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well no wonder, the truck they tested was a crewmax...
 

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Whats with all the subjective stuff? The hard numbers point to the Tundra.
Plus, in 10 years what is the Tundra worth against the rest of them...If they are still running...
 

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I love it how they chose an SR5 to compete over competitors top-of-the-line models. Just showing how the SR5 can easily match-up their best-of-the-best, more so the LIMITED!!!!!
 

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I haven't looked at GM lately, but is the 6.2 their standard motor in the 1/2 tons? I didn't know they got away from the 5.3, I don't think with that motor they would even show up to the track. IMO
 

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Me too! I just thought that the older 6.0 only came in heavy duty models, it would be typical of GM to try and manipulate their stock 1/2 ton with their heavy duty model.
 

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i thought this was goofy...tundra has the fastest loaded time, but not the fastest unloaded...



 

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Discussion Starter #17
I loved this test result !

The Ford F-150 and Toyota Tundra performed best. They were the only trucks to make it off the slippery surface without having to stop and engage four-wheel drive. The F-150’s traction was superior to the Tundra’s. While the F-150’s wheels did slip, the truck was able to cut throttle smoothly and apply selective braking until grip was restored and it was able to climb the basalt. The Tundra cut throttle too, but very aggressively. It took pushing the accelerator all the way to the floor to keep throttle up while the Tundra slowly crawled off the pad. Both the Tundra and F-150 had rear limited-slip differentials. They were also the heaviest trucks we tested, which likely helped.

The Chevrolet Silverado and GMC Sierra both had locking mechanical rear differentials that engaged automatically when wheel slip hit a certain rpm. While both pickups performed excellently in the autocross, they were challenged by the wet surface and fishtailed backward as power was applied. We had to put both trucks into 4-High to get off the basalt.

The Dodge Ram 1500 also required the use of 4-High to escape the split-mu surface, but like the F-150 and Tundra it has a rear limited-slip differential. To us, this was proof that extra weight and, particularly, excellent anti-slip logic can make a big difference getting a truck out of slick conditions
The Nissan Titan was the most challenged by this test. When its electronic-locking rear differential wasn’t engaged (which only happens in four-wheel drive) the rear diff operated as an open differential, meaning there was no way to shift power or lock up the slipping wheel. The engine quickly hit close to the redline as the Titan slipped backward and struggled to figure out a way off the hill before we cut power and engaged four-wheel drive to escape.

Another traction-control test we conducted involved driving the trucks straight up a wet jenite surface without stopping. Wet jenite has a coefficient of friction similar to an icy road. Almost all the trucks were able to make it up the jenite as long as forward momentum was maintained at 10 mph or more. Again, the Nissan Titan was the most challenged by this test; it required backing off the jenite and using 4-High.



And then this comment reply from the people that did the test :

@Chris: This test (with this particular result) took place at GM's Proving Grounds. There were GM staff on hand that watched. When GM repeated the same test with the same exact trucks we used after the Shootout, they saw the same results.
 

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^ funny last comment,dodge just did the same comparo at the old base in irvine.Im sure u will see another jokinn write up.....p.s. it took place 3 weeks ago.
 

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I don't get it....they said the f150 had everything BUT a powerful V8...it is a dam truck, a motor is one of if not the key component. Also look closely at the numbers, they gave every other truck a 3 at min on unloaded driving and the tundra a 1? But then loaded the Tundra goes up to a 3. Not saying it was rigged or anything but many of the numbers they figured do not make sense to me personally. Some of the categories are weird to, i.e. reciever hitch workability? wtf is that supposed to mean. Tundra got a 1 for that also.

Simply read the introduction for the Tundra. It is obviously and completely biased in terms of the f150. They admit it has more power and is faster but then say "O a year ago that power was impressive but not now" while BTW they said the f150 is really underpowered ?? I'm confused. If you read a lot of it they compare even other trucks to the f150 and say pretty much flat out that the truck was better at doing X than the f150 but that they liked the f150 more for some dumb reason and not because it did the job better.

Also why not use a fully loaded trailer such as a 10k lb one? Too much for the FI suspension of the ram?aw. Or could the f150 not even get over 10 mph with a trailer like that with it's girly motor.

I don't take many of those test comparisons to seriously since things such as ride comfort are personal preference and to me the tundra is the smoothest truck I have ever ridden in or driven. Also I know that my truck will easily carry and pull far more than I would feel comfortable driving with behind me down the road. Take into account customer service, reliability, resale value, and looks even and I am 100% happy with my choice.
 
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