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This is the first year I got some time to camp. Last few year family commitments had made be go to india and not having enough vacation for any extended plans.

I am excited to see how the tundra does. it has 115k and is new to towing. this year plan to visit Delaware seashore park, assatague [sp?] state park, hersey pa and a few state parks in PA. not a long trip. just a week in july leave the camper in storage somewhere and then pick it up in august and do another week before heading home to MA. Around 2k of towing.

i am changing the coolant today, i got airbags on craigslist which i cleaned and repainted yesterday. put some 4600 HD shocks in the rear.next up i found a DC stock exhaust , might swap the flowmaster 40 full exhaust headache maker . does anyone know if a DC exhaust will work on a crewmax?.how hard is it to swap, do i need to weld or it is just bolts?
 

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I believe the DC & CM share the same frame (DC/CM swap cab & bed space). As far as I know the exhaust systems between the two should bolt right up!
 

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Thanks , the dealership told me i have a full exhaust and it would take a full replace.but i question their expertise as most dealerships have become oil change stations. I am getting it for 50 so not a big investment if it does not work.
 

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If you know what year it came from Keith aka dirtydeeds can make an adapter for it if it doesn't fit.

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Hi everyone!

New to camping with a trailer, but not to tent camping.

So after many years of tent camping I've decided to invest on getting a travel trailer. So after researching several months on the subject I went to a local RV show in our area to see them in person.

Wow, theres a wealth of variety out there to see and buy and all very confusing indeed. So I would like to get recommendations and ownership experience based on the brands you had purchased from the current owners in here. This is what I've narrowed it down too but I'm open to suggestions and ideas.

Travel trailer needs;
Looking for length size 19-26ft
Pulling this with my Tundra
People using using for the majority are two people and two dogs

As for brands I looked and what Ive seen, I'm tending to lean to what are called couple coaches. Seem to have more room in them?
brands I looked at were:
Forest River: Surveyor 240RBS
Forest River: Surveyor 251RKS
Highland Ridge RV: Open Range Ultralite UT2604RB
Dutchman: Aerolite Zero Gravity 213RBSL
Forest River: Vibe 221RBSL

Keystone I looked at, but I met a couple of disgruntled owners at the show. So I got mixed feelings about them.
My goal is to find something thats reliable and trying to keep the price range under 25k
Thanks!
 

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Hi everyone!

New to camping with a trailer, but not to tent camping.

So after many years of tent camping I've decided to invest on getting a travel trailer. So after researching several months on the subject I went to a local RV show in our area to see them in person.

Wow, theres a wealth of variety out there to see and buy and all very confusing indeed. So I would like to get recommendations and ownership experience based on the brands you had purchased from the current owners in here. This is what I've narrowed it down too but I'm open to suggestions and ideas.

Travel trailer needs;
Looking for length size 19-26ft
Pulling this with my Tundra
People using using for the majority are two people and two dogs

As for brands I looked and what Ive seen, I'm tending to lean to what are called couple coaches. Seem to have more room in them?
brands I looked at were:
Forest River: Surveyor 240RBS
Forest River: Surveyor 251RKS
Highland Ridge RV: Open Range Ultralite UT2604RB
Dutchman: Aerolite Zero Gravity 213RBSL
Forest River: Vibe 221RBSL

