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When I took mine to the local Toyota dealership the tech told me it was a sealed transmission and a flush is the only thing you can do.
 

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When I took mine to the local Toyota dealership the tech told me it was a sealed transmission and a flush is the only thing you can do.
Ask them what their "Flush" is - if they are going by their booklet- it's to drop the pan and change the fluids (or "fluid exchange). Not to do a complete power flush. You'd probably have a hard time getting them to do a true power flush. Ask how many quarts are needed- if the answer is "4" - then it's not a complete flush.
 

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The tech said they hook up a machine to the cooler lines. Suck the old fluid out and pump in new fluid.
 

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The tech said they hook up a machine to the cooler lines. Suck the old fluid out and pump in new fluid.
I stand corrected, and a bit surprised. I'd just say do a bunch of searching on here - most recommend NOT doing a power flush with higher mileage trucks for a variety of reasons. Nobody is paying your bills though or taking care of your truck- so your call.

EDIT: a power flush has nothing to do with a sealed transmission- you can absolutely drop the pan and exchange about 4 quarts of the fluid. I did that not too long ago, and 1000's of others have as well.
 

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Unfortunately I didn't read anything about that until after I had it done. Luckily it didn't cause any issues. It may have been done before but the truck started life in Canada so I have no maintenance records.
 

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Discussion Starter #26
The tech said they hook up a machine to the cooler lines. Suck the old fluid out and pump in new fluid.
I just got back from having mine done and this is exactly what they did. I watched the tech through the glass. He fiddled around under the truck for a minute. He was in the area of the cooler and I assume what he was doing was using a pin to hold open the thermostat for the cooler. Then he walked to the back and got a case of WS fluid. He poured the entire case of fluid into the machine; about 12 quarts if I counted correctly. Then he hooked up two hoses to the truck. I couldn't tell where from the distance I was at. He then lowered the truck, started it up, and enjoyed his coffee while the machine did its thing. When it was done he raised the truck, removed the hoses, pulled the pin on the thermostat, and he was done. He did not drop or even drain the pan. He did everything with the machine and the cooler lines.

The truck seems to shift a little smoother than before but no issues and all the shifts are fine.
 

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[/QUOTE]EDIT: a power flush has nothing to do with a sealed transmission- you can absolutely drop the pan and exchange about 4 quarts of the fluid. I did that not too long ago, and 1000's of others have as well.[/QUOTE]

I thought that sounded like a bunch of BS when he told me that. He said there is no pan to drop, it's completely sealed.
 

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EDIT: a power flush has nothing to do with a sealed transmission- you can absolutely drop the pan and exchange about 4 quarts of the fluid. I did that not too long ago, and 1000's of others have as well.[/QUOTE]

I thought that sounded like a bunch of BS when he told me that. He said there is no pan to drop, it's completely sealed.[/QUOTE]


There's definitely a pan and it can definitely be dropped. But I'm gathering that it doesn't need to be dropped. Apparently the "filter" inside is just a pickup with a screen on it and doesn't need to be changed like a normal paper filter that will trap particles.
 

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You just don't feel like spending the money? Or you just don't think it's needed?
A little of both. I'm pretty tight, but if I had seen a huge difference in trans repairs between ones that had regular flushes and ones that had never been flushed, I'd probably sing a different tune. I really didn't see a correlation between transmission failure and regular flushing. The guy in that video Metal Monkey posted says every 25k miles. I've already saved enough money in flushes to pay for a fresh rebuild in mine several times over if I used his silly schedule. Of course, I would rebuild the trans myself so I'm looking at less money than most of the people reading this.
Flushing the trans is not a bad idea, I just don't see bad fluid as a cause of transmission failure so I save that money for other things.

As a side note, if your transmission has 150k+ miles I actually recommend against transmission fluid service. The fresh detergents do break loose contaminants from the porous transmission case and can cause issues like sticking valves. I have seen a trend in high mileage transmissions that have never been flushed. the debris that is released along with the higher pressure of the new fluid (which can overpower a weak seal) may kill a high mileage transmission. So, a trans flush can kill an otherwise ok transmission with a lot of miles and buildup inside of it. Not that it will, but it can.
 

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I've done trans flushed 2 ways. I work on medium/heavy duty trucks. We had a big flush machine that has 2 separate compartments. One was for old fluid and one was for new. I hooked up a line to one of the cooler lines to suck the fluid out and the other line was to fill the trans with new fluid. The engine and trans would be already warmed up and ran then idling through the whole process. I did it mostly through the sight glass. It would be dark in the beginning and as the old fluid was sucked out the new fluid would be lighter. I probably went through 20+ quarts of fluid. I forgot to mention this was for a big truck rental company. They enacted this maintenance oto late on some of the trucks which gave trans problems. If they had started this earlier there wouldn't be any problems (as long as everyone was doing it right).

The second way is on my Honda accord. Basically drain, fill and drive through the gears 3 times every 50k miles. Seems to be working fine after 150k miles. This is the way the dealer does it and how the FSM says to do it. They do not use a flush machine. I plan on doing a drain and fill every 10k miles and call it good.
 

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40 years ago, the transmissions were drain and fill. Now we have different fluids, more complex transmissions, and the 'machine' to flush out the transmission. transmissions 40 years ago would last a long time if you did a drain and fill periodically. I'm curious if the flush juice and the machine have introduced new problems. Again, the transmissions are more complex and the fluids have changed too - difficult to point to any one thing as the cause of transmission failures these days.

