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This statement should read "do Roadmaster active suspension and be done with it." With RAS you make the initial adjustment at the time of install and that's it. With Air Bags pressure adjustments must be maintained according to the load. An air compressor is needed, onboard or otherwise, and while you're on the road if an airbag fails, vehicle control is compromised. No thanks. The positives of RAS far outweigh the negatives...of which I've found none! Let's roll.
For 365.00 for the air bag kit and 385.00 for the compressor kit with dual zone controller.....lots of money.

I always went two separate lines since check valves were not what I wanted in an air system. What a pain in the ass. The air bags rarely fail, it is usually the line or connector. The only time air bags are damaged is off-roading or putting the truck on a lift and drooping out the suspension.

I actually like this setup after doing a little research.
 

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Discussion Starter #22 (Edited)
Though we haven't decided on an ultralite TT yet, but because of all the positive reviews on the Roadmaster Active Suspension system, I want to get the RAS on my truck sooner than later and experience the WOW factor myself. Back in the day we used traction bars on our muscle cars (1968 Roadrunner); this TDR Pro will/should put down the power and handle a lot better in the corners with RAS. I'm stoked! Thanks Nolan for checking in with Tundra Talk.
 

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This statement should read "do Roadmaster active suspension and be done with it." With RAS you make the initial adjustment at the time of install and that's it. With Air Bags pressure adjustments must be maintained according to the load. An air compressor is needed, onboard or otherwise, and while you're on the road if an airbag fails, vehicle control is compromised. No thanks. The positives of RAS far outweigh the negatives...of which I've found none! Let's roll.
wow, you make it sound like air bags are complicated. The onboard compressor is not needed and these bags don't fail..I'm level until I hook up to my trailer. I then add approx 10-15 psi of air and then I'm back to level. When I'm done towing I let the air out of the bags. Also if I carry more weight in the bed I simply add a little bit of air. That active suspension thingy looks like a glorified overload spring. Guaranteed to change the ride and no way to fine tune the ride height...Good luck with it.
 

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Discussion Starter #24
wow, you make it sound like air bags are complicated. The onboard compressor is not needed and these bags don't fail..I'm level until I hook up to my trailer. I then add approx 10-15 psi of air and then I'm back to level. When I'm done towing I let the air out of the bags. Also if I carry more weight in the bed I simply add a little bit of air. That active suspension thingy looks like a glorified overload spring. Guaranteed to change the ride and no way to fine tune the ride height...Good luck with it.
I'm glad that the air bags work well for you, however when dealing with air, you have the potential to run into leaks, damaged air line, holes in air springs etc., and you must maintain a minimum psi. I prefer a mechanical system that is adjustable, and RAS is state of the art. If I don't like it, I take it off and try air. No harm, no foul.
 

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I'm glad that the air bags work well for you, however when dealing with air, you have the potential to run into leaks, damaged air line, holes in air springs etc., and you must maintain a minimum psi. I prefer a mechanical system that is adjustable, and RAS is state of the art. If I don't like it, I take it off and try air. No harm, no foul.
It's all good, I'm just stating my actual experience with the air bags. It appears that if you have a heavy load in the bed or a heavy tongue then you tighten down the Active Suspension with a wrench ? Is that correct because there is no way it can be installed and left alone because of the different weight loads. Let me know your thoughts on that.
 

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Discussion Starter #26
RAS adjustment

Hi Jeremyd: I appreciate you sharing your actual experience with A/Bags. In regards to the RAS adjustment question - here's a typical response from a Ford forum, Quote:

"Ordered a Roadmaster Active Suspension for the '13 F150 SCREW. Was very easy to install. Hardest part was getting the truck up in the air, putting jack stands underneath it and having the stands high enough for the suspension to drop. Only had 2 nuts to tighten on the u-bolts when connecting to the present leaf springs. After that, all I had to do was tighten the spring nut so either 1 of 2 disks supplied with the kit, slips in between the spring coils.

Raised the truck by about 1/4 inch and eliminated the 2" sag I had when hooked to the 5th wheel. Still have a smooth ride with and without the 5th wheel hooked up. Also eliminated the axle wrap and shudder I experienced when taking off from a standstill. It also adds an additional 2500 lb capacity to truck. Easy project for any shade tree mechanic." Unquote.

The RAS is passive and active when the truck is loaded, but the stability is always there without stiffing the ride. Pretty cool. I'm attaching a photo of a guy inserting a quarter (2mm) between the coils during the install. If after the install a change is preferred, the truck must be lifted onto safety stands so the springs are unloaded and the adjustment is made.

So that's it. A Google search will pull up a lot of outstanding reviews on this setup.
 

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Hi Jeremyd: I appreciate you sharing your actual experience with A/Bags. In regards to the RAS adjustment question - here's a typical response from a Ford forum, Quote:

"Ordered a Roadmaster Active Suspension for the '13 F150 SCREW. Was very easy to install. Hardest part was getting the truck up in the air, putting jack stands underneath it and having the stands high enough for the suspension to drop. Only had 2 nuts to tighten on the u-bolts when connecting to the present leaf springs. After that, all I had to do was tighten the spring nut so either 1 of 2 disks supplied with the kit, slips in between the spring coils.

