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Anybody else towing similar sized TT or TH's over the passes in relative comfort. I am pretty confident that my 2015 5.7 is up to the task but coming from a diesel I will be curious how she does.
Do yourself a favor. Get the Torque App, install it on a 7" or 10.1" Android tablet computer or a large screen Android smartphone and use it on your trip. There are a number of threads here on TT that discuss configuring it to monitor your Tundra's various systems. I use this app whenever I tow to monitor the coolant temp, Tranny Temp, Tranny Pan Temp and other things. The Tundra is a great truck and the Torque App is a great tool to have when towing.
 
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Have you ever caught anything while using this App that you had to make an adjustment for? Ie. high tranny temps?

The instrument panel has a tranny temp gauge, but I'm pretty sure the needle will only move past 'normal' if things get bad because I've never seen mine move up at all while towing.

I could see monitoring things super close if you're towing crazy heavy. With a stock Tundra towing a reasonable load (6-8,000lbs), I'd think you're pretty safe to just assume Toyota built the truck to do the job without breaking a sweat?
I guess it depends on one's definition of a normal tranny temp or what tranny temp one considers too high. It would be interesting to know what Toyota considers normal and high for a Tundra transmission. As now now, I have not seen that Toyota has published that information.

My '12 has the tranny temp gauge in the dash cluster. When I tow, my car hauler weighs 5,500 to 6,000 pounds. When climbing 5-10 mile long grades that are 5-9 degrees from 1,000 to almost 4,000 feet I have seen the tranny temp go from 190 to 200 range to 215-220+ range. During those same climbs the tranny pan temp goes from the 190 to 200 range to the high 230s to mid to upper 240s range. FYI, the tranny temp gauge on my dash does not appear to move much at all regardless if the temp is 190 or pushing 250.

FYI, when I am towing I am usually in the 55-65 mph range. Slower climbing a grade and faster coming down the mountain. When my tranny temps stay in the high ranges for more than a few minutes I will usually drop from "D" to S4 or even S3. That keeps the tranny from trying to use overdrive and does increase RPMs. The benefit of doing this is that drops the both tranny temps back down to the lower ranges.

For some here that might be too much work to do keep an eye on the temps and drop out of "D" on occasion. For me, that is part of towing and taking care of my Tundra. I want to maximize it's service life since I want to get another 5+ years out of this truck. Maybe by then Toyota will have a truly NEW Generation Tundra that will have new engine & drivetrain options and increased cargo and towing capacity. Hey a guy can dream can't he?
 
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