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I am planning on getting an enclosed trailer for some of my toys (4 seat Can Am Maverick and dirt bikes). I have towed my 23 ft boat with no problems, but when it comes to trailers I know absolutely nothing about them. So I apologize in advance if this is a nooby question.

Here is an example of what I am looking to buy:

https://www.facebook.com/marketplace/item/2295685973993363/

Can my 2014 CrewMax 5.7L handle something like this? Do I need anything special, or just a regular ball hitch attachment? My biggest concern is the road between Phoenix and Flagstaff is very hilly with alot of 6% grades.

Thanks!

EDIT: I added pictures in case you don't want to go to the FB link. It's basically 8.5x24 Enclosed Trailer
 

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Free Tire Finalist
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That flat front is going to be a big wind block, but I'd be concerned about the weight. I didn't see a dry weight in the links you posted, but add that to the weight of your cargo to see if you can use your Tundra. I don't like to go much more than 75% of a trucks rated capacity for a relaxing tow. Give or take a few pounds, figure about 10k max on a Tundra. For example, my travel trailer is around 4900 dry and 7500 fully loaded with water,camping shit, etc. Tows great and could probably pull more, but not as nice and effortlessly as it does now.

You are also going to need a weight distribution hitch regardless of what trailer you get.
 

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That flat front is going to be a big wind block, but I'd be concerned about the weight. I didn't see a dry weight in the links you posted, but add that to the weight of your cargo to see if you can use your Tundra. I don't like to go much more than 75% of a trucks rated capacity for a relaxing tow. Give or take a few pounds, figure about 10k max on a Tundra. For example, my travel trailer is around 4900 dry and 7500 fully loaded with water,camping shit, etc. Tows great and could probably pull more, but not as nice and effortlessly as it does now.

You are also going to need a weight distribution hitch regardless of what trailer you get.
Yea, thats part of the problem. I have no idea how much trailers like these weight!

Do you have a link to the product you are talking about that would work for a setup like this? (weight distribution hitch)
 

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Figure at least 4000 pounds empty plus the weight of your toys (probably under 3K pounds) so maybe 7K pound range. Like @Azblue stated, you will need a WDH hitch (and sway controller, either as part of WDH hitch or separate) either way and since you have a 2014, also a trailer brake controller. Also, as previously alluded to, weight won't likely be as much of a concern as drag at highway speeds. Some of the hills to Flagstaff are pretty significant but as long as you are willing to pay the fuel bill it sounds doable if my weight estimates are correct. If you tow that route in the dead of summer you should keep an eye on transmission temps.
 

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Also, unless you have like 10 dirt bikes, why do you need a 24ft trailer? The Can-Am should only be like 12ft long, then a couple dirt bikes put in sideways in front or behind seems like an 18 footer would be plenty.
 

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I have towed an 18 ft flat nose, mpg sucked, but it was just to transport a tool box.

I would suggest a V nose to anyone looking to purchase an enclosed.

The manufacturer should list curb weight in the specs somewhere.

And yes, you should definitely run a weight distribution hitch.

Other than what has been covered, I see no issue. I do think for what you have listed as far as use, it might be on the larger side, but at least you have extra room. However, if you will not utilize that room, then you are spending more for a larger size both in up front price, and fuel down the road.

I want an 16-18x7ft V nose, but I want to add a window, some cabinets and basically make a toy hauler.
 
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I own a 24' enclosed trailer, used it to move from CA to OK
It weighs roughly 3400lbs dry. i overloaded it twice and pulled it with my 2007 CM. it pulled it just fine. I didn't force my truck so when there was an incline, i'd just let my speed drop down to what the truck felt comfortable pulling. sometimes that was 30mph, i could have pushed it harder and gone up to 55 or even higher. also i'm running 35" tires and had a lot of weight in my truck as well.

you'll need to use a WDH and also invest in some Firestone Airbags, i also purchased the daystar cradles for the airbags.

the trailer is big but the tundra has no problem pulling it. it consumes the exact same amount of gas pulling it empty or with 10,000lbs of weight in it. you're looking at 8mpgs... well at least thats what i got, like i said mine has 35" tires so that makes a difference.

if you havent bought one yet, mine is for sale. :)
 

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A few things for the original poster to consider.

