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Oct 2009 ToTM Winner
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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Found this true tested dyno and all write up of the Volant CAI. I will start with the Dyno sheet.;)



We found out about the Volant’s new cold air intake for the 5.7L Tundra on TundraTalk.net, a nice forum for Tundra owners. After reading a few positive reviews from forum members, we contacted Volant and asked them if they might be interested in allowing us to review their product. They gladly accepted, and a brand new cold air intake arrived at our door.



Our first impressions of the Volant intake were positive. Opening the package, we were amazed at just how simple this kit is. There’s the air box, duct, filter, some clamps, a hose connector, and some nuts and bolts. The air box’s chrome surface (see photo) is covered with plastic film to protect the finish as you install the kit — a nice touch. There’s also a brochure and some very rudimentary instructions.

Speaking of instructions, installation is brutally simple. This has definitely got to be one of the highlights of this kit. Simply remove the stock air filter, engine cover, loosen a couple of clamps, unplug a couple of hoses, remove a couple of bolts, and the factory box is out of the truck. Next, you assemble the air box, bolt it into place, and reconnect all the hoses. One complaint we have - and it’s minor - is that the instructions themselves are pretty poor. They tell you how to get the job done, but we think someone should go through them and fill-in a couple of the blanks. The quality of the instructions themselves is also lacking — they look like they were made on an old zerox machine. Finally, the pages of instructions were actually stapled in the wrong order. Like we said, it’s a minor complaint — install is really easy — but the value of the kit might be a little higher if the instructions were higher quality (both in material and clarity).


One of the other problems we have with this kit has to do with Toyota’s engine cover. First of all, in Volant’s defense, the piece of plastic that is supposed to “look like” an engine is stupid. It’s just there so that when a salesman opens the hood of the truck, he doesn’t forget the engine size and the customer can nod appreciatively and say “yes, that’s the 5.7L alright”. Basically, the engine cover is completely useless. Anyways, the problem here (and it’s minor) is that Volant’s air intake takes up some of the space that the engine cover needs to rest in. Volant provides a higher stud for the engine cover to attach to, but it’s not as solid as the factory setup. It’s not a big deal — the engine cover doesn’t do anything, doesn’t support anything, and really doesn’t need to be attached very tightly — but it would be nice if they had a solution that was a little more clever.

Fit and finish on the rest of the kit is excellent - the air box is flush against the fender and completely sealed so that only cool outside air can make it into the engine. [We've since been informed that the kit doesn't completely seal against the fender. There is a small gap. Our tests indicate the gap doesn't effect performance, but it should be noted.] This is a major selling point for Volant - they have studies that show most air boxes (both OEM and after market) let hot engine gases seep into the air the engine breathes, raising the air’s temperature and thus decreasing performance.

We have to say that the Volant kit looks awesome — it’s much more impressive than the factory air box and it looks a lot nicer than other air intakes we’ve seen. Sure, looks aren’t everything, but who doesn’t like to show off a cool accessory under the hood?



The air filter inside this kit is also a selling point for Volant. Unlike many competing companies, Volant’s PowerCore air filter is not made from cotton gauze. Instead, hundreds of staggered flutes catch 99.95% of the particulates that can damage your motor, and it does so without needing to be oiled periodically. Volant warranties their PowerCore air filters for 4 years or 100k miles, and they offer their filters in sizes that are compatible with air intakes from K&N, AEM, etc. We like the idea of a dry filter (cleaning and re-oiling filters is never fun or interesting), and we are intrigued by Volant’s claim that their filter allows better flow while catching more particulate matter.

So let’s get down to brass tax — how did the intake perform? When we first started the truck, we were amazed at how quite the Volant intake is. Whether sitting at idle or cruising down the highway, we didn’t notice any additional noise from under the hood. However, when you floor the throttle, you can hear the engine sing. Without exaggeration, you just can’t help but smile under full throttle. The sound is so pleasing to the ear, it’s like driving a race car. Very cool. We’d have to say the price of the kit might just be worth the sound alone.


Sounds of the Volant Air Intake for the Toyota Tundra - watch the video to hear the intake in operation.