Keystone I looked at, but I met a couple of disgruntled owners at the show. So I got mixed feelings about them.
My goal is to find something thats reliable and trying to keep the price range under 25k
Thanks!
Hello and welcome. I have many years of experience with RVs but do not intend to imply that I know all one needs to know. I have however learned enough to make an educated judgement about them. Of coarse, my experience may differ from others so, that is my disclaimer.
First, your Tundra will comfortably tow any of the models you noted. Do yourself a favor and do some research on weight distribution hitches. For some reason, I've never seen an RV dealer set one up correctly. Properly set up means your front suspension is ladened to as close to what it was before you hook up the trailer. Measer the front wheel well before and after and get it back to less that one inch difference.
OK, now for trailers. Don't let anyone tell you that Keystone is any different Forest River. They are parent companies of multiple manufactures. ALL of the manufactures, ALL, use very young kids for labor to build RVs. Their will be one guy per shop who knows what is supposed to happen and none of them have a quality control plan. They just set their prices to let RV dealers fix anything that did not go right during assembly. All of them use the same two or three manufacture of component parts. Refrigerators, Furnaces, AC units, etc. What matters is, what size are you getting for your money.
There are some manufacturing materials that will matter. Generally speaking, the more you spend, the more you get. Aluminum siding or vacuum bonded fiberglass. Aluminum roof, rubber roof, of vacuum bonded one piece roof. The more you spend, the more you get. But, do you really need it? Also, remember, the more nicer stuff, cabinets and such, the more it weighs. More better insulation weighs more. Nicer cabinets and porcelain toilet weighs more than lesser cabinets and plastic toilet.
On price, 30% off retail is a starting point for negotiation a deal. And be warned, dealers and manufacturers will make up retail prices that make no sense what so ever so, compare apples to apples.
In the end, find the one that your wife likes, that meets your needs and keep arguing price till they squeal and buy it. Buy the one you like best.
 

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Hello and welcome. I have many years of experience with RVs but do not intend to imply that I know all one needs to know. I have however learned enough to make an educated judgement about them. Of coarse, my experience may differ from others so, that is my disclaimer.
First, your Tundra will comfortably tow any of the models you noted. Do yourself a favor and do some research on weight distribution hitches. For some reason, I've never seen an RV dealer set one up correctly. Properly set up means your front suspension is ladened to as close to what it was before you hook up the trailer. Measer the front wheel well before and after and get it back to less that one inch difference.
OK, now for trailers. Don't let anyone tell you that Keystone is any different Forest River. They are parent companies of multiple manufactures. ALL of the manufactures, ALL, use very young kids for labor to build RVs. Their will be one guy per shop who knows what is supposed to happen and none of them have a quality control plan. They just set their prices to let RV dealers fix anything that did not go right during assembly. All of them use the same two or three manufacture of component parts. Refrigerators, Furnaces, AC units, etc. What matters is, what size are you getting for your money.
There are some manufacturing materials that will matter. Generally speaking, the more you spend, the more you get. Aluminum siding or vacuum bonded fiberglass. Aluminum roof, rubber roof, of vacuum bonded one piece roof. The more you spend, the more you get. But, do you really need it? Also, remember, the more nicer stuff, cabinets and such, the more it weighs. More better insulation weighs more. Nicer cabinets and porcelain toilet weighs more than lesser cabinets and plastic toilet.
On price, 30% off retail is a starting point for negotiation a deal. And be warned, dealers and manufacturers will make up retail prices that make no sense what so ever so, compare apples to apples.
In the end, find the one that your wife likes, that meets your needs and keep arguing price till they squeal and buy it. Buy the one you like best.
Hello GdHugh, and thank you kindly for the response:)
I will heed your advice and track down weight distribution hitches.
Are their any particular brands to look for or they are pretty much equal across the board?

Quality control issue, I suspected as much, in particular when seeing the same appliance's across the range and they seem to copy each other.
I see most of these have options for a larger AC/furnace unit. Is that something that should be considered, or are there other options that makes more sense.
I did see different types of roofs, do rubber roofs hold well? Or do I need to look at different roof type?
The vacuum bonded fiberglass seemed to be more rigid and stable. More quiet within these units versus the aluminum siding ones.

Are there pros and cons to any of these? or is it just customer preference at this point?

I will be considering options for solar panels, because I really want to use this more off the grid. I see that most of these I'm guessing need to be hooked with site utilities or having a generator. Off site Im using a generator I use the Honda i2000. I'm guessing one is enough or do I need the second one to run the AC unit?

