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Discussion Starter #21 (Edited)
Update...

As a safety precaution I ended up replacing all Dorman 610-471 studs by the very same. Except this time I pressed them in place instead of the popular DIY pull/screw them in place.
Pressing them prevents stressing the studs above their safe limits.

Here's what I learned.

DON'T

Two studs broke only few days after the installation and couples miles offroad.

Must DO!!!
You can either use an expensive specialized tool or THIS inexpensive GearWrench 3916D Universal Ball Joint Separator




Pretty good job for 25-35 dollar tool. It didn't have problems to do all the 10 studs but I'm not sure it is able to do this task on a regular basis.



Oh and BTW there is only one place where these longer Dorman studs will go in/out without removing/loosing the hub.

The first one to go may need a little help but the following others will insert with your bare hands.

I have tried the properly replaced Studs on very rough terrain (holes, rocks, etc...) and none has broken since.
So as other mentioned, the initial failure was most likely due to improper installation.

You can enjoy your longer Dorman 610-471 studs safely as long as the are installed as they should (ie PRESSED)
 

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Excellent update and write-up! Thanks!


Update...

As a safety precaution I ended up replacing all Dorman 610-471 studs by the very same. Except this time I pressed them in place instead of the popular DIY pull/screw them in place.
Pressing them prevents stressing the studs above their safe limits.

Here's what I learned.

DON'T

Two studs broke only few days after the installation and couples miles offroad.

Must DO!!!
You can either use an expensive specialized tool or THIS inexpensive GearWrench 3916D Universal Ball Joint Separator




Pretty good job for 25-35 dollar tool. It didn't have problems to do all the 10 studs but I'm not sure it is able to do this task on a regular basis.



Oh and BTW there is only one place where these longer Dorman studs will go in/out without removing/loosing the hub.

The first one to go may need a little help but the following others will insert with your bare hands.

I have tried the properly replaced Studs on very rough terrain (holes, rocks, etc...) and none has broken since.
So as other mentioned, the initial failure was most likely due to improper installation.

You can enjoy your longer Dorman 610-471 studs safely as long as the are installed as they should (ie PRESSED)
 

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Discussion Starter #25 (Edited)
If those Dormans snap again, try ARP.. They cost 4 times as much, but they're quality is top notch.
Please provide Model No as the Dorman are longer and meant to solve the very short stock front studs. Are those ARP the same length as the stock Toyota's?
 

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Discussion Starter #27 (Edited)
Knurl diam Dorman 0.645 < Arp 0.660
Bolt 9/16 vs 5/8

And Arp 3" that's .5 inch longer than the already long Dorman. Probably too long for the stock wheels.

I like the Chrome moly of the Arp's but your suggestion is out of specs (too big, too long) - That's what she said!

I kind of recall looking up the ARP's and also kind of recall they didn't have anything for the new Tundras
 

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I was afraid someone would say that. I called my mechanic. He said these things are hardened. They don`t weaken. They either hold or snap.

Anyway. I`ll pay a very close attention for a while.
Unless your Mechanic shows you his PhD in Metallurgy, don't take his word for it.
Hardened materials fatigue and fail in all kinds of situations. The fact that 2 "hardened Studs already failed just proves my point.

Then again I've only been a Tool maker for 30yrs, what the hell would I know about metal?

Anywho...I wouldn't risk it.
 

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Discussion Starter #29
Unless your Mechanic shows you his PhD in Metallurgy, don't take his word for it.
Hardened materials fatigue and fail in all kinds of situations. The fact that 2 "hardened Studs already failed just proves my point.

Then again I've only been a Tool maker for 30yrs, what the hell would I know about metal?

Anywho...I wouldn't risk it.
I guess you didn't read until the end. That reply might have been relevant before I chose to change them all. By that also confirming that I was endorsing the idea of improper installation caused too much stress on the studs.
 

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So what spacers can safely be used with the OEM wheels just to get that wider stance look? 1.25 or 1.50 ? Thanks guys and I'm glad the OP did not get into an accident from a busted wheel stud.
 

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Discussion Starter #31 (Edited)
So what spacers can safely be used with the OEM wheels just to get that wider stance look? 1.25 or 1.50 ? Thanks guys and I'm glad the OP did not get into an accident from a busted wheel stud.
Brands folks often mentioned on forums.

Bora spacers
Spidertrax
Motorsport Tech
Toyota Wheel Spacers made in the United States

Mine are Motorsport Tech. Some folks here reported customer service issues with them. I don't know if it qualifies for safety and/or if it's related to a customer service problem. But the Motorsport Tech drilled holes for the studs leaves less threads than the stock wheels for the nuts. And since the OEM studs are rather short in the front, I was not comfortable with the amount of "turns" I could do to fix them. I called them and I told them I was able to do 6 turns. They give a naaahhh your fine answer. People here are saying random numbers between 4 and 8 turns. I guess the more the better until you reach the optimal amount. Customer service was on the middle of the range.

I found a more educated suggestion that said you should go in at least 1.5x the size of the diameter. In our case 9/16 x 1.5. I didn't measure it to see how many turns it means but I doubt the OEM studs were long enough to do that.

Most of theses spacers are aluminum. Is it safe to begin with? We don't hear many of them failing when installed properly.
Overtorque these and the cone fitting might go/sink deep enough in the spacer to kill the spacer capacity to hold the wheel "safely"

If I ever have to buy spacers again for a rather heavy vehicle like a Tundra. I would consider heavier steel material just for peace of mind. Maybe an overkill. Since from the experience in this tread tend to show that the weakest link was the studs, not the spacers.
 

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Knurl diam Dorman 0.645 < Arp 0.660
Bolt 9/16 vs 5/8

And Arp 3" that's .5 inch longer than the already long Dorman. Probably too long for the stock wheels.

I like the Chrome moly of the Arp's but your suggestion is out of specs (too big, too long) - That's what she said!

I kind of recall looking up the ARP's and also kind of recall they didn't have anything for the new Tundras
Well, that's kinda the nice thing about being a little too long, you can always cut it down a bit depending on the wheels and spacer you are using, or go with longer lugs which Gorilla carries.
 

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Discussion Starter #33
Agreed although it's not obvious without messing the threads.
But what about the oversize diameter. That's my biggest concern with the ARP's they don't have 0.645 Knurls

Well, that's kinda the nice thing about being a little too long, you can always cut it down a bit depending on the wheels and spacer you are using, or go with longer lugs which Gorilla carries.
 

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Agreed although it's not obvious without messing the threads.
But what about the oversize diameter. That's my biggest concern with the ARP's they don't have 0.645 Knurls
.015 inch difference which equates to .38 mm, not enough to worry about when it comes to a press in.
 

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Discussion Starter #35 (Edited)
.015 inch difference which equates to .38 mm, not enough to worry about when it comes to a press in.
Good to know... I never dared trying... That's for the Knurl.

Now the bolt is also 0.0625 inch bigger in diameter. Will it fit in the spacer and wheel (including slightly oversize nut)?
 
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