Additionally, we noticed faster throttle response. Before, our test vehicle hesitated slightly on changes in throttle. With the Volant intake installed, response was almost instantaneous. The truck also felt quicker, both from a dead stop and as we accelerated on the highway. Overall, the kit seemed to make a big difference and it felt very good to drive.As far as horses are concerned, Volant claims the kit will add as much as 21hp to your Tundra’s 5.7L engine. They’ve even got the dyno graph to prove it. Looking closely at Volant’s graph, it looks like the air intake added about 14 hp at 5000 rpm, and nearly 18 hp at 5300 rpm. Our own results basically mirrored that result, but with lower magnitude. We recorded an 8 hp gain at 5000 rpm, and about 10 hp at 5350 rpm. Considering our base truck was making about 287 hp that day, and that the base truck in the Volant test was making nearly 300, we’re thinking that better conditions might have yielded better results (at least for our tests). But, like any cold air intake kit, the manufacturer’s estimates are always a little optimistic. Nonetheless, the difference we felt in power before and after was substantial. We think you can plan on seeing a gain of at least 5-10 hp, with some owners experiencing the full 21 hp Volant reports.
Click for larger view.

All in all, we like the Volant kit. It looks good, sounds good, drives good, and improves performance. We’re extremely confident in telling current Tundra owners that the Volant kit will add power. Like we said in our Tundra air intake guide, the factory air intake is pretty decent. But if you’re looking for a little more power, a more aggressive sounding truck (at least on WOT), or if you want to maximize horsepower gains from other accessories, installing a cold air intake makes sense.
 

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Oct 2009 ToTM Winner
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Discussion Starter #2
Then here is the K&N CAI write up, should have used a different title.

Any way

No Dyno Sheet


When it comes to air intake kits, K&N is like Coca Cola. Everybody who’s ever talked about performance knows about K&N. They invented the re-usable cotton gauze air filters that have been the basis of every performance air filter and air intake since they went into business 35 years ago. K&N literally founded the market for performance air intakes and filters, and they deserve a lot of credit for bringing proper engine breathing to the forefront of the consumer’s mind.

We were invited to test both K&N’s performance air filter and their 63 series air intake, and if you follow this site closely you’ll know that the K&N performance air filter passed our tests with flying colors and received our whole-hearted endorsement. Yet it’s hard for us to make the same recommendation about K&N’s 63 series air intake.



The K&N 63 series intake installed in a 2007 Toyota Tundra with the 5.7L.
First of all, the kit itself and the install process were unduly complicated. K&N’s 63 series is unlike the factory air box or the Volant and aFe kits we tested. Instead of placing a high performance filter in a custom made air box, K&N asks you to strip away the factory air box and replace it with a carefully bent piece of punched sheet metal, some brackets, some clamps, some weather stripping, a tube, hardware, and a nice filter that you assemble yourself.



K&N’s 63 series air intake requires quite a bit of assembly prior to installation, especially when compared to similarly priced kits from aFe and Volant.

To install the air intake, you have to build it first. You take the two pieces of weather stripping and tediously slide them onto the inside and outside edges of the sheel metal that separates the intake from the engine. Then, once you’ve completed that step, it’s time to bolt down four separate brackets that attach the sheet metal separator to the truck. There’s also a funny looking air tube support that must be placed in the engine compartment just so. Finally, you have the more familiar install steps like pulling the MAF out of the stock air box and installing it in the new kit.



The separator requires four different brackets to be installed in order to make sure it’s secure. The ‘K’ in K&N is for ‘Komplicated.’

Installing the hose clamps is a complicated process too - or at least it must be, because the air filter fell off the air tube on our test unit (during the middle of a hill climb with trailer, no less). Either we didn’t get it tight enough or the clamp loosened up on us.

Without going on and on about the install process (maybe it’s too late?), let’s just say the ‘K’ in ‘K&N’ stands for ‘Komplicated.’ We could install two or three air intake kits from aFe or Volant in the time it takes to install one intake kit from K&N. Even worse, it’s hard to imagine how K&N’s “some assembly required” kit costs the same or more than kits from aFe and Volant. It seems that you should get some sort of discount for doing all the labor yourself. At least the instructions were clear and well illustrated…


Installing the K&N Series 63 air intake is more complicated and time consuming than competitive intakes.