As far as picking one I got lucky, I got rid of the expensive ex wife. Girl friends can come and go. The only one I need to really take care of is my dog, he gets to travel.
 

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Hello GdHugh, and thank you kindly for the response:)
I will heed your advice and track down weight distribution hitches.
Are their any particular brands to look for or they are pretty much equal across the board?

Quality control issue, I suspected as much, in particular when seeing the same appliance's across the range and they seem to copy each other.
I see most of these have options for a larger AC/furnace unit. Is that something that should be considered, or are there other options that makes more sense.
I did see different types of roofs, do rubber roofs hold well? Or do I need to look at different roof type?
The vacuum bonded fiberglass seemed to be more rigid and stable. More quiet within these units versus the aluminum siding ones.

Are there pros and cons to any of these? or is it just customer preference at this point?

I will be considering options for solar panels, because I really want to use this more off the grid. I see that most of these I'm guessing need to be hooked with site utilities or having a generator. Off site Im using a generator I use the Honda i2000. I'm guessing one is enough or do I need the second one to run the AC unit?

As far as picking one I got lucky, I got rid of the expensive ex wife. Girl friends can come and go. The only one I need to really take care of is my dog, he gets to travel.
Hey Marc, Don't bother with anything except an Equal-i-zer WDH they are the best on the market IMO. They have different sizes and weights depending on what size Travel Trailer you get.
 
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I hope to be helpful and not confusing as there are people who fnd different solutions to common issues. But for me...
I used an Equil-I-zer brand to start with just because I picked it up used at a great price. I was extremely happy with it's set up capability and how well it worked to resist sway. I only change to a Blue-Ox Sway pro because I needed more flexibility because my tongue weight can change dramatically with a toy hauler and it is very easy to adjust.
I suggest etrailers.com for lots of information and great prices.

Options for AC, furnace, frig, transformer, sizes vary. the less expensive units will typically have smaller appliances. You need to take notes because they all seem to run together after a while. I found one that seemed to have all the right stuff at the right price so I drove three hours to look at it and found everything was far and beyond what I had seen anywhere else at the same price point until I stated looking at cabinets and general construction was total crap. They were able to add some things by cutting corners elsewhere. You just have to find the right mix in a unit you really like.
As for roofs, most are going to be rubber which is fine. Fiberglass vacuum bonded is better but will only be found on a premium RV. The more you pay, the more you get but, only to a point an not always.
Vacuum bonded sidewalls are very common and used to suffer from blistering when moisture would get behind the laminate. They are much better today and many will offer specific extended warranty times just for the laminate to promote their improved processes. Aluminum walls are fine as is evident by the time they have been around. The only real problem is when they get a roof leak which goes down inside the wall for a long time and rots the wood. Otherwise, they tend to weight more than vacuum bonded.
You'll find some models come pre-wired for solar. Basic solar can charge your battery in good weather and really not much else. A solar charging system for long term dry camping is costly in terms of money and weight and can be very complex. Do your homework. Luckily, most newer RV use LED lighting so that helps alot. Do yourself a favor and buy 2 6volt golf cart batteries, either group 1 or group 2 and wire in series for enough 12volt for several days if your conservative.
Those Honda generators are wonderful. You will need two to run your AC for sure.
I remember being between wives and from that standpoint I will advise you to by exactly what you want. Don't settle for anything less than you absolutely have to.

Best of luck, David
 

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Quality control issue, I suspected as much, in particular when seeing the same appliance's across the range and they seem to copy each other.
I see most of these have options for a larger AC/furnace unit. Is that something that should be considered, or are there other options that makes more sense.
Depends on if you need it.. i.e. camping in the south during the Summer at a campground that has hookups, then you might want to consider a bigger AC unit.

I did see different types of roofs, do rubber roofs hold well? Or do I need to look at different roof type?
The vacuum bonded fiberglass seemed to be more rigid and stable. More quiet within these units versus the aluminum siding ones.

