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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Greetings,
I just set the App to read Transmission temperature (protocol 3). Which equation reads degrees F? It looks like Celcius by default. (I can convert but would rather get a direct reading).
Thanks,
ebcjr
 

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I never could get mine to read transmission temp. There are several things for Torque Pro on my wish list:

1. Gear indicator
2. Transmission temp
3. Trending longer than 10 seconds.
 
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You would need to create a custom PID for the trans temp, I had it working on my Tacoma but I was never able to get the correct formula for the PID for the Tundra.
 

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Greetings,
I just set the App to read Transmission temperature (protocol 3). Which equation reads degrees F? It looks like Celcius by default. (I can convert but would rather get a direct reading).
Thanks,
ebcjr
The following are the custom PIDs I set up in my Torque App.

PIDs I set up using the Taco Formulas:

For sensor 1 (Pan Temp):
OBD2 Mode and PID: 2182
Long Name: Transmission Fluid Temperature 1
Short Name: Trans 1
Minimum Value: 0.0
Maximum value: 300.0
Scale factor: x1
Unit Type: °F
Equation: ((((A*256)+B) * (7/100) – 400)/10)
OBD Header to use: left blank

For sensor 2 (Converter outlet temp):
OBD2 Mode and PID: 2182
Long Name: Transmission Fluid Temperature 2
Short Name: Trans 2
Minimum Value: 0.0
Maximum value: 300.0
Scale factor: x1
Unit Type: °F
Equation: ((((C*256)+D) * (7/100) – 400)/10)
OBD Header to use: left blank

I have been using this app and the settings I posted above for quite some time now especially when I am towing. The temps appear to be a fairly accurate indication based on coolant temp, ambient temp, etc. To be honest I am not sure they are 100% accurate since I have not found a way to verify that kind of accuracy.

Last summer I did a 1,700+ mile towing trip pulling my 5,500 lb enclosed car trailer in 95+ degree temps up and down some pretty tall "hills". It was interesting to watch the Converter Outlet Temp readings. These readings would rise when the tranny was under load (climbing a mountain in a lower gear). Once the tranny shifted into overdrive or the Converter Outlet Temp reached a certain high temp, the temp would drop 20-30 degrees. That lead me to believe that the transmission's cooler has a thermo switch which kicks in to cool the tranny when needed. BTW, the drop in the tranny temps brought them down to within 5-10 degrees of the coolant temp.

Like I said before I am not sure that these PIDs are 100% accurate when displaying the tranny temps. If someone has an accurate way to measure the tranny temps then these PIDs can be fine tuned if need be. Until then I will continue to use them knowing they may noy be 100% accurate. Regardless, they are MUCH BETTER indication of tranny temp trends than the tranny temp gauge in the dash.
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
equation

The setup that worked for me was:
OBD2 Mode/PID: 0105
Equation:
((A*1.8)-38)
I tried other PID settings and other equations and either got no output or temperature data that was obviously incorrect. (Too low). The equation was derived from ScanGageII X gage setup charts but would not work with their recommended PID. The PID was the default value in the Torque App for protocol 3. The output temperature squares well with IR thermometer readings on the pan after a ten mile drive and compare well with the coolant temps. They also rise with acceleration and uphill runs.
bc
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
One further observation: My system (phone, app, truck, and ELM327 device), take a long time to "sync up" when first starting. It may be due to the vehicle being cold and the data not stable. I wanted to monitor the transmission oil prior to reaching operating temperature in hopes of taking a level reading. Any ideas?
Thanks,
bc
 

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using Charlier's equations, i had 85.6 deg C showing on torque, and using an infra red thermometer I was getting 79.7 deg C at the upper part of the pan, I so I think it is a reasonably accurate reading.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Correct. My earlier PID/equation turned out to report coolant temp plus 2 degrees.
Since my truck is an 08, it should have used PID 21D9 and the associated equation. I had to replace A and B respectively with E and F. Now I am getting data that makes sense.
bc
 

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It's pretty much the same truck under the new sheet metal. I don't see why not.
 

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Not to resurrect an old thread, but compared the torque readings to techstream and they were within 1 degree of each other, so I would say the calculations are spot on
 

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forget getting this to work. I was at it for hours using the tacoma method too. All that ended up happening was it was using another sensor besides the trans and Used that and changed the values 10-XXX being exactly in a 10 digit fashion.
 

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I got my transmission temps working with Torque and the BAFX OBDII reader. Check for a thread by Charlier and type in what he has in his description. Just found Charlier's program.

For sensor 1 (Pan Temp):
OBD2 Mode and PID: 2182
Long Name: Transmission Fluid Temperature 1
Short Name: Trans 1
Minimum Value: 0.0
Maximum value: 300.0
Scale factor: x1
Unit Type: °F
Equation: ((((A*256)+B) * (7/100) – 400)/10)
OBD Header to use: left blank

For sensor 2 (Converter outlet temp):
OBD2 Mode and PID: 2182
Long Name: Transmission Fluid Temperature 2
Short Name: Trans 2
Minimum Value: 0.0
Maximum value: 300.0
Scale factor: x1
Unit Type: °F
Equation: ((((C*256)+D) * (7/100) – 400)/10)
OBD Header to use: left blank
 
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I got my transmission temps working with Torque and the BAFX OBDII reader. Check for a thread by Charlier and type in what he has in his description. Just found Charlier's program.

For sensor 1 (Pan Temp):
OBD2 Mode and PID: 2182
Long Name: Transmission Fluid Temperature 1
Short Name: Trans 1
Minimum Value: 0.0
Maximum value: 300.0
Scale factor: x1
Unit Type: °F
Equation: ((((A*256)+B) * (7/100) – 400)/10)
OBD Header to use: left blank

For sensor 2 (Converter outlet temp):
OBD2 Mode and PID: 2182
Long Name: Transmission Fluid Temperature 2
Short Name: Trans 2
Minimum Value: 0.0
Maximum value: 300.0
Scale factor: x1
Unit Type: °F
Equation: ((((C*256)+D) * (7/100) – 400)/10)
OBD Header to use: left blank

I'll try it. It would be nice to see the temp. Not that I tow but it would just be cool to see
 

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The setup that worked for me was:
OBD2 Mode/PID: 0105
Equation:
((A*1.8)-38)
I tried other PID settings and other equations and either got no output or temperature data that was obviously incorrect. (Too low). The equation was derived from ScanGageII X gage setup charts but would not work with their recommended PID. The PID was the default value in the Torque App for protocol 3. The output temperature squares well with IR thermometer readings on the pan after a ten mile drive and compare well with the coolant temps. They also rise with acceleration and uphill runs.
bc
This one worked on my 2008.

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