I agree with others here that a 24' trailer is probably overkill (size & weight wise) for your needs. Personally I would go with a 8.5x20 foot trailer. Yes, you could fit your toys in a smaller trailer but anything under 20 feet long will reduce the trailer's appeal to someone looking to buy a car hauler if you go to sell it. Also, if you buy a new trailer be advised that there are a LOT of CHEAP, CRAPPY trailers out there. Those trailers are NOT built well which is why they cost less. When shopping for a trailer (new or used) spend some extra $$$ and get one with a Torsion Suspension with Dexter Axles. This setup provides a better ride than the cheaper Spring suspensions found on base model or cheap trailers.

I have a 8.5x20' enclosed car hauler. The specs for it say empty it weighs 3,175 lbs. Fully loaded it tips the CAT scales at 5500 to 6K lbs.

The next thing sounds kinds strange but if I were you I would steer clear of a dark colored trailer given where you live. A dark color trailer will add more heat to the inside temperature in the trailer. Silver or white trailers are cooler inside, just sayin'. Regardless of what color trailer you buy, paint the roof of the trailer with Elastomeric Paint. This paint does a few things. First it seals the roof of the trailer and prevents leaks. Second, it drops the inside temperature 20-30 degrees. FYI, this paint flexes so it does not crack when the trailer roof shifts and flexes during towing trips. I have had this paint on my trailer roof for going on 14 years now. Late last summer I power washed & scrubbed the roof and repainted it with fresh paint. BTW, the 20-30 degree temperature difference is the actual difference I personally measured myself.

I agree 110% with others here that a weight distributing hitch with sway control is an absolute MUST for you.
I use the Reese Straight Line WD Hitch with Dual cam sway control. https://www.etrailer.com/Weight-Distribution/Reese/RP66074.html
I have been in a number of towing situations over the years where I encountered 30-40 mph cross-winds and my setup kept me safe and under control.

With the kind of towing you will be doing do not be surprised if you see MPGs in the 7-9 ish MPG range.
I usually see 9-9.5 MPG when towing except when I climb long 7-12% grades then it is less.

Do a search on this forum for posts about the "Torque App". I use this app to monitor coolant, transmission and transmission pan temps (among other things) when towing. I run the app on my 10.1 android tablet which makes it easier to use.

When it comes to spare tires you really should carry at least two spares mounted on wheels. Also get yoursef a Trailer Aid. https://www.amazon.com/Trailer-Aid-Tandem-Changing-Trailers-24/dp/B001V8UKBY/ref=sr_1_1_sspa?crid=3MRRR6TBINE97&keywords=trailer+aid+plus&qid=1553694290&s=gateway&sprefix=trailer+aid%2Caps%2C177&sr=8-1-spons&psc=1

These things make changing a flat trailer tire EASY and FAST.
 

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A few things for the original poster to consider.

I agree with others here that a 24' trailer is probably overkill (size & weight wise) for your needs. Personally I would go with a 8.5x20 foot trailer. Yes, you could fit your toys in a smaller trailer but anything under 20 feet long will reduce the trailer's appeal to someone looking to buy a car hauler if you go to sell it. Also, if you buy a new trailer be advised that there are a LOT of CHEAP, CRAPPY trailers out there. Those trailers are NOT built well which is why they cost less. When shopping for a trailer (new or used) spend some extra $$$ and get one with a Torsion Suspension with Dexter Axles. This setup provides a better ride than the cheaper Spring suspensions found on base model or cheap trailers.

I have a 8.5x20' enclosed car hauler. The specs for it say empty it weighs 3,175 lbs. Fully loaded it tips the CAT scales at 5500 to 6K lbs.

