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Discussion Starter #1
So, we recently got a travel trailer with a tongue weight of 820 pounds. gvwr is 9600 but the weight typically stays around 7600-8000 as i don't really carry any liquids in the tanks. I've noticed a 4 inch sag in the rear even with a weight distribution/anti sway hitch. I'm around 75k miles on stock tss suspension on a 2014 double cab and haven't noticed any leaking in the shocks but was curious about upgrading to bilstein 4600 or 5100 series shocks to try to solve the issue before going to air bags. Kicker is I don't need the lift or level of the 5100's as I already have a 2.5 front and 1 inch rear lift level but they are block not suspension lift and I have a Transfer flow 46 gallon tank that, when full, causes some lean to the left. Would I be better off just going 4600 for the stiffer shock and same ride height or should I go for the 5100 and basically corner balance for the additional weight of the fuel since from factory i only had the 26 gallon tank?
 

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Free Tire Finalist
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Rear shocks do nothing to the ride height or spring rate, they simply control the motion. No shock will raise the rear of your truck, you would need add-a-leafs, air bags, etc. However, I think you may need to adjust your WDH. My trailer maxes at 7500 and usually do travel with water and a few hundred pounds (generator, firewood, etc) in the bed. I get some sag, but nowhere near 4". Now, before I adjusted the hitch I did get near that much sag.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Rear shocks do nothing to the ride height or spring rate, they simply control the motion. No shock will raise the rear of your truck, you would need add-a-leafs, air bags, etc. However, I think you may need to adjust your WDH. My trailer maxes at 7500 and usually do travel with water and a few hundred pounds (generator, firewood, etc) in the bed. I get some sag, but nowhere near 4". Now, before I adjusted the hitch I did get near that much sag.
We took our first trip out with the trailer this last weekend and i had a load of firewood and a cooler in the bed of the truck (I wouldn't think much more than 300 or so pounds) and measured from the bottom of my hitch (lowest point of measure) a 4 inch drop from stock load to trailer load. My WDH was set up from the dealer so that may very well be a culprit as their integrity so far has been iffy. They left my electric water heater element on from pickup and it burnt up before I ever got the trailer home and they didn't put a pin in my jack foot and that went flying away on the first trip. I'm not worried about buying new shocks since I'm close to being ready for them any ways but adjusting the WDH would be my next best bet I suppose and after that looking in to air bags. I tow light loads of around 2500 to 5000 lbs between a 14' and a 20 ft' trailer and have never had any issue without a WDH. With my TT I measured without a load 10" from the bottom of the hitch and with the trailer only 6".
 

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Dealers usually do screw shit up. You may need shocks due to age/mileage, but like I said they won't do anything to help sag, they only control the actions of the springs no matter how stiff they are it will still sag the same. Another thing is that with a 2.5/1 lift you have already lost 1.5" of rake that a stock truck has making the sag visually more noticeable. Also, while the stats on the trailer may say 820lbs tongue weight, they are notoriously wrong on the light side and that's a pretty good load for a 1/2 ton truck.
 

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However, I think you may need to adjust your WDH.
What AZblue said. Most WDH manufacturers have great tutorials on their websites. With the correct WDH rating and adjustment, your truck should be close to unhitched height front and rear.

Regarding shocks, I prefer a heavy duty monotube design, such as 5100 series. They run cooler, less chance of cavitation. These shocks made a huge improvement for me when towing, especially with dips in the road.
 

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Hi. I have a 17 crewcab. My camper is also around 8000 lbs. But has a tongue weight of 950 lbs, which doesn't allow for much cargo in the bed. I installed Firestone airbags that i fill to 50 psi amd installed E rated tires at 75 psi. Rig is perfectly level. I have a Reese wdh with 1000 lb. bars. I think the airbags will help more than the shocks. I site wish toyboata had a super duty.
 

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I have 2019 Tundra Pro with air bags to tow my travel trailer. Air bags level the ride and tows better.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Well I checked the WDH today and it was off. Had to add some washers to push more weight to the front and to the trailer axles. Dealer screwed that one up. I'll check it put towing it this Thanksgiving and see how I feel about putting an airbag kit on. Think I'll definitely do the 4600's soon to replace my OEM shocks.
 

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I have 2019 Tundra Pro with air bags to tow my travel trailer. Air bags level the ride and tows better.
Hey Bmax how do you like the Pro shocks towing and not towing. I am thinking about them for my 2018. I tow a small trailer also.
 

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Hey Bmax how do you like the Pro shocks towing and not towing. I am thinking about them for my 2018. I tow a small trailer also.
The Fox shocks are much softer than the regular shocks so having the air bags is a must. I also added a sway bar which helped with the sway. I used to have a 2010 tundra and the Pro shocks are night and day difference for both ride and tow.
 

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I tow a 5th wheel with a 2018 DC TRD with E rated BFG KO2s, a rear sway bar, and air bags with separate air lines to prevent the air in the bags from transferring side to side. Tows great.
 

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Tundras are notorious for sagging with a load on the rear.

As mentioned above, shocks do not affect ride height at all, unless you use something like an adjustable air shock. Otherwise, you should consider ditching the blocks, get a full leaf pack for your unloaded height, and then add air bags to prevent it from sagging.

There are alot of options for aftermarket rear leaf springs now, otherwise, you can work with a local suspension shop and they might be able to build you a leaf pack for your needs.
 
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