When it comes to fit and finish, we’ve got another bone to pick. K&N’s kit requires that you tediously install weather stripping into the inside hole of the separator. It would seem that the purpose of this would be to block warm engine air from passing by the separator and entering the filter, yet there’s a significant gap between the tube and the hole in the separator. The gap between the tube and the hole varies between 1″ and 2″ wide all the way around. Not only is this disappointing to realize after you’ve spent all that time installing weather stripping, it’s also hard to understand why K&N didn’t make the design a little better. We asked our contact at K&N about this and he explained that they need a gap to accommodate vibrations. That seems, at best, a misunderstanding. What would reduce vibration more than a snug fit between the tube and the separator?



The gap between the tube and the separator is pretty big, varying between 1″ and 2″ inches.

In terms of performance, the K&N air intake kit worked as advertised. In addition to measuring horsepower, we also measured fuel economy. Our test vehicle, a 2007 Tundra with a few thousand miles, enjoyed about a 1 mpg average fuel economy improvement. Our test truck averaged about 14.5 mpg before the intake was installed, so figure the K&N intake improved fuel economy by about 7%. If gas costs $4 a gallon, it will only take about 20k miles for this kit to pay for itself, not counting the filter cleaning kit (needed every 50k miles or so). When you factor in the lifetime air filter, buying a K&N 63 series air intake kit makes financial sense.


Sound of the K&N Series 63 air intake kit installed on a 2007 Toyota Tundra 5.7L V8.

Like all the air intake kits we’ve tested before, the 63 series looks and sounds better than the factory air box. The chrome surrounding the big air filter makes this thing look impressive, and the engine breathes loud and clear. In fact, the K&N 63 series sounds the best of any kit we’ve heard. It’s probably because the K&N filter isn’t encased in a sound-absorbing plastic box. It sounds good, and perhaps that’s why K&N decided to make install a little more complicated.

Performance is good too - just about the same as every other kit we’ve tested. Our data showed a 10 hp increase at about 4300 RPM. That doesn’t match K&N’s official dyno tests, but it’s still a very decent power gain. Throttle response was also noticeably quicker once the K&N 63 series was installed.

Our tests show that the K&N kit performs as well as any other kit we’ve tested. While this K&N kit review was the first time we measured fuel economy, it’s a safe bet that the Volant and aFe kits we’ve tested (see our aFe intake review and Volant intake review) also improved gas mileage. In fact, they’re all probably equally beneficial when it comes to gas mileage based on the fact that all the horsepower numbers are so similar.

Bottom Line: K&N’s kit sounds great and performs well, and we documented a solid gain in performance AND fuel economy after installing the kit. Unfortunately, installation is the problem with the K&N 63 series. The install process is tedious (compared to other air intake installs) and it’s more complicated than necessary. Complication increases the chance for errors, as witnessed by the filter falling off the test truck. We also can’t help but we feel that the K&N kit should be less expensive than its competitors considering so much of the assembly is done by the end user.

We recommend the aFe air intake kit over the K&N 63 series air intake. Performance is similar, but aFe’s kit is much easier to install and there is less that can go wrong.
 

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Oct 2009 ToTM Winner
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Discussion Starter #3
And one more the AFE CAI write up.

Dyno Sheet.


Advanced Flow Engineering, or aFe, has been making performance air intakes for a variety of popular vehicles since 1999. During that time, aFe products have gained a reputation for offering noticeable performance gains for an affordable price. Basically, after market air intakes add power by eliminating the factory air intake “silencer”, a baffle chamber that removes resonance in the intake that serves to reduce engine noise, and they increase airflow by replacing the cheap factory air filter with a high-flow unit (read more about why air intakes work). We contacted aFe and requested an air intake to review for the 5.7 Tundra, and they sent one along right away. Here’s our review:



A great photo of the air intake fully assembled.
The kit came in a nicely decorated box and the most important part, the air filter, was carefully packaged. aFe also packed the top cover of the air box in plastic in order to protect it from scratches, etc. We wouldn’t want the flashiest part of the intake system getting bunged up, would we? aFe’s kit also comes with a washable and reusable air filter that does a nice job of filling up the air box. aFe offers two types of filters on this kit - an oil free model, and the traditional cotton gauze oil filter (shown and reviewed here). aFe’s own testing shows that their kit will flow 50% more air than the stock air box, a tremendous increase in air flow. Considering the size of the filter, that’s not hard to believe. A funny note - a casual inspection of the outside of the box led a couple of people to believe the kit was adding 19 hp and 117 lb-ft of torque! Incredulous, we looked more closely and realized all the dyno results on the outside of the box had nothing to do with our kit - they’re for different models (a Duramax, a Cummins, etc.). So, the moral is, don’t get excited when you look at the numbers on the box without reading to find out what type of vehicle they were added to.