The next thing sounds kinds strange but if I were you I would steer clear of a dark colored trailer given where you live. A dark color trailer will add more heat to the inside temperature in the trailer. Silver or white trailers are cooler inside, just sayin'. Regardless of what color trailer you buy, paint the roof of the trailer with Elastomeric Paint. This paint does a few things. First it seals the roof of the trailer and prevents leaks. Second, it drops the inside temperature 20-30 degrees. FYI, this paint flexes so it does not crack when the trailer roof shifts and flexes during towing trips. I have had this paint on my trailer roof for going on 14 years now. Late last summer I power washed & scrubbed the roof and repainted it with fresh paint. BTW, the 20-30 degree temperature difference is the actual difference I personally measured myself.

I agree 110% with others here that a weight distributing hitch with sway control is an absolute MUST for you.
I use the Reese Straight Line WD Hitch with Dual cam sway control. https://www.etrailer.com/Weight-Distribution/Reese/RP66074.html
I have been in a number of towing situations over the years where I encountered 30-40 mph cross-winds and my setup kept me safe and under control.

With the kind of towing you will be doing do not be surprised if you see MPGs in the 7-9 ish MPG range.
I usually see 9-9.5 MPG when towing except when I climb long 7-12% grades then it is less.

Do a search on this forum for posts about the "Torque App". I use this app to monitor coolant, transmission and transmission pan temps (among other things) when towing. I run the app on my 10.1 android tablet which makes it easier to use.

When it comes to spare tires you really should carry at least two spares mounted on wheels. Also get yoursef a Trailer Aid. https://www.amazon.com/Trailer-Aid-Tandem-Changing-Trailers-24/dp/B001V8UKBY/ref=sr_1_1_sspa?crid=3MRRR6TBINE97&keywords=trailer+aid+plus&qid=1553694290&s=gateway&sprefix=trailer+aid%2Caps%2C177&sr=8-1-spons&psc=1

These things make changing a flat trailer tire EASY and FAST.

Im not even looking for a trailer and i found this post awesome and helpful. Thank you
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Figure at least 4000 pounds empty plus the weight of your toys (probably under 3K pounds) so maybe 7K pound range. Like @Azblue stated, you will need a WDH hitch (and sway controller, either as part of WDH hitch or separate) either way and since you have a 2014, also a trailer brake controller. Also, as previously alluded to, weight won't likely be as much of a concern as drag at highway speeds. Some of the hills to Flagstaff are pretty significant but as long as you are willing to pay the fuel bill it sounds doable if my weight estimates are correct. If you tow that route in the dead of summer you should keep an eye on transmission temps.
I think mine already has the brake controller, unless you are talking about something different. I plug my boat trailer into a socket below my bed and it controls the brakes. Is this what you are referring to?

Also, unless you have like 10 dirt bikes, why do you need a 24ft trailer? The Can-Am should only be like 12ft long, then a couple dirt bikes put in sideways in front or behind seems like an 18 footer would be plenty.
Honestly? When I did a quick search, the only 8.5ft ones I saw for sale were 24ft and they were not THAT much more expensive than the smaller ones that would barely fit anything. They also seemed much nicer and with things like a side door.

However I think you guys are right. I should probably cut it down to something like a 20ft.

A few things for the original poster to consider.

I agree with others here that a 24' trailer is probably overkill (size & weight wise) for your needs. Personally I would go with a 8.5x20 foot trailer. Yes, you could fit your toys in a smaller trailer but anything under 20 feet long will reduce the trailer's appeal to someone looking to buy a car hauler if you go to sell it. Also, if you buy a new trailer be advised that there are a LOT of CHEAP, CRAPPY trailers out there. Those trailers are NOT built well which is why they cost less. When shopping for a trailer (new or used) spend some extra $$$ and get one with a Torsion Suspension with Dexter Axles. This setup provides a better ride than the cheaper Spring suspensions found on base model or cheap trailers.

I have a 8.5x20' enclosed car hauler. The specs for it say empty it weighs 3,175 lbs. Fully loaded it tips the CAT scales at 5500 to 6K lbs.

