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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys, I went to install a new TRD sway bar and noticed a bunch of surface rust starting under my 14 Tundra. I know a lot of guys use fluid film to protect. Since the rust has already started (nothing too bad) I wanted some suggestions of what would work best. I'd like some kind of black spray to get it looking like new again.
 

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Interested in this also. I have light surface rust on my suspension components.
 

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Hey guys, I went to install a new TRD sway bar and noticed a bunch of surface rust starting under my 14 Tundra. I know a lot of guys use fluid film to protect. Since the rust has already started (nothing too bad) I wanted some suggestions of what would work best. I'd like some kind of black spray to get it looking like new again.
It sounds like you live in a climate where the roads are going to be wet and salty a lot.

What you're describing as a desired solution sounds a lot like undercoating, but if undercoating is to be done, it should be applied when the truck is in new condition, and not sprayed over rust that's already started. Wanting your chassis to look new is understandable, but NOTHING keeps the underside of a truck looking "new" very long...that's the unvarnished truth.

For your climate, and since rust has already started, fluid film is probably your best option in my opinion. The threads on it's use and application make it clear that it's sticky, drips, messy to apply, not cheap, and has be maintained with regular reapplication, BUT, it is effective. "What can you do?"...you don't live in a great place to keep a truck looking new.
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
It sounds like you live in a climate where the roads are going to be wet and salty a lot.

What you're describing as a desired solution sounds a lot like undercoating, but if undercoating is to be done, it should be applied when the truck is in new condition, and not sprayed over rust that's already started. Wanting your chassis to look new is understandable, but NOTHING keeps the underside of a truck looking "new" very long...that's the unvarnished truth.

For your climate, and since rust has already started, fluid film is probably your best option in my opinion. The threads on it's use and application make it clear that it's sticky, drips, messy to apply, not cheap, and has be maintained with regular reapplication, BUT, it is effective. "What can you do?"...you don't live in a great place to keep a truck looking new.
I live in NY where they salt the roads for a flake of snow. Even when I wash it, the roads are still salty, so it's pointless. I'm thinking areas around the hitch and stuff that are visible I'll sand down then spray. I see a lot of chemical rust treatments too. I want to treat what's there, then protect it. If I don't get any better suggestions I'm going to call a few body shops and see what they'd charge.
 

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I haven't tried it yet, but I've heard really good things about POR-15 for treating rust. I have a couple of spots on the tow hitch receiver and my running boards I plan to use this on.
 

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I haven't tried it yet, but I've heard really good things about POR-15 for treating rust. I have a couple of spots on the tow hitch receiver and my running boards I plan to use this on.
I've used POR-15, and that is a good idea.

POR-15 cures to an extremely hard, high gloss finish. It can be applied over existing rust after all the loose oxidation has been removed. Just keep in mind that the manufacturer warns POR-15 is not UV tolerant. If this becomes a problem, it will probably be more of an issue on your hitch and running boards, than under the truck where it wouldn't be exposed to direct UV.
 
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I have a por-15'd car, and it didn't hold up well to be honest.
I can blow it off with a blow gun. The car has not seen winter. Just sat outside for several years.


I use Fluid Film. It is actually pretty cheap. Initially it is not cheap per say, but if you get a gallon and the applicator with the tubes,it's about $100 or so. And you can spray it anywhere, nooks crannies, inside the frame rails etc... And do the truck about 4 times to one gallon. And when you do it seasonally you will actually use less than the first time. So one gallon might last 5-6 seasons.


With that said, there was a spray naval jelly that chemically treats the rust, dries to a blackish primer type surface. Haven't used it or seen it in years, but I am sure it is still out there. That might be good for the hitch area.
 
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I have a por-15'd car, and it didn't hold up well to be honest.
I can blow it off with a blow gun. The car has not seen winter. Just sat outside for several years.


I use Fluid Film. It is actually pretty cheap. Initially it is not cheap per say, but if you get a gallon and the applicator with the tubes,it's about $100 or so. And you can spray it anywhere, nooks crannies, inside the frame rails etc... And do the truck about 4 times to one gallon. And when you do it seasonally you will actually use less than the first time. So one gallon might last 5-6 seasons.


With that said, there was a spray naval jelly that chemically treats the rust, dries to a blackish primer type surface. Haven't used it or seen it in years, but I am sure it is still out there. That might be good for the hitch area.
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B000HBNX38/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_awdb_Md3RzbDMVHRM4

Stuff works great. Use it on our fleet trucks every year. They get covered in salt constantly.

Sorry first link was a dud.
 
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