Toyota Tundra Discussion Forum banner

21 - 40 of 55 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,165 Posts
Keep the tires a reasonable size so you can use the stock spare tire space.
Is there a problem with using the smaller spare for emergencies?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
137 Posts
Brake rotors...gonna be getting my third ones soon in less than 28k miles.
61k and still running original pads and rotors on my 14 dc.
Plenty of life still left
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
Discussion Starter #23
No LSD?

How many passengers will you be taking? With all that equipment you will be overloaded for sure. here's my advice: Keep the stock rear bumper. Keep the tires a reasonable size so you can use the stock spare tire space. Do not use blocks/spacers. A 2.5-3" lift is perfect. Get yourself a set of good coilovers such as King/Fox. You will need the extra travel and cooling from the resevoirs. I have the Dakar springs. They are reasonable price and they lift the truck and carry the added weight nicely while extending the travel. Skip the skid plates. Not necessary. And LSD not necessary; just learn how to use the ATRAC. With storage systems keep in mind the weight. The tundra frame flexes a lot. The Tundra makes an excellent off-road vehicle/expedition build platform.

https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLfzEPvngaAkyoEY0Jsi9Sd-fioA1gmorM
Why do you say a LSD is not necessary? Without one i can barley make it out of the driveway let alone going anywhere chained up.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
Discussion Starter #24
Don't combine a spacer lift with a lift strut.
Not a good thing to do.

Either go full coilover or go with the 6112's and a shim or two if you want to go higher than 2.5", Uca, and a +2 shackle in the rear for 1" lift or a full leaf pack.

You with have a much better suspension in the end.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Im not trying to argue but why not this route? I have ran this setup on all of my rigs and have never had any issues.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
306 Posts
That thing is a pile of garbage. The nudge the thing gives you when you need as much traction as possible is about as useful if i left the thing in drive and got out and pushed.


It actually isn't. It works quite well I've never had an issue. Maybe you have crap tires.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
Discussion Starter #30
It actually isn't. It works quite well I've never had an issue. Maybe you have crap tires.
Brand new goodyear duratracks. You have to understand my drive way is about half a mile long through a field. Snow drifts are of the norm as is mud. If the thing worked half as well as any other manufactures LSD or locker i would not be complaining, but it does not hence the questions.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
306 Posts
Brand new goodyear duratracks. You have to understand my drive way is about half a mile long through a field. Snow drifts are of the norm as is mud. If the thing worked half as well as any other manufactures LSD or locker i would not be complaining, but it does not hence the questions.


Cool. I've driven through all kinds of snow and never had a problem. Traditional lsd's wear out. Had one on a ram and it was useless.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,520 Posts
Im not trying to argue but why not this route? I have ran this setup on all of my rigs and have never had any issues.
Spacers are never a good idea. They will be ok most of the time on a street only truck. What happens is, the strut becomes the bumpstop and can (and has) collapsed. not to mention you are putting a weak spot in the front end by adding a joint between the spacer and the strut.

There isn't anything wrong with 5100's. Adding a 2.5" lift strut to a 1" lifted strut will "work", but you will run into the issue of the strut becoming the bump stop again. Also your CV angles won't be very good, even with a diff drop, and you will definitely need new UCAs to get it aligned.

If you use your truck off road, bigger is better. The 6112's are a 2.5" shock with a lighter eibach spring tuned for the Tundra. It rides much better than stock, and is a great middle ground. Of course some high end coilovers will be great if you have the budget. If you have any suspension questions, hit up dirtydeeds. He has posted a lot of good info, explanations, and videos explaining all of this. He can also hook you up with a good deal on parts.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,071 Posts
The biggest weak point in a Tundra is the owner's wallet LOL. Damn so many things you can do to these trucks. Really I think the possibilities are endless. I believe you can get lockers for the front and rear...not sure how the front locker idea would be with the IFS type setup...would be interesting to hear how it does and any issues resulting from a front locker. Rear locker wouldn't be an issue since the rear is already a solid axle. I know ARB has a rear locker, not sure about a front. Someday I'd love to get an ARB rear locker, it would be a great tool and it wouldn't cause any issues with the ALSD system....just makes the truck that much more capable.