The next thing sounds kinds strange but if I were you I would steer clear of a dark colored trailer given where you live. A dark color trailer will add more heat to the inside temperature in the trailer. Silver or white trailers are cooler inside, just sayin'. Regardless of what color trailer you buy, paint the roof of the trailer with Elastomeric Paint. This paint does a few things. First it seals the roof of the trailer and prevents leaks. Second, it drops the inside temperature 20-30 degrees. FYI, this paint flexes so it does not crack when the trailer roof shifts and flexes during towing trips. I have had this paint on my trailer roof for going on 14 years now. Late last summer I power washed & scrubbed the roof and repainted it with fresh paint. BTW, the 20-30 degree temperature difference is the actual difference I personally measured myself.

I agree 110% with others here that a weight distributing hitch with sway control is an absolute MUST for you.
I use the Reese Straight Line WD Hitch with Dual cam sway control. https://www.etrailer.com/Weight-Distribution/Reese/RP66074.html
I have been in a number of towing situations over the years where I encountered 30-40 mph cross-winds and my setup kept me safe and under control.

With the kind of towing you will be doing do not be surprised if you see MPGs in the 7-9 ish MPG range.
I usually see 9-9.5 MPG when towing except when I climb long 7-12% grades then it is less.

Do a search on this forum for posts about the "Torque App". I use this app to monitor coolant, transmission and transmission pan temps (among other things) when towing. I run the app on my 10.1 android tablet which makes it easier to use.

When it comes to spare tires you really should carry at least two spares mounted on wheels. Also get yoursef a Trailer Aid. https://www.amazon.com/Trailer-Aid-Tandem-Changing-Trailers-24/dp/B001V8UKBY/ref=sr_1_1_sspa?crid=3MRRR6TBINE97&keywords=trailer+aid+plus&qid=1553694290&s=gateway&sprefix=trailer+aid%2Caps%2C177&sr=8-1-spons&psc=1

These things make changing a flat trailer tire EASY and FAST.
Awesome post! Thats very informative. I'm not TOO worried about MPG. I am currently getting like 12MPG as it is because of my bigger tires. But yea, I think you and the others were right about me doing a 20ft instead.

I am going to check out all the extras you recommended.

You just are all GREAT! I appreciate all the feedback, I was clueless about trailers!
 

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I think mine already has the brake controller, unless you are talking about something different. I plug my boat trailer into a socket below my bed and it controls the brakes. Is this what you are referring to?


2014s are prewired for a brake controller but do not come with one, you have to add it. I believe 2016 was the first year with a standard controller.
 

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I think mine already has the brake controller, unless you are talking about something different. I plug my boat trailer into a socket below my bed and it controls the brakes. Is this what you are referring to?
2014s are prewired for a brake controller but do not come with one, you have to add it. I believe 2016 was the first year with a standard controller.
Yes, what Azblue said. What you are pointing out is the connection to the truck. Just plugging that in will give your trailer lights but it will not have brakes unless you have a brake controller in the cab of the truck. Toyota did not integrate a brake controller until 2016 so if you don't have one then you were previously towing your boat with no trailer brakes.
 

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What is in your favor is a cargo trailer is not that tall compared to towing an RV. A "V" nose would help somewhat.

I have towed a RV trailers for 15 years. My 2014 DC Tundra has towed a 25' ( 10' tall / 5500 lbs.) RV where I got 11.25 mpg. The new RV is 29' ( 11.5" tall and 8000 lbs.) mpg is now 9.5. BUT, wind comes more into question with the new unit. At 25-30 mph winds, especially side winds I pull off the road.

Yes, a Weight Distribution hitch will be needed. Also watch what tires come with the new box trailer. Cheap ones with soft side walls can make handling a little too soft. My 2013 RV trailer I swapped out tires to Maxxis 8008's. Much better handling...The new RV trailer came with the best you can get. (The MorRyde 3000 suspension with 16" Goodyear Endurance tires and Monroe shocks and all wet bolts)

( 2013 Aerolite RV / 2018 Timber Ridge RV / MorRyde suspension
 

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So i just spent 8 hours on the road with my 24' enclosed trailer.
heading south towards Texas i had a head wind the whole way so my MPGs were atrocious. i had to stop for gas 3 times.
but that same wind pushed me from the rear on my return Northward. only stopped for gas twice and still have about 1/3 left when i got home. also going north i was cruising at 80+

it is a big trailer, but its not outside the parameters of what the tundra can pull.
 
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