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I have a 2018 Toyota Tundra Platinum with 20 inch wheels. I believe the recommended tire pressure placard inside the driver’s door is recommending a tire pressure that is too low. I have the original OEM tires. The 31 PSI for the front tires is causing the tires to wear quickly on the outsides of the tire.

Anyone else having this same problem?
 

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Low psi would actually cause both the inside, and outside to wear more, while leaving the middle wearing less.

Outside only wear is typically an alignment issue.
 
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As Powertechn2 said, outside only wear would be an alignment issue. If they are low on pressure, inside and outside wear will be similar with outside a little more than inside. If over pressure, center will wear faster than outside.

One thing that will cause outside wear is making u-turns. The faster you make a u-turn, the more wear is put on the outside edge of the tire on the outside of the turn. If you regularly make a u-turn like at the end of a cul du sac, try to slow down a little, don't turn as sharp, and that will help minimize u-turn wear.

I have 18" tires on my 15 CM and I run about 2 psi more in my tires than the sticker indicates because I was getting wear on inside and outside. I have found that running about 2 psi more makes the tire wear more evenly.

The other thing is the design of the tire. Closed shoulder tires (the outside row of ribs are all connected together) will resist outside edge wear better than open shoulder tires (outside row of ribs are individual blocks that are not tired together). If your use is mostly highway and around town, closed shoulder tires are best. If you do a lot of off road, snow, mud, then open shoulder are better. In terms of just plain how they wear and how long they last, closed shoulder is best.
 

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Not sure if everyone else will agree but, in my case, with 20" aftermarket rims, OEM tire size, I'm running 35F, 37R and everything is good.Also, I'm running reinforced tires which, even though many people have different opinions, after testing different PSI's, I found the ones given the best ride...

Just my 2 cents....
Car Automotive parking light Wheel Tire Land vehicle
 

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I run what the tire manufacturer states. Not the door sticker. If you contact the tire mfg, they have an algorithm that they can punch your vehicle in and tell you what the tires should actually be at based on ply count, load handling, as well as gvwr, gawr, etc... Crazy to think that tire mfg's know what they're tires should be at on any specific vehicle, isn't it...

I have an alignment issue, after visiting Firestone. Oddly enough, they managed to make it worse rather than better, and stated that was as good as they could get it. Meanwhile truck was good for 18k miles prior with current mods.

Leveled, with uca's, and they just don't know what they're doing. Nothing is maxxed out.
 
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I usually consider the vehicle manufacturer's door jamb sticker to be the minimum PSI without a load. I prefer to run my tires a few PSI above what's on the sticker to allow room for lugging loads/passengers and will bump the pressure up toward the max listed on the tire sidewall if the load is heavy enough.

I figure the tire manufacturers should know more about their tires than the automakers do.
 

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Atombum, that is really not a good thing to do. The purpose of the air pressure setting the car manufactures put in the door jam is the identify the pressure at which your tire will be flat on the road and will wear evenly as you drive. You want the tire to be flat on the road and making even pressure contact with the road all the way across the contact patch. This gives you the best drivability, even wear, and most importantly, the best braking and steering control.

Over pressured will make the tire bulge in the middle making the primary contact patch in the middle of the tire. This makes the car wander and follow cracks and grooves in the road and reduces braking and steering performance.

Under pressure makes the tire sag in the center and causing it to wear fast on the outside edges, causes more flex in the sidewalls which builds heat and can cause a blowout. and poor drivability as well. And it also can reduce braking and steering control.

If you want to adjust tire pressures based on load, do what Powertechn2 says above which is to get the algorithm from the tire manufacturer and adjust it up or down based on the actual tires you have, vehicle weight, loading, etc. Or, do as I do, which is to put the pressure recommended from the door sticker in the tires and watch closely as they wear. If the outside edges are wearing more than the middle of the tire, add a couple psi. If the middle is wearing more than the edges, remove a couple psi. The door sticker is usually pretty close to correct.

If you change tires ratings or sizes, you have to re-figure the correct air pressure. Again, doing what Powertechn2 says is the best way to determine the new pressure. You can also guesstimate it by looking at the max load rating at max pressure on the new tires vs. the old tires to determine if you should run more pressure or less pressure. To get close, use the formula:

(sticker pressure) / [ (max weight rating of stock tires)X(max weight rating of new tires) ] = (new pressure).

This will get you in the ball park. Don't set them below about 27 psi to start out (no matter what the formula says) and watch how they wear and adjust from there. If you are at 27 psi and they are wearing more in the middle, you can reduce the pressure but be careful. You don't want the sidewall flexing too much building too much heat in the tires, especially if you live in a hot area. That is how Ford/Firestone killed some folks by under inflating their tires.

If you put 1500 lbs in the bed of the truck and you are only going a few miles, you don't need to do anything. But if you are going to drive across the US that way, then you might want to add some pressure to the rear tires to compensate for the load.
 

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I've read a simple test is make a wide chalk line across the tire's tread, using the easily washable "sidewalk art" type of chalk.
Then slowly drive for a few tire rotations, on a smooth flat surface. The chalk will be more worn off on the portions of tire tread that are make better contact with road.
It's a starting point to verify the desired tire pressures will achieve uniform wear, not "scientific".
Of course, if the tire is already worn unevenly, won't work.
 

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You must be thinking of the Ford Exploder...
 

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I remember years ago a truck manf. getting in to trouble by putting too low of a tire pressure inside the door jam. The reason they did that was to “soften” the ride
IIRC, it wasnt the tire label pressure set too low ... it was incompetent owners who never checked tires and were operating at low 20s psi. Tires overheated, blowouts, loss of control, and roll-overs.

Some time after that, the federal "nanny" govt mandated TPS on all new vehicles ... TPS is not without its headaches, and a nice profit margin for dealers and shops to charge $$ for "programming" sensor replacements.
 

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IIRC, it wasnt the tire label pressure set too low ... it was incompetent owners who never checked tires and were operating at low 20s psi. Tires overheated, blowouts, loss of control, and roll-overs.

Some time after that, the federal "nanny" govt mandated TPS on all new vehicles ... TPS is not without its headaches, and a nice profit margin for dealers and shops to charge $$ for "programming" sensor replacements.
Maybe so BUT the firestone tires weight rating was near maxed out ( at proper inflation ) with the Explorer unloaded . So like you said with owners not caring about inflation AND the fact it was super easy to overload the OEM tires rating .... el blammo. Some blamed Furd , some blamed the tires .
 

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Considering that Firestone stated in documents that the correct tire psi was 30psi, and Ford stated it should be 26psi because they wanted better ride quality... Then add in idiocity, and people running around at 20 psi, when the tire mfg had spec'd 30... But Ford mad the door stickers stating less than the tire mfg recommended psi for the load.
Tire mfg's know where their tires should be, not the sticker on the door.

That did actually result in the tpms mandate however, or at least had a strong doing with it.
 
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Considering that Firestone stated in documents that the correct tire psi was 30psi, and Ford stated it should be 26psi because they wanted better ride quality... Then add in idiocity, and people running around at 20 psi, when the tire mfg had spec'd 30... But Ford mad the door stickers stating less than the tire mfg recommended psi for the load.
Tire mfg's know where their tires should be, not the sticker on the door.

That did actually result in the tpms mandate however, or at least had a strong doing with it.
Bingo! The manufacturer's recommendation will usually be canted toward ride quality while the tire manufacturers should be concerned about balancing traction and treadlife.
 
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