Make sure to look at the numbers on the the aFe air intake box carefully, or you’ll be in for quite a shock!

Installing these air intake kits is pretty simple - you’ll need to remove the stock air intake tube, the stock air filter and air box, and make sure to disconnect the MAF sensor and a couple of hoses. Pull the MAF sensor out of the stock air tube and insert it into the pre-drilled slot on the AEM tube, screw it down in the pre-drilled holes using the provided screws and washers, then simply reverse the removal process. A couple of notes - the instructions provided by aFe don’t tell you to install the provided grommet on the fender inlet. They also don’t mention that you should remove the mounting hardware from the stock air box and use that for the aFe box. As usual, the instructions on this after market part were less than perfect (it looks like they’re for a 99-06 Tundra). They’re good enough, but they could definitely be improved. In any case, an experienced installer with the right tools can pull the stock system out and mount the new system in less than 20 minutes. A home mechanic shouldn’t need more than an hour.


Fit and finish is good - all the parts go together well enough. The only issue is that the seal between the fender air inlet and the aFe air box isn’t perfect. It’s decent - definitely good enough - but it’s not perfect. Since this was something we dinged the Volant kit for when we reviewed the Volant intake back in October, it bears mentioning. The gap is small - maybe an 1/8th of an inch - and it goes all the way around the inlet. If we played with the fender inlet grommet and the air box, we could get a good seal. However, it felt like it would eventually work it’s way loose. We don’t think this is important for a few reasons. First of all, aFe’s kit pulls air from both the fender inlet AND the engine compartment (there’s a big hole in the front of the air box for this purpose), so a perfect seal on the inlet wouldn’t really matter anyway - you’re still getting warm engine compartment air mixed in. We spoke to aFe’s Jason Bruce about this, and his response was pretty enlightening.

Basically, the Tundra’s fender inlet can’t provide enough air to the aFe kit by itself. In order to get enough air to really improve performance at the top end, the kit is designed to pull air from the engine compartment using the hole in the front of the aFe air box. Jason was quick to point out that in this situation (near top RPMs), the vehicle is moving down the road and air is flowing into the engine compartment, so heat isn’t really an issue. While it is true that warm air mixes with cool intake air while the truck is stationary, that’s not terribly important. After all, no one is concerned about increasing horsepower and torque while the vehicle is at idle. aFe’s explanation makes a lot of sense, and their kit performed well enough to make us believers.

Our tests show that the aFe kit, despite pulling air from the engine compartment and the less than perfect fender inlet fit, performs quite well (see below). Also, unlike the Volant air intake kit we tested, there’s no problem with the new air tube displacing the factory engine cover. aFe also pre-drilled the MAF sensor mounting holes in their tube for us, something that Volant skipped. Comparing the aFe kit to the Volant kit, the overall quality on the aFe kit was higher, despite the fact that neither kit perfectly seals to the fender air inlet.



Before and after the aFe air intake is installed on the 5.7 Tundra.

As expected, the aFe air intake looks and sounds MUCH better than the stock system. There’s a nice aluminum cover on top of the intake that adds a little bit of shine to the engine compartment, not to mention the awesome improvement in engine noise. Inside or outside the truck, during idle, and even during steady cruising, there’s not much difference in engine noise. However, when you jump on the throttle you can definitely hear the engine growl. Make sure to watch the video below to hear the sounds of the aFe air intake.


Finally, we come to the most important part of the review process, the performance testing. Our test vehicle, a 2008 5.7L Tundra with about 150 miles on it, was noticeably quicker in terms of throttle response. Our dyno test results showed solid horsepower gains in both 3rd gear and 4th gear tests, confirming what our minds told us as we drove the truck around town. Dyno testing being what it is, it’s always hard to count on specific numbers. We saw about a 9 hp gain around 4,850 RPM and 10 hp around 4,250 RPM (both at the rear wheel). aFe’s own testing showed a 19 hp gain at 3900 RPM. We had difficulty testing the truck reliably at 3900 RPM because the Tundra’s transmission likes to shift at that point. Still, it’s a safe bet this intake will add at least 5hp to your truck (at the wheels), and 19hp may be possible.