Are there pros and cons to any of these? or is it just customer preference at this point?
Everything has pros and cons. Aluminum siding is easier to replace a panel if it gets damaged than fiberglass, but "easier" is all relative. Aluminum siding never looks awesome in my opinion while fiberglass can look very nice, basically it's preference and cost. For the roofs, all of them are roughly the same stuff unless you fork over some serious coin.

I will be considering options for solar panels, because I really want to use this more off the grid. I see that most of these I'm guessing need to be hooked with site utilities or having a generator. Off site Im using a generator I use the Honda i2000. I'm guessing one is enough or do I need the second one to run the AC unit?
A Honda 2000 can run a 13K unit, but will have a hard time starting one. My Yamaha 2400iS can start my 13K unit, but not at first, I had to add a hard start capacitor (RV Air Conditioner Hard Start Capacitor | ModMyRV). For off the grid, the first thing to worry about is batteries. Look at picking up 2 or 4 6v golf cart batteries.

- Ken
 
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Nothing wrong with a rubber roof. Just be aware of proper cleaning and be careful going under low branches. I had a limb fall on one of mine and tore a hole but I was able to put a patch on it with little effort.
There are three different kinds of roofing material used on an RV. Rubber – Probably the most common material for an RV roof. Rubber roofs come in two different types. An EPDM RV roof (Ethylene Propylene Diene Monomer), or a TPO RV roof (Thermal Poly Olefin)

On generators, as stated above, your 2k Honda will run a 13.5 ac unit but, it's not wise, IMHO Look at the chart below and remember, your 2000 is peak surge while it is 1600 watt rated
This is from Honda generators web site
Motorhome 5th Wheel and Camp Trailer Roof Top Air Conditioners Watts Required for start up Average wattage once running
Starting Running
7000 btu rv air conditioner 1700 600
10,000 btu rv air conditioner 2000 700
13,500 btu rv air conditioner 2750 1250
15,000 btu rv air conditioner 3500 1500
 

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If you know what year it came from Keith aka dirtydeeds can make an adapter for it if it doesn't fit.

Sent from my SM-G900V using Tapatalk
Used truck, my wife brought it one day as she usually does with things that look nice. She said it lifted, sound nice and has big rims so i brought it...so not a lot of info. Its also a bit rusted and i have no idea if there are any markings and if so where.
 

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Wow guys this community has been so awesome! Please keep it coming, this is all valued information!

More questions, I’m sorry for asking, but maybe after all said and done the moderators could make a sticky out of it for newbies.

As luck would have it, one of my local suppliers got me the Honda companion generator. I guess that’s what happens when spend a good amount of dollars with them. So I think I’m good at least with starting the A/C. But I will get the RV Hard Start Capacitor as recommended by Ken. I ordered 6 of the 6volt golf cart batteries, whatever isn’t used for the RV can be used at my facility.

Interesting enough looking through different sites, such as Craigslist, Ebay, and RVtrader. I'm seeing that it really doesn't pay to buy anything used. I'm not seeing a whole lot of savings buying used over new. Especially in the mid to lower $20k range. Or is there something I'm missing and should be looking elsewhere?

Interesting question I have and I'm guessing I know the answer, but would like some clarification. I'm seeing some of these units indicating a four season use. So by four season, I'm guessing they are doing the following?
1) Enclosing the underbelly, insulating the waterlines and filling the underbelly with insulation? or
2) Are they using ducts when you turn on the furnace to heat the underbelly?
3) If these are Ultra-Lites, how truly are these units insulated?
4) Or are these the units that you all mentioned that I would need to drop serious coin to acquire?

I know when I build a home I'm using 2x6 exterior walls with insulation or sprayed foam. But I'm not seeing that here. Am I missing something or is this another ruse from these manufacturers? The reason I ask is because I'm an avid hunter and even more so into waterfowl in the past two years. If I could use this as a camp site that would be great.

