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You don't have to buy into it, you don't have to believe it, I don't really care. However, when someone asks a question like this it is ridiculous how the towing wizards go off on those of us who do understand the numbers and the liability and we are called the tow police. Some common sense would go a long way here.
You keep skirting the issue. I'm not talking about towing. The Tundra is rated to tow something crazy like 10,000lb. I'm talking about weight that is *on* the truck, and the rating for this is somewhere in the 1,000-1,500lb range.

Will a Tundra hauling 2,000lb in the bed (with beefed up suspension) be inferior in handling and stopping compared to one hauling a 10,000lb trailer? Or a big RV? Or big truck? Or a tractor trailer?

The answer in every case is an emphatic no. The Tundra hauling a load will be much better. Yet all these are common on the roads. It is *not* a safety issue! You can question whether or not the Tundra frame and axle are strong enough to haul the load, but that's a reliability issue. And the fact that so many are doing it without problems (while flying down rough dirt roads) should put your mind at ease.
 

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Do yourself and your family a favor and stick with your initial impression which is absolutely correct. Just because a ton of people on this forum choose to completely ignore the ratings of the truck does not change the facts. With that said, if you were to be a couple hundred pounds over your payload then that is reasonable. Just don't be the guy who puts 2000 pounds on the truck, disguises it with suspension changes and says that everything is great. If the Tundra could safely handle that load then Toyota would rate it as such and sell a bunch more Tundra's. There are a ton of factors that go into payload ratings, brakes being just one of them. Yes, the Tundra has large brakes but it has to because it is heavier than most 1/2 ton trucks. Do some research, despite the larger brakes, the Tundra takes longer to stop than every other 1/2 ton I have seen. Many on here will tell you weight is not a problem since they have not had any problems. You can listen to them or you can rely on the very well paid and educated engineers who designed and rated the truck; your choice.
^ this is a good post here OP
 

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I guess I'm dumb but, I always thought...

2240 lbs = 1 ton therefore 1120 lbs = 1/2 ton Half-ton is actually the trucks capability.....and this includes everything in the truck.

Even all the big butts it's carrying. ;)
 

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It's crazy in the domestic 3 truck forums. Everyone brags about how much they can carry and or tow. You come here and everyone instantly recommends a 3/4 truck. I'll never understand Toyota owners.
That's not entirely true

I owned a ram 1/2 ton and belonged and still belong to ram forum and those guys are pretty much just like here, not much difference

That's said since they sell more heavier trucks and a lot more of them there are more guys that tow
 

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I guess I'm dumb but, I always thought...

2240 lbs = 1 ton therefore 1120 lbs = 1/2 ton Half-ton is actually the trucks capability.....and this includes everything in the truck.

Even all the big butts it's carrying. ;)
Not far off, most crewmax trucks are not much more than that, and that's before we add all our mods to it

Although getting rid of all that chrome has to add payload , hehe>:D
 

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You keep skirting the issue. I'm not talking about towing. The Tundra is rated to tow something crazy like 10,000lb. I'm talking about weight that is *on* the truck, and the rating for this is somewhere in the 1,000-1,500lb range.

Will a Tundra hauling 2,000lb in the bed (with beefed up suspension) be inferior in handling and stopping compared to one hauling a 10,000lb trailer? Or a big RV? Or big truck? Or a tractor trailer?

The answer in every case is an emphatic no. The Tundra hauling a load will be much better. Yet all these are common on the roads. It is *not* a safety issue! You can question whether or not the Tundra frame and axle are strong enough to haul the load, but that's a reliability issue. And the fact that so many are doing it without problems (while flying down rough dirt roads) should put your mind at ease.
I am hoping that you are a very young man because it is obvious that your desire to be right interferes with your ability to think logically. I have not skirted any issue, rather, if you go back and read what I wrote I clearly stated that the capacities on your Tundra are established for liability reasons, not for reliability reasons. Liability is another way of saying Toyota believes operating the vehicle above each capacity is unsafe, negligent and dangerous; therefore, they are absolving themselves of all liability and placing it on you. There is also a reason why you see separate payload and towing capacities; you cannot compare apples and zebras as you are trying to do. The physics involved in hauling weight vs. pulling weight are completely different. In any case, I am not going to continue the conversation. You have your opinion. I have facts. We will just have to choose to disagree.
 

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That's not entirely true



I owned a ram 1/2 ton and belonged and still belong to ram forum and those guys are pretty much just like here, not much difference



That's said since they sell more heavier trucks and a lot more of them there are more guys that tow


I've never noticed it, but then I don't frequent those forums often. Just basic searching.
 

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I am hoping that you are a very young man because it is obvious that your desire to be right interferes with your ability to think logically.
Nice condescension. In reality I'm an old, retired aerospace engineer. IQ of 160+. Tell me about logic. :banghead:

I have not skirted any issue, rather, if you go back and read what I wrote I clearly stated that the capacities on your Tundra are established for liability reasons, not for reliability reasons. Liability is another way of saying Toyota believes operating the vehicle above each capacity is unsafe, negligent and dangerous; therefore, they are absolving themselves of all liability and placing it on you.
You invented that. A Tundra with a 2k payload is way safer than a lot of legal vehicles on the road. And a Tundra pulling a 10k trailer is a hell of a lot more dangerous than hauling a load. So use some logic. Whatever is going on, it can't be what you believe.