Click image for a larger view.

Bottom Line: We like aFe’s kit - it’s simple, reasonably priced (AutoAnything sells them for about $350), and the quality is good. Picking up 5-10 rear wheel horsepower is always good, not to mention this kit’s great sound and looks. Combine this intake with a nice exhaust system and you should see another 5 or so rear wheel hp.

When it comes to the Tundra 5.7, we recommend the aFe air intake over the Volant air intake for the following reasons: aFe’s kit doesn’t require you to use self-tapping screws to install the MAF sensor (which looks and feels cheap), and it fits correctly with the factory engine cover. Both kits exhibited decent performance gains, and they both sounded great. Assuming you can get the two kits for about the same price (which is true at the time of this posting), the aFe kit makes more sense than the Volant. That’s not to take anything away from Volant - it’s just not quite as nice. Simple as that.
 

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Oct 2009 ToTM Winner
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Discussion Starter #4
So as I see between all 3 they gained 10hp each as an average.

So you do get gains with just an intake but it sure as hell isnt what the manufacturer states such as the 20+hp for Volant, 19hp AFE, but K&N claims 8hp gains which is true unlike the others opting to show larger gains.

I know different conditions will give different results but as an average atleast K&N was truthful to a normal gain.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Hey no fair mine is silver too and I dont think I got that much, maybe they change the hue in the silvers color
from '09- to '10+.


I dont really know what to expect on my dyno run tuesday but I was hoping for something above 300hp, we will see.......

Since the dynoed Volant shows 297rwhp I am hoping my muffler may add an extra 3rwhp to give me 300 rwhp if that is what I should expect.

Truthfully I was hoping to get around 325 rwhp but it doesnt look like I will be pushing that much. I guess I will be happy with 300+ and averaging 15mpg in the end.
 

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Hey no fair mine is silver too and I dont think I got that much, maybe they change the hue in the silvers color
from '09- to '10+.


I dont really know what to expect on my dyno run tuesday but I was hoping for something above 300hp, we will see.......

Since the dynoed Volant shows 297rwhp I am hoping my muffler may add an extra 3rwhp to give me 300 rwhp if that is what I should expect.

Truthfully I was hoping to get around 325 rwhp but it doesnt look like I will be pushing that much. I guess I will be happy with 300+ and averaging 15mpg in the end.
im thinking you will have closer to 400 hp man????
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Yeah maybe I can rip out the engine to do an engine dyno then throw it back in so I can fudge my numbers to look better.

Who knows maybe I will be the first to hit 1,000hp:eek:
:bounce:
 

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The 2010 Tundra Double Cab 4X4 is a 4-door, up to 6-passenger full size pickup, available in 9 trims, ranging from the Tundra-Grade 4.6L to the Limited 5.7L FFV. Upon introduction, the Tundra-Grade 4.6L is equipped with a standard 4.6-liter, V8, 310-horsepower engine that achieves 14-mpg in the city and 19-mpg on the highway. The Limited 5.7L FFV is equipped with a standard 5.7-liter, V8, 381-horsepower, flexible fuel engine that achieves 13-mpg in the city and 17-mpg on the highway. A 6-Speed automatic transmission with overdrive is standard on both trims. The 2010 Tundra Double Cab 4X4 is a carryover from 2009.
 

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The 381 is at the crank Beericus. He's talking about at the rear wheels(rwhp).

Nice write ups xetreme. I made a screen to keep debris out of my volant, it also made up that gap. I had also enlarged the fender well hole to match up better with the intake.
 

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A small plastic bag had gotten sucked up into my CAI and was wrapped around my filter, so I made this to prevent that from happening again.





Very easy to make. Everything is aluminum and was cut with a pair of scissors. I had put clear silicon between the halves to prevent leaks. I had also let it cure for about 10 days. This was done because the silicon was putting out a vapor and I did not want to throw codes.
 

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Discussion Starter #17 (Edited)
AlGolfer69, I have some meshing in my garage that is a bit finer than yours but I will try it out and let you know my results,

the only difference I will do is use that heavy duty heat barrier stuff with a sticky side on it, and that will hold the screen in place but also help deflect any additional heat from around the edges.

thanks for the added info and pics.
 

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No problem. I used some 3m tape 360 degrees and stuck it on the inner fender.
 
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