Raised the truck by about 1/4 inch and eliminated the 2" sag I had when hooked to the 5th wheel. Still have a smooth ride with and without the 5th wheel hooked up. Also eliminated the axle wrap and shudder I experienced when taking off from a standstill. It also adds an additional 2500 lb capacity to truck. Easy project for any shade tree mechanic." Unquote.

The RAS is passive and active when the truck is loaded, but the stability is always there without stiffing the ride. Pretty cool. I'm attaching a photo of a guy inserting a quarter (2mm) between the coils during the install. If after the install a change is preferred, the truck must be lifted onto safety stands so the springs are unloaded and the adjustment is made.

So that's it. A Google search will pull up a lot of outstanding reviews on this setup.
Alright, I definitely agree it will help with axle wrap it's just like old school traction bars..Keeping in mind that as far as I know newer Tundras don't have axle wrap issues. But the height adjustment will certainly be an issue if you want it perfectly level depending on the weight you are carrying at the time. You simply add air with a 12 volt bicycle compressor. 10 psi will easily raise my rear 2 inches.. As far as leaks go, I have never had any. The air lines are routed above the angle iron of the frame along with the other wiring completely out of the way. Anyways if you don't mind spending 350 bucks twice then I say go for it. I'm still looking for that money tree in my backyard...It's definitely good info on both types for people on this board.;)
 

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Being in the industry and talking to shop owners all across the country, the air bags set ups are generally a solid product. I know for a fact that has worked well for many people, that's fine!:beerchug: Many never have issues, however, from getting feedback from shop owners installers etc, having leakages/ failures is definitely not unheard of. (some now actually shy away from selling/installing because of previous experiences)

All that aside, from a strictly load leveling performance standpoint, the air bag setup with on-board compressor is a pretty neat set up. As long as you prepared to spend $1100-$1800 for complete set and install at a shop.(unless you have the time, patience and ability to do it yourself) Without that on board compressor, the inconvenience factor creates buyers remorse for many.


Improved loaded and unloaded ride quality, stability and handling are the RAS' best attributes. It's what really differentiates us from typical overload type springs, the feel and outcome is just completely different. Greatly improved safety and stability on passenger vans is the reason Salvation Army and major church insurance companies have tested and require or recommend the RAS. Eyeing it or even watching a video, I could see why somebody might believe that the RAS could only negatively affect ride quality. The more down force or weight applied to each spring, the more the RAS responds. This is why it's set it and forget it, no readjustment needed.

From the outside looking in, I understand skepticism of new(ish) or different products(hell, I was skeptical when they first came out with those funny looking touchscreen phones:D). At the end of the day, it's really one of those things that just works.

Good luck to everybody looking for some sort of suspension help!
 

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Being in the industry and talking to shop owners all across the country, the air bags set ups are generally a solid product. I know for a fact that has worked well for many people, that's fine!:beerchug: Many never have issues, however, from getting feedback from shop owners installers etc, having leakages/ failures is definitely not unheard of. (some now actually shy away from selling/installing because of previous experiences)

All that aside, from a strictly load leveling performance standpoint, the air bag setup with on-board compressor is a pretty neat set up. As long as you prepared to spend $1100-$1800 for complete set and install at a shop.(unless you have the time, patience and ability to do it yourself) Without that on board compressor, the inconvenience factor creates buyers remorse for many.


Improved loaded and unloaded ride quality, stability and handling are the RAS' best attributes. It's what really differentiates us from typical overload type springs, the feel and outcome is just completely different. Greatly improved safety and stability on passenger vans is the reason Salvation Army and major church insurance companies have tested and require or recommend the RAS. Eyeing it or even watching a video, I could see why somebody might believe that the RAS could only negatively affect ride quality. The more down force or weight applied to each spring, the more the RAS responds. This is why it's set it and forget it, no readjustment needed.

From the outside looking in, I understand skepticism of new(ish) or different products(hell, I was skeptical when they first came out with those funny looking touchscreen phones:D). At the end of the day, it's really one of those things that just works.

Good luck to everybody looking for some sort of suspension help![/QUOTE

Whoa ! back up, 1100-1800 dollars ??? Air bags for a Tundra are approx 350 bucks and an 8th grader could install them...I will say it again, The Active Suspension System is nothing more than a Overload Spring with two ubolts. Yes it will help with axle wrap but common sense here tells me that if you tighten down on the adjusting nuts it will indeed change the stiffness in the rear. But don't believe me even though I had an overload spring installed back in the day..Good luck..
 