There is also a reason why you see separate payload and towing capacities; you cannot compare apples and zebras as you are trying to do. The physics involved in hauling weight vs. pulling weight are completely different. In any case, I am not going to continue the conversation. You have your opinion. I have facts. We will just have to choose to disagree.
Physics are not on your side. You don't have to be a rocket scientist to see it. I'm trying to make it real simple for you. Your belief is easily falsified. So what are the alternatives?
 

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Says it's for a 1/2 ton truck but, it sure seems like a lot of weight to me.
1700lb dry.

The camper I'm building will be ~700lb for the shell, and hopefully ~1000lb with "furniture" and storage (also light and custom). And the bed is being removed which will save 400lb. But still there is going to be over 1000lb of people and stuff (for long term living), so even I'll be over gross weight.
 

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Discussion Starter #32
Hmmmm...I was curious so I searched for slide in campers and found this.

Lance 650 Truck Camper - Half ton owners rejoice!

Says it's for a 1/2 ton truck but, it sure seems like a lot of weight to me.
Nice camper but with a wet weight of 1900 lbs it would be over 2,000 by the time you add several people and supplies etc.
Much as I love my truck I see that you can get an F-150 with up to 2,900 lbs payload (have to get special payload package though)
 

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Much as I love my truck I see that you can get an F-150 with up to 2,900 lbs payload (have to get special payload package though)
Do you know what they upgrade to get it that high?

Looked it up: "The package increases payload to 3,300 pounds for the V-8 and 2,900 pounds for the EcoBoost. The heavy payload package includes five LT245/70R17E BSW A/T tires for the XL; five LT275/65R18C OWL A/T tires for the XLT or Lariat; 17-inch silver steel heavy-duty wheels for the XL; 18-inch silver aluminum heavy-duty wheels for the XLT or Lariat; upgraded springs and auxiliary transmission oil cooler; and a 9.75-inch gear set with 3.73 electronic-locking slip axle."

Nothing special.
 

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Ya that's really lame to market that to 1/2 ton owners at 1900 before you even get in the truck

Very very few 1/2 tons won't be overloaded (legitimately anyways) by the time they actually hit the road, I think that heavy payload ford may be the only one not overloaded
 

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rruff;8728418

Nice condescension. In reality I'm an old, retired aerospace engineer. IQ of 160+. Tell me about logic. :banghead:




@2010 I know a few super smart guys that have zero common sense


Anyone who touts their internet IQ score and their multiple degrees most likely falls in that category.
 

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Do logic, reality, and "common sense" coincide? Or do you mean the "common sense" of accepted belief?
 

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Do logic, reality, and "common sense" coincide? Or do you mean the "common sense" of accepted belief?


Logic typically only works in fantasy worlds, rarely does it actually apply to real life unfortunately.

Going off of facts and real numbers is a much better way to go about things. I can use logic and make pretty much any statement sound good.

Do some real world testing with clear and precise numbers and measurements and let us know what you come up with ( Toyota already did all this ). Without the facts, your logic is useless.
 

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Here is some food for thought on payload cap. I'm working on a 2014 compact sedan, a VW Jetta if you will. The car weighs in at like 3000 lbs and has a 1.8 liter engine. The door says the payload shall not exceed 1087 lbs.

So you are telling me that this tiny car with tiny shocks, a four cylinder engine, and a transmission that can't hold much more torque than what it's already handling, can haul ALMOST as much as a full size Tundra???
 

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I can use logic and make pretty much any statement sound good.
Your "made up statement" won't sound good to me or anyone who understands rational thinking. Going off facts and numbers *is* logical. Observation, science, reasoning and logical inference.

If you propose that Toyota's payload and tow ratings are set according to safety, then there is very compelling evidence to prove you wrong. You may ignore it, but logic, reason, evidence, and common sense are not on your side.
 

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Your "made up statement" won't sound good to me or anyone who understands rational thinking. Going off facts and numbers *is* logical. Observation, science, reasoning and logical inference.

If you propose that Toyota's payload and tow ratings are set according to safety, then there is very compelling evidence to prove you wrong. You may ignore it, but logic, reason, evidence, and common sense are not on your side.


I never said it was all to do with safety. I'm sure that is part of why toyota puts that rating on the truck. I'm sure it has more of a liability factor than anything.

Yes it is logical to go off of facts, but logic without facts is useless. Your circular logic with no basis of fact is what is illogical and theoretically incorrect.

It still doesn't matter. The truck is rated for X payload. Anything above that is not advisable to exceed due to legal and or safety issues that may arise if you do have something go south. The tundra will most likely handle way more weight but what happens in an accident? I'm not going to find out.
 
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