion Starter #1
I have a 2012 double cab and the area of the frame where the recommended jacking point is on the front is too wide for the saddles on my 6 ton jack stands. I don't feel comfortable resting the truck on the very tips of the saddles. As you go further back, the frame rails do get narrower but at that point it looks to far back to hold the front up in a stable manner. Where have you guys had success placing your jack stands?
 

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I can understand your reluctance to have the weight of the vehicle resting on a small point, rather than spread across a larger area.

When I'm in a situation like that, I will put a short length of 2x4 across the saddle of the jack stand. That increased surface area will spread the load. Make sure the block is on it's side so the weight of the truck compresses across the grain. I only use wood for this purpose. I often use a block of wood on top of the factory jack when jacking the vehicle for placement of jack stands. But that's to lessen the amount of cranking I need to do to reach the desired height.

The risk probably isn't very great. Keep in mind that the top of the factory-supplied jack has a relatively small surface area as well and it won't punch through the frame (unless it's heavily corroded).

I wouldn't move the support point for the jack stand to anyplace other than the recommended spot. It's designed for the load.
 

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Not sure what type of jack some of you have, but when doing front end work I usually have to jack-up the A-Arms, one at a time, put my jack stand under the A-Arm in order for me to maintain any height. I usually find a point on the A-Arm where I can let it rest in the saddle of the jack stand. It can be tricky getting the jack and jack stand located in that same area but it is doable.
 

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Not sure what type of jack some of you have, but when doing front end work I usually have to jack-up the A-Arms, one at a time, put my jack stand under the A-Arm in order for me to maintain any height. I usually find a point on the A-Arm where I can let it rest in the saddle of the jack stand. It can be tricky getting the jack and jack stand located in that same area but it is doable.
I usually do the same thing. Just didn't want to say so due the fact you have to be careful using that area.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I can understand your reluctance to have the weight of the vehicle resting on a small point, rather than spread across a larger area.

When I'm in a situation like that, I will put a short length of 2x4 across the saddle of the jack stand. That increased surface area will spread the load. Make sure the block is on it's side so the weight of the truck compresses across the grain. I only use wood for this purpose. I often use a block of wood on top of the factory jack when jacking the vehicle for placement of jack stands. But that's to lessen the amount of cranking I need to do to reach the desired height.

The risk probably isn't very great. Keep in mind that the top of the factory-supplied jack has a relatively small surface area as well and it won't punch through the frame (unless it's heavily corroded).

I wouldn't move the support point for the jack stand to anyplace other than the recommended spot. It's designed for the load.

my worry isn't denting, it's a stability concern. Just doesnt seem super secure having the frame sit on the very tips of jack stand saddles instead of actually in the cup. It just seems like it could easily slip off, especially if i need to hammer or use any kind of force on anything, like kicking a stubborn wheel off a hub
 

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my worry isn't denting, it's a stability concern. Just doesnt seem super secure having the frame sit on the very tips of jack stand saddles instead of actually in the cup. It just seems like it could easily slip off, especially if i need to hammer or use any kind of force on anything, like kicking a stubborn wheel off a hub
If it was me, stability while the truck is on jack stands at the designed jacking spot wouldn't be a concern. The stability in the jack stands is provided by the legs of the stands that flare out from the central post. The weight of the vehicle transfers downward and then out to the point those legs touch the floor surface. If you're whacking on a wheel hub hard enough to overcome the static downward force of a couple thousand pounds sitting on the stands, something else is way more likely to break before you move the vehicle on those stands.
 
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