Can you all explain to me about Grey, black and clear water tanks. I’m seeing a huge difference between sizes on these things. I know “clear” is drinking or showering, “Grey” is sink/shower water, and “Black” sewage. How much does one use in a week if it were for example a family of four? Using that as my worse case scenario. I looked at a Winniebago Minnie and it seemed the tanks were small. While others the tanks were larger.

I’m also seeing location for the dump station varies a lot on these things, I’m not a fan of crawling under these things to open and close valves are they all like that or are there brands that better access then others? Perhaps other accessories that should be purchased aftermarket to assist?

Slides, how often do they break down? Are they able to hand crank if no power is available? I’m guesssing it’s a pain to hand crank, but its better then nothing. I know slide toppers are a must, so I will be making sure those are included in my purchase.

I see all these units have scissor jacks, Is there something I should look for to keep the rocking motion a bit firmer. Some were very bouncy and other seemed solid. Are their auto leveling jacks? or is it something that can be applied as an aftermarket item?

I noticed when touring these units, that ventilation is not huge in the sense of vents not referring to windows. I see powered vent fans are options what your all opinions on these? Is this something that can be retrofitted into the existing vent openings? Or is this something that is cut into the roof and installed? Basically does the dealer do it and pay the markup or is this something I can do?

What have you all placed at your homes, was thinking of putting power and a dump station just in case?

Lastly, storage, my situation my driveway is large enough to allow 3-4 cars. I can park the trailer to the side and still access one of my garage doors, (will be blocking the other one). Other the winterizing, by draining all the lines and putting in rv antifreeze. Coat of wax, and taking care of the roof. Is there a reason to get a cover for it? Or does that do more harm then good? We do get snow up here…East coast.

Thanks!
 

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does anyone pull a 5th wheel toy hauler with there 5.7 tundra I will be hauling about 1300 pounds of Harleys in it plus gear
There are pictures of a few on this site of 5th wheels but I haven't seen 5th wheel toy haulers. I am sure that is going to take some serious calculating. Basically, 5th wheel pin weight will be over the weight capacity of the trucks GVWR. But, putting 1300 lbs of bikes in the back will reduce it and beefing up the suspension with air bags and Bilstien shocks will go a long way to making it doable. My2CT
 

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does anyone pull a 5th wheel toy hauler with there 5.7 tundra I will be hauling about 1300 pounds of Harleys in it plus gear
You can calculate your 5th wheel weights at this web site: FIFTH WHEEL ST I know it can be done with a little common sense & proper weight distribution. They have lots of good info.
 

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Interesting question I have and I'm guessing I know the answer, but would like some clarification. I'm seeing some of these units indicating a four season use. So by four season, I'm guessing they are doing the following?
1) Enclosing the underbelly, insulating the waterlines and filling the underbelly with insulation? or
2) Are they using ducts when you turn on the furnace to heat the underbelly?
3) If these are Ultra-Lites, how truly are these units insulated?
4) Or are these the units that you all mentioned that I would need to drop serious coin to acquire?
1) My KZ Sportsmen has an enclosed underbelly and is filled with fiberglass insulation.
2) The underbelly is usually heated passively unless you have heated tanks.
3) Most manufacturers I've seen use R7-R11

Can you all explain to me about Grey, black and clear water tanks. I’m seeing a huge difference between sizes on these things. I know “clear” is drinking or showering, “Grey” is sink/shower water, and “Black” sewage. How much does one use in a week if it were for example a family of four? Using that as my worse case scenario. I looked at a Winniebago Minnie and it seemed the tanks were small. While others the tanks were larger.
As a family of 3 we can fill up our 32gal grey tank in a weekend, black is the same size and almost impossible for us to fill up in a week. We don't use our fresh tank so I can't provide any input on that.