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Whoa ! back up, 1100-1800 dollars ??? Air bags for a Tundra are approx 350 bucks and an 8th grader could install them...I will say it again, The Active Suspension System is nothing more than a Overload Spring with two ubolts. Yes it will help with axle wrap but common sense here tells me that if you tighten down on the adjusting nuts it will indeed change the stiffness in the rear. But don't believe me even though I had an overload spring installed back in the day..Good luck..
Agreed... If you run it tight enough to defeat axle wrap, then the RAS will resist any bend in the leaf, thus making the rear stiffer.

Whether it is stiffer enough to significantly impact the unloaded ride - That is the question. We need some volunteer guinea pigs!

I'll try one if offered at a huge discount, and report back. Will return it if I don't like it, and will give positive review if I do...
I have a 5000lb boat to tow as well...
:D
 

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Being in the industry and talking to shop owners all across the country, the air bags set ups are generally a solid product. I know for a fact that has worked well for many people, that's fine!:beerchug: Many never have issues, however, from getting feedback from shop owners installers etc, having leakages/ failures is definitely not unheard of. (some now actually shy away from selling/installing because of previous experiences)

All that aside, from a strictly load leveling performance standpoint, the air bag setup with on-board compressor is a pretty neat set up. As long as you prepared to spend $1100-$1800 for complete set and install at a shop.(unless you have the time, patience and ability to do it yourself) Without that on board compressor, the inconvenience factor creates buyers remorse for many.


Improved loaded and unloaded ride quality, stability and handling are the RAS' best attributes. It's what really differentiates us from typical overload type springs, the feel and outcome is just completely different. Greatly improved safety and stability on passenger vans is the reason Salvation Army and major church insurance companies have tested and require or recommend the RAS. Eyeing it or even watching a video, I could see why somebody might believe that the RAS could only negatively affect ride quality. The more down force or weight applied to each spring, the more the RAS responds. This is why it's set it and forget it, no readjustment needed.

From the outside looking in, I understand skepticism of new(ish) or different products(hell, I was skeptical when they first came out with those funny looking touchscreen phones:D). At the end of the day, it's really one of those things that just works.

Good luck to everybody looking for some sort of suspension help![/QUOTE

Whoa ! back up, 1100-1800 dollars ??? Air bags for a Tundra are approx 350 bucks and an 8th grader could install them...I will say it again, The Active Suspension System is nothing more than a Overload Spring with two ubolts. Yes it will help with axle wrap but common sense here tells me that if you tighten down on the adjusting nuts it will indeed change the stiffness in the rear. But don't believe me even though I had an overload spring installed back in the day..Good luck..
1100 to 1800..... let's break that down.
Bags 350+ shop markup = 400

Compressor and controler 450 + shop markup = 500

Install 3 hours at 75$/hr =300

400+500+300 = $1200

1100 to 1800 Looks about right to me.
 

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Honestly I tow with my truck and I have the following setup

Airlift Bags w Daystar Cradles and Dakar (OME) leafs.... and I have 0 issues and I have full suspension travel thanks to the cradles.

 

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You can have payload, or a car like ride, can't have both. Truck manufacturers across the board keep trying to build trucks to ride like cars, they've succeeded in that, however you can't haul or tow anything without bottoming out LOL.

A weight distribution hitch, and air bags seem to be the common fixes. Some of the airbag systems they have are pretty nice, the setup my boss has the airbags sense a load and automatically inflate, they deflate when the load is removed. Pretty cool setup.
Willbill,

I agree and understand that ride and payload are competing characteristics and by no means am I an engineer.

However, my '05 2500 Duramax rode as good or better than my 14 Tundra...therefore, I don't see why there isn't enough "room" to improve the Tundra's payload by 500lbs or so and not negatively impact the ride quality.

Cheers,

Frank
 

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Willbill,

I agree and understand that ride and payload are competing characteristics and by no means am I an engineer.

However, my '05 2500 Duramax rode as good or better than my 14 Tundra...therefore, I don't see why there isn't enough "room" to improve the Tundra's payload by 500lbs or so and not negatively impact the ride quality.

Cheers,

Frank
My guess would be cost cutting...not that that makes any sense either considering the prices Toyota puts on these trucks, but I'm guessing $$$$ is the biggest thing. There have been people on here overloading their trucks for years, and haven't reported any structural damage that I can recall. The trucks are capable, but it comes down to reliability. What is the truck rated for, and what happens in an accident where you have overload the truck...that's the problem :(. An HD package, or heck a 3/4 or 1 ton tundra would be awesome and it would get me back to the dealer looking for another truck LOL.
 

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Discussion Starter #39
Air bags do work

I'm a tower also, thumbs up for air bags if you wanna fix some squat.
I've got a buddy with a '05 GMC 2500 HD, and airbags were his solution for a sagging rear end when hooked up to his 30' TT. AIRBAGS do have their place, and from the looks of your photo, they work well for you. Outstanding!
 

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Toyota ought to have a solution for this very real issue. A towing package, integrated controller, but not really a practical tow vehicle as stock? Our 07 drove better with a light tow (say 3500#) than unladen.
 
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