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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi folks, I have been considering a FWC Hawk pop up truck camper for my 2012 Double Cab 4.6 Tundra. Working on the assumption that my truck had a payload capacity of 1515 lbs and the Hawk camper weighed in at just under 1,000 lbs I felt that the combination would work out plus I have seen photos of quite a few Tundras with these campers on them. Anyhow, the other day I looked at the info plate on the B pillar of my truck and it states " The combined weight of occupants and cargo should never exceed 1255 lbs". Now I'm a little confused. Am I missing something here? Just yesterday I saw a Toyota chart online that should the payload of my truck as 1515 to 1640 lbs or thereabouts (I assume the lower figure is for the 4.6, higher for 5.8?)
Anyhow, any input is greatly appreciated.
Thanks,
Alan
 

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GCVWR is the number specifically for that truck based on it's build when it roll off the line. So, 1255 your number.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
GCVWR is the number specifically for that truck based on it's build when it roll off the line. So, 1255 your number.
Shoot, that's what I was afraid of. Might have to look at getting another truck, maybe a new Tundra, at least that should give me the 1515 - 1640 range.
Thanks for your response.
 

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Whatever truck you choose, I would advise only using advertised numbers as a starting point. Always go straight to the door sticker
 

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Later Tundras won't have more capacity. My 2014 is 1360 lbs on the door sticker, but I also don't have the 38 gallon tank. Don't think it'll be worth it to get another Tundra... Likely looking at a 3/4 ton or 1-ton if you're wanting more. And don't even bother with a 3/4 ton; go straight to a 1-ton single-rear-wheel truck; most of the 3/4 and 1-ton's from the big 3 have the same suspension between a 3/4 and a 1-ton so ride difference isn't significant. The 1-ton will ride rougher on the test drive though due to the higher PSI in the tires. But the tires will be the same as the 3/4 ton; just higher PSI. And the 1-ton will have an easy 1000 lbs+ payload over the 3/4 ton. At least for GM/Ford, that all rings true. Not totally sure on Dodge because never again, lol.
 

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You need to weigh your truck. My '16 has a GVWR of 7200LB. My last weigh in, I was at 6200LB. That leaves me with 1000LB of Payload to play with.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks guys,
As I am new to camping with a camper I have decided to rent for the first trip and see how we like it. If we are still sold on the idea of a truck and camper combo I will upgrade to a 3/4 ton. Shame as I really like Tundras.

Alan
 

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Working on the assumption that my truck had a payload capacity of 1515 lbs and the Hawk camper weighed in at just under 1,000 lbs I felt that the combination would work out plus I have seen photos of quite a few Tundras with these campers on them.
If you beef up the suspension (which you surely will) you can safely and reliably haul a lot more than the sticker says. That's why you see a lot of people doing it. Plenty of people hauling 2500lb loads on washboard for hundreds of thousands of miles without issue.

The biggest benefit you'd get with a 3/4 ton is a full floating rear axle, and suspension already beefed up, but you'd have to by a Ford, Chevy, or Dodge. I know which one I picked. >:D
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
If you beef up the suspension (which you surely will) you can safely and reliably haul a lot more than the sticker says. That's why you see a lot of people doing it. Plenty of people hauling 2500lb loads on washboard for hundreds of thousands of miles without issue.

The biggest benefit you'd get with a 3/4 ton is a full floating rear axle, and suspension already beefed up, but you'd have to by a Ford, Chevy, or Dodge. I know which one I picked. >:D
I was under the impression that beefing up the suspension with extra springs and airbags didn't really increase the payload much if at all. Aren't the brakes a main consideration as well?
Thanks,
Alan
 

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If you beef up the suspension (which you surely will) you can safely and reliably haul a lot more than the sticker says. That's why you see a lot of people doing it. Plenty of people hauling 2500lb loads on washboard for hundreds of thousands of miles without issue.



The biggest benefit you'd get with a 3/4 ton is a full floating rear axle, and suspension already beefed up, but you'd have to by a Ford, Chevy, or Dodge. I know which one I picked. >:D

And I got rid of my RAM 2500 CTD and got a Tundra, before that turbo went out. >:D



Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
 

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I was under the impression that beefing up the suspension with extra springs and airbags didn't really increase the payload much if at all. Aren't the brakes a main consideration as well?
The Tundra has a very strong braking system.

Look at it this way, will you be safer and have better control while hauling a 2,000lb load, or pulling a 10,000lb trailer? The difference is really amazing actually, yet the trailer is in spec and the camper isn't.
 