I’m also seeing location for the dump station varies a lot on these things, I’m not a fan of crawling under these things to open and close valves are they all like that or are there brands that better access then others? Perhaps other accessories that should be purchased aftermarket to assist?
All the travel trailers I've seem have the same setup on the side that requires you to hook up the hose and pull a valve, the location front to back can vary. I've never had to crawl under anything to empty the tanks.

Slides, how often do they break down? Are they able to hand crank if no power is available? I’m guesssing it’s a pain to hand crank, but its better then nothing. I know slide toppers are a must, so I will be making sure those are included in my purchase.
In many years of camping I've only seen one motor go on a 10 yr old camper, cost to replace it was $40. It still worked but really struggled. Most of them you can crank by hand using the same tool for the jacks. Slide toppers are a convenience item and are not a must in my book.

I see all these units have scissor jacks, Is there something I should look for to keep the rocking motion a bit firmer. Some were very bouncy and other seemed solid. Are their auto leveling jacks? or is it something that can be applied as an aftermarket item?
You will only find these in high end 5th wheels and motorhomes.

What have you all placed at your homes, was thinking of putting power and a dump station just in case?
30 amp outlet and if we need to dump any tanks we use a portable tank and dump it into our septic system.

Lastly, storage, my situation my driveway is large enough to allow 3-4 cars. I can park the trailer to the side and still access one of my garage doors, (will be blocking the other one). Other the winterizing, by draining all the lines and putting in rv antifreeze. Coat of wax, and taking care of the roof. Is there a reason to get a cover for it? Or does that do more harm then good? We do get snow up here…East coast.
Campers are fine without a cover, when we winterize ours we just drain the lines and we wax it once spring hits.
 

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Interesting enough looking through different sites, such as Craigslist, Ebay, and RVtrader. I'm seeing that it really doesn't pay to buy anything used. I'm not seeing a whole lot of savings buying used over new. Especially in the mid to lower $20k range. Or is there something I'm missing and should be looking elsewhere?
When shopping used, typically, people will take much less that their asking and dealers will ask for all they can get. You got to go look and deal. The advertised price is always way more, in my experience.

Interesting question I have and I'm guessing I know the answer, but would like some clarification. I'm seeing some of these units indicating a four season use. So by four season, I'm guessing they are doing the following?
1) Enclosing the underbelly, insulating the waterlines and filling the underbelly with insulation? or
2) Are they using ducts when you turn on the furnace to heat the underbelly?
3) If these are Ultra-Lites, how truly are these units insulated?
4) Or are these the units that you all mentioned that I would need to drop serious coin to acquire?

I know when I build a home I'm using 2x6 exterior walls with insulation or sprayed foam. But I'm not seeing that here. Am I missing something or is this another ruse from these manufacturers? The reason I ask is because I'm an avid hunter and even more so into waterfowl in the past two years. If I could use this as a camp site that would be great.
Many units have an enclosed underbelly today. Some has some insulation and some have none. The one who have none will tell you why you don't need it. Many dealers won't know. Look for the 4 seasons sticker for a good indication but some will have good insulation and not have the certification sticker. Many with enclosed underbelly will have a duct to blow in to that space. Keep in mind, this only works when running the furnace, so, you want a larger furnace AND, a larger furnace will use a lot of propane when it's really cold out. Most folk will use electric heat to supplement heating and save LP. Another reason for that second generator. Research in person as you can and make notes if you need to call the manufacturer. All of them have a manufacture sales rep who can answer any questions.
Ultra-Lites, cut weight anywhere that can. If it has great insulation, it may not have something else you want. You have enough truck to buy a well equipped unit sense your keeping it down to mid 20' range.

Can you all explain to me about Grey, black and clear water tanks. I’m seeing a huge difference between sizes on these things. I know “clear” is drinking or showering, “Grey” is sink/shower water, and “Black” sewage. How much does one use in a week if it were for example a family of four? Using that as my worse case scenario. I looked at a Winniebago Minnie and it seemed the tanks were small. While others the tanks were larger.