I had a couple of alignment issues early on which were easily corrected with a regular alignment but if you hit stuff with the front end especially if you are hauling or towing it can cause alignment issues it seems like kind of easily compared to having a solid front axle. I'm just far more careful now when driving off paved roads LOL.

I've got 102k on my 08 tundra and overall its been a great truck. There was the front diff issue howling/growling which was somewhat common on the earlier trucks, had a rear axle bearing growling which was also replaced. Other than that its been a solid truck and been extremely happy with my dealer through the 9 years I've had my truck they've done everything very well and even took care of part of the front diff replacement cost as the truck has been 100% dealer serviced since I bought it new. I haven't lifted or otherwise modified my truck other than the camper shell and rhino lined the bed. I did ask the dealer one time if I had it lifted and larger wheels/tires put on if it would have any effect on my warranty and they said no as long as it was installed properly so it seems at least my dealer and Toyota is pretty good about letting customers customize their vehicles within reason.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
294 Posts
Why do you say a LSD is not necessary? Without one i can barley make it out of the driveway let alone going anywhere chained up.
To put it simply, because you have4WD, VSC and traction control for the street. But we are primarily talking about off-road expedition travel, right? LSD does nothing for off-road traction. If you were going to open the diffs then put in ARB locking diffs, but even that is not necessary. ATRAC and 4WD will get you anywhere the Tundra will fit.

This is me going up Widowmaker. I get caught in a cross-axled situation in loose dirt and fail the first attempt because i have disabled the ATRAC. Second attempt I make it through by finessing the ATRAC which brakes the spinning wheels sending toque to the opposite wheel with traction. You have to give it gas and not hit the brakes or it will cancel ATRAC. I was fully loaded as well over 7000 lbs pushing GVWR

http://youtu.be/4JXnPqHPh_U?list=PLfzEPvngaAkyoEY0Jsi9Sd-fioA1gmorM

This is on LSDs and off-road:

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
294 Posts
Brand new goodyear duratracks. You have to understand my drive way is about half a mile long through a field. Snow drifts are of the norm as is mud. If the thing worked half as well as any other manufactures LSD or locker i would not be complaining, but it does not hence the questions.
For this situation the best is 4wd. If you are loosing traction (and seeing the traction control light come on) then it's perfectly safe to run 4WD because you are loosing traction. It's when you can't loose traction that things will bind.

I live in Northern AZ and it's hilly and mountainous and right now ice and snow. The best is setting is 4WD hi or just the default setting.

By the way, ALSD and the default setting are the same except ALSD does not reduce engine rpm. The default setting is what you want to run in slippery conditions if you don't run 4WD. ALSD is for special situations where you need to spin the tires (such as getting mud out of tire tread voids to get traction).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,165 Posts
Im not trying to argue but why not this route? I have ran this setup on all of my rigs and have never had any issues.
You normally use a 2.5" strut spacer lift offroad? Well, you won't like it on a Tundra. Strut is too long, you'll bind the joints. Strut will act as the bumpstop and collapse. Off road it will ride like shit til it breaks.

mrmachinest mentioned Bilstein 6112s. I think they are a good value, but the light spring rate (600 lb vs 700 lb stock) won't be ideal if you load your truck. 5100s are a good budget option. You run into a few issues if you take the front over ~2" lift (needing UCAs for alignment, diff drop, not enough down travel, etc), so if you want the best bang for buck set your 5100s about 2", and leave the rear alone.

If your truck is loaded, OME struts and springs are good value option also before you get into 2.5" adjustable coilovers.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
Discussion Starter #39
You normally use a 2.5" strut spacer lift offroad? Well, you won't like it on a Tundra. Strut is too long, you'll bind the joints. Strut will act as the bumpstop and collapse. Off road it will ride like shit til it breaks.

mrmachinest mentioned Bilstein 6112s. I think they are a good value, but the light spring rate (600 lb vs 700 lb stock) won't be ideal if you load your truck. 5100s are a good budget option. You run into a few issues if you take the front over ~2" lift (needing UCAs for alignment, diff drop, not enough down travel, etc), so if you want the best bang for buck set your 5100s about 2", and leave the rear alone.

If your truck is loaded, OME struts and springs are good value option also before you get into 2.5" adjustable coilovers.
What would you guys go with this thing hanging on the front end?
2014-2017 Toyota Tundra Mayhem
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
294 Posts
21 - 40 of 55 Posts
Top