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I was under the impression that beefing up the suspension with extra springs and airbags didn't really increase the payload much if at all.
Thanks,
Alan
Correct, you can't increase payload legitimately from what comes from factory
 

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I was under the impression that beefing up the suspension with extra springs and airbags didn't really increase the payload much if at all. Aren't the brakes a main consideration as well?
Thanks,
Alan
Do yourself and your family a favor and stick with your initial impression which is absolutely correct. Just because a ton of people on this forum choose to completely ignore the ratings of the truck does not change the facts. With that said, if you were to be a couple hundred pounds over your payload then that is reasonable. Just don't be the guy who puts 2000 pounds on the truck, disguises it with suspension changes and says that everything is great. If the Tundra could safely handle that load then Toyota would rate it as such and sell a bunch more Tundra's. There are a ton of factors that go into payload ratings, brakes being just one of them. Yes, the Tundra has large brakes but it has to because it is heavier than most 1/2 ton trucks. Do some research, despite the larger brakes, the Tundra takes longer to stop than every other 1/2 ton I have seen. Many on here will tell you weight is not a problem since they have not had any problems. You can listen to them or you can rely on the very well paid and educated engineers who designed and rated the truck; your choice.
 

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It's crazy in the domestic 3 truck forums. Everyone brags about how much they can carry and or tow. You come here and everyone instantly recommends a 3/4 truck. I'll never understand Toyota owners.
 

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Do yourself and your family a favor and stick with your initial impression which is absolutely correct.... You can listen to them or you can rely on the very well paid and educated engineers who designed and rated the truck; your choice.
STOP PRETENDING THIS IS A SAFETY ISSUE!!!

It has nothing to do with safety. There are millions of legal vehicles on the road that are much less maneuverable, take longer to stop, and are in greater danger of flipping over, than a Tundra with a 2,000lb load. All those big RVs for instance. Big trucks. Tractor trailer rigs. Pretty much anybody pulling a trailer. I'll put a 2,000lb camper on mine and you can pull a 10,000lb trailer with yours, and we'll put them through a road test, eh?

The load rating is the warranty limit. If you haul more than that, Toyota can deny a warranty for any parts that might fail because of it. The main reason the rating is low is because the springs and shocks are designed for a smooth ride with no load. Beefing up the suspension doesn't improve the "rating" (which is cast in stone), but it sure as hell increases the amount of weight you can safely and reliably carry.
 

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Getting a little worked up and you are clueless. The next time you "yell" at me with your nice bold text I'll get rid of you.
:) I guess there needs to be some perks with the job... :bump:

If I'm clueless then prove it. Did you pay any attention to what I said? It isn't a safety issue and it couldn't possibly be. So the only "favor he'd be doing for his family" by buying a 3/4 ton is subjecting them to an unreliable POS.
 
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:) I guess there needs to be some perks with the job... :bump:

If I'm clueless then prove it. Did you pay any attention to what I said? It isn't a safety issue and it couldn't possibly be. So the only "favor he'd be doing for his family" by buying a 3/4 ton is subjecting them to an unreliable POS.
First off, banning you is not a "perk" of any kind, I would have said the same thing to you if you could not have a civil conversation with another member without going ape-shit and yelling at them. Yes, I read your post and many more just like them and I often wonder where you towing wizards come up with your so called facts. Toyota (and all other manufacturers) don't put ratings on vehicles so they they can deny warranty claims. Will they deny a claim if they find out you were driving around 800 pounds over payload; probably.

They do it because they know what each component on the vehicle is designed to tolerate and therefore (this is the important part) how much liability they are willing to take on. When manufacturers put those pretty little stickers on your vehicle and then dedicate 20 pages in the owner's manual to explain those numbers what they are doing is resolving themselves of liability when someone, such as yourself, decides to intentionally go beyond those numbers because you are smarter than the engineers who designed the vehicle. You seem to think that upgrading suspension overcomes all evils. Meanwhile, your front axle is rated for 4000 pounds and your rear axle is rated for 4150 pounds, your wheel bearings are designed for the max weight rating of the truck, your brakes were specifically engineered to stop the max weight rating of the truck....on and on.

You don't have to buy into it, you don't have to believe it, I don't really care. However, when someone asks a question like this it is ridiculous how the towing wizards go off on those of us who do understand the numbers and the liability and we are called the tow police. Some common sense would go a long way here. There is a reason they sell trucks that are "bigger" and more capable than the Tundra and other 1/2 ton trucks. Yes, in most states (maybe all of them but I suspect CA has some rules) personal vehicles are not inspected and do not require permits in order to tow, however, it is only a matter of time before we all have to get permits and inspections and be subjected to similar rules as commercial drivers because the overloading of pickup trucks is becoming more and more common. I am not the "tow police" and don't pretend to be but people who are new to the game deserve to hear both sides and not just assume that the first guy that says "it towed the space shuttle" is a genius who should be followed.

Best of luck with your Tundra and your payload/towing. The odds say you will never have a problem. Personally, I don't like playing the odds with my life, my families life or others. My two cents for you to ignore.
 
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