I’m also seeing location for the dump station varies a lot on these things, I’m not a fan of crawling under these things to open and close valves are they all like that or are there brands that better access then others? Perhaps other accessories that should be purchased aftermarket to assist?
Typical tanks are 40 gallon. Toy Haulers will have up to ~105 gallon. First time I camped with teen girls, they ran my fresh water out withing hours of setting up even after I explained about conserving water. I had to dump the grey tank on the ground when no one was around and made them carry fresh water to refill the tank. Lesson learned. Dry Camping, just do everything you can to minimize water usage and what goes in the grey tank. The black tank will last a week with a family of four. That might depend on if the kids are boys or girls. Even with girls, there are ways to be conservative. Use a dishpan for washing dishes and girls hair. Different water, of coarse. ;-)
I have found that most dump valve locations are well thought out but not all. If they are really in a bad location, you can always change them to electric and just flip a switch.

Slides, how often do they break down? Are they able to hand crank if no power is available? I’m guesssing it’s a pain to hand crank, but its better then nothing. I know slide toppers are a must, so I will be making sure those are included in my purchase.
I've owned four RVs with slides and never had one fail. I have heard that you can manually crank them out but, I've never seen it done. Personally, I would not have one without slides anymore and would worry about what to do if one failed later.

I see all these units have scissor jacks, Is there something I should look for to keep the rocking motion a bit firmer. Some were very bouncy and other seemed solid. Are their auto leveling jacks? or is it something that can be applied as an aftermarket item?
Roll the jacks down just snug, Wheel chocks are a must. The scissor type helps prevent rocking when the wind blows or someone walking around while others are asleep.
I noticed when touring these units, that ventilation is not huge in the sense of vents not referring to windows. I see powered vent fans are options what your all opinions on these? Is this something that can be retrofitted into the existing vent openings? Or is this something that is cut into the roof and installed? Basically does the dealer do it and pay the markup or is this something I can do?
A "Fantastic Fan" (brand) will mount inside the existing vent. Simple 10 minute job. Getting power to it is the problem. People who do it after market will run power through the AC ducting. Many units come with one or two from the factory. When the weather is nice or even warm, you can open widows and turn on the fan and often be very comfortable.
What have you all placed at your homes, was thinking of putting power and a dump station just in case?
I have a 50amp plug at my storage location and a 50amp plug at my house along with a dump station between the house and the septic tank. They both come in handy very often. Worth the effort, to me.
Lastly, storage, my situation my driveway is large enough to allow 3-4 cars. I can park the trailer to the side and still access one of my garage doors, (will be blocking the other one). Other the winterizing, by draining all the lines and putting in rv antifreeze. Coat of wax, and taking care of the roof. Is there a reason to get a cover for it? Or does that do more harm then good? We do get snow up here…East coast.

Thanks!
Mine have always been under a garage cover. I've heard positives and negatives on covers. Some say they don't breath so the collect moisture. I did have my 25' boat covered in canvas for many years during the off season and it was always dry. At a minimum, I would recommend a dehumidifier for inside. Mine drains to the grey tank. Be sure to leave the frig open when not in use.
 

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Ok folks, this helps a lot. Armed with this information, I think I'm more comfortable finding what I'm looking for.

Do we know of any RV dealers on the East coast I need to stay away from?
 

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Ok folks, this helps a lot. Armed with this information, I think I'm more comfortable finding what I'm looking for.

Do we know of any RV dealers on the East coast I need to stay away from?
There are a few in MA I'm not a fan of but I won't bash them here as they are not fully responsible for the issue(s). When buying new or used always make sure you inspect the trailer thoroughly for water damage, this includes slide outs, storage compartments, vent areas, etc.

I will say I had good luck with ALL RV in CT.
 
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