I'm old school - I don't want to introduce anything that the factory would not have put into the transmission (the flush juice for example). The spill and fill as called here, should be sufficient in my mind. Following a schedule I think should help too. I don't agree with the engine oil changes every 3000 miles that has gotten into peoples heads. With todays synthetics, I'm not sure even 5K is a good number for that. I would think synthetic could go 7500 or even 10k miles. I have a 2001 Nissan car when I'm not driving my Tundra, and the car still uses dinosaur oils. I change it with a quality (but whatever is on sale) oil every 5K. Penzoil, Mobil, Castrol, .. whatever is on sale. 146K on that and runs like a champ still.

My new-to-me 2012 Tundra at 45K will get a "spill and fill" transmission service at 60K intervals.

Another thing to watch - that no one ever changes - is the axle fluids. I do those typically around 90-100K intervals.

Happy motoring.. :)
 

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Since nobody has mentioned it .....
There is nothing in the maintenance schedule or factory service manual that mentions flushing the transmission.
 

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** 623,000 miles on the original transmission **

The machine at Dex's Automotive used about 15 quarts to complete the job because it does a forward flush. He charges $240.00
I bring my own Amsoil so the fee is different.

Note Amsoil ATF will last longer than 'normal' ATF.
 

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I always followed the rule of performing a flush at 100,000 miles and never again. I did have to replace a tranny solenoid at 170k when I bought my truck. I dropped the pan and added 6 quarts in new (don't know where those 2 extra quarts came from). I've put 12,000 on since with no issues.
 

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So a machine flush every 24k to 30k? lmao. Wow all we would do is waste money at the stealership on service! I thought Toyotas were supposed to last? My Ford has made it to 138k with one pan drop, gasket change, filter change and fill. Still shifting and running great. I'm hoping that the Toyota will last a lot longer but ANY vehicle with that many forced changes ought to be in perfect condition in say 1 million miles. If this is the case why is it that transmission don't have some replaceable filter like engine oil filters? There's a line running to the radiator so we're all in there when having work done or doing it ourselves?

Is there an aftermarket system for these space age new transmissions?
 

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So a machine flush every 24k to 30k? lmao. Wow all we would do is waste money at the stealership on service! I thought Toyotas were supposed to last? My Ford has made it to 138k with one pan drop, gasket change, filter change and fill. Still shifting and running great. I'm hoping that the Toyota will last a lot longer but ANY vehicle with that many forced changes ought to be in perfect condition in say 1 million miles. If this is the case why is it that transmission don't have some replaceable filter like engine oil filters? There's a line running to the radiator so we're all in there when having work done or doing it ourselves?

Is there an aftermarket system for these space age new transmissions?
Just had the transmission flushed on my 08 tundra a couple weeks ago at 100k...no 24-30k changes they must work for the oil company to want you to change the fluid every time you drive the vehicle LOL. I used to do 45k services on my older vehicles at the local lube shop as they had the flush machine there to do it and the cost was pretty reasonable...far cheaper than a transmission.

I don't feel that 100k service on a newer transmission is that bad considering the oils we have today. Probably won't wait that long for service on it now, probably go every 50k but even at that, its not exactly expensive. It was about $200 to have the transmission flushed and refilled at the dealership. Called them last week to verify what the service involved, and it was a complete service, they dropped the pan, replaced the filter, flushed the transmission and refilled.
 

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This thread is very informative. My truck has 116k miles on it and I'm thinking about getting the transmission serviced when my next oil change is due, in about 2k miles. I've read some of the debates around this, and my dealer told me that their "flush" is more of a suction, which sounds like the machine described above of pumping the old fluid out and the new fluid in. I know they recommend replacing the plugs at 120k miles, but I doubt i'll let the dealer do that. They wanted $185 to replace the plugs on my mom's 2008 camry. I told them that was crazy, it only had 4 plugs and they were all on top! I had a friend that is a mechanic replace them with the same factory plugs, and a couple other things, and he charged $160 for it all. Can't imagine what the dealer wants to replace the plugs in these trucks.
 

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A suction is only going to pull the fluid out of the pan, the same as doing a drain and fill without replacing the filter/screen. Still only 25% of the fluid. To the few people who say "I've never done it and i have 138k miles", do you do the same with timing belts? Why does VW have a "lifetime" trans fluid that they service? A flush machine merely uses the pumps psi while its running to push the old fluid out and suck new fluid in(thats why mopars dont work sometimes). There is no substantial increase in psi that is going to suddenly break loose new contaminants that weren't there in the 1st place. There is alot of regurgitated opinions in this thread. I will agree that if your fluid smells burnt and looks like molasses i wouldn't flush it either because you may not leave the shop. You can do what you want, don't just use 1 source for your research.
 

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Just to be clear, the only way to do it properly is to flush it, change out the filter/screen, and clean the pan. If you look at some of the debunkers they are saying GM or whoever says not to flush, their procedures only describe a shop that doesnt pull the pan and do a proper clean, replace the filter and inspection. Just clarifying for the naysayers coming to disagree with me.
 

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Discussion Starter #40
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** 623,000 miles on the original transmission **

The machine at Dex's Automotive used about 15 quarts to complete the job because it does a forward flush. He charges $240.00
I bring my own Amsoil so the fee is different.

Note Amsoil ATF will last longer than 'normal' ATF.
If my 'normal' WS ATF has lasted me 100k miles, I can't justify spending the extra money on Amsoil.
 
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