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Discussion Starter #1
So my dad is in the market for a newer truck ( he drives an old Nissan PU with over 300,000 miles haha) but he really likes a few 04-06 Tundra's but is concerned because of the timing belt aspect of the engine.
So I wanted to get feedback from you all...have any of you all had trouble with the timing belt. Also how difficult are they to change? He likes to do a lot of work on his own.
Thanks!
 

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Not sure what nissan your dad has but it may have a timing belt in it as well. My 1989 Nissan D21 4x4 did anyhow. Not difficult to change, just very time consuming since you have to pretty much remove the whole front of the engine stuff to get to it in many cases. As far as having issues with them, I haven't seen any threads related to it here. The thing you have to remember is to change it before it breaks LOL...I think the manual says to change it at 80k so its safe to think it will last at least that long, but I wouldn't ignore it at that point.
 

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Not sure what nissan your dad has but it may have a timing belt in it as well. My 1989 Nissan D21 4x4 did anyhow. Not difficult to change, just very time consuming since you have to pretty much remove the whole front of the engine stuff to get to it in many cases. As far as having issues with them, I haven't seen any threads related to it here. The thing you have to remember is to change it before it breaks LOL...I think the manual says to change it at 80k so its safe to think it will last at least that long, but I wouldn't ignore it at that point.
Yes his Nissan does have a timing belt but it is something he worries about and has had to be conscious of. He was kind of looking forward to getting a truck without a timing belt but he likes these gen tundra's. It is something he is concerned about with them since you can't find a used one under 100,000 miles. The mileage really doesn't scare him because of Toyota reliability and dependability but he just wanted to kind of feel it out to see if anyone had issues and the complexity of a change.
 

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Talk him into an 07 with the 5.7...no timing belt, it's a chain. There is on the 4.7 though. They wised up with the 4.6 on the newer trucks, it has a chain as well.
 

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Talk him into an 07 with the 5.7...no timing belt, it's a chain. There is on the 4.7 though. They wised up with the 4.6 on the newer trucks, it has a chain as well.
I have tried haha....he just doesn't like the body style of those as well. He is pretty particular and little on the cheap side too
 

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My 08 has the 4.7 and timing belt. They recommend changing at 90k. I haven't changed it yet due to money, but I will be changing it or having it changed in the next couple of months. FYI, I'm at 101k miles.
 

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My 08 has the 4.7 and timing belt. They recommend changing at 90k. I haven't changed it yet due to money, but I will be changing it or having it changed in the next couple of months. FYI, I'm at 101k miles.
Don't put it off too long. It's EXPENSIVE if it breaks. But on the plus side, I can't recall reading a post about a broken one.
 

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I appreciate it! I agree, I'm hoping this will last me another month and I'll be able to have it done.
 

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I appreciate it! I agree, I'm hoping this will last me another month and I'll be able to have it done.
Oh yeah, I'm sure you'll be fine. Just don't forget about it. My sequoia has 170K on it and I don't know when it was done. I could seriously be on borrowed time. I need to get it done.
 

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i had a 2003 tundra 4.7. i changed the timing belt at 120km (75k miles) after 10 years. they recommend doing the water pump as well (mine had a very small leak only noticeable when they were doing the belt). my recollection it was about $1000 (incl labor and lifetime water pump - non toyota).

of course, now i traded the truck at 133k km. but they did ask at trade in if the belt had been changed ; it is something they consider on trade in value).

i also recommend doing the serpetine belt at the same time if you are paying for labor
 

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If your dad buys a 1st gen or even a 2nd gen tundra with the 4.7L V8 have him make the dealer throw in a new timing belt install as part of the deal.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
If your dad buys a 1st gen or even a 2nd gen tundra with the 4.7L V8 have him make the dealer throw in a new timing belt install as part of the deal.
Will definitely bring it up...but seems like most of the nicer ones we have seen have been private sellers.

Thanks for the feedback everyone...keep it coming!
 

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It's not a difficult job, just time consuming. I would also replace the tension, idler, and water pump while you are in there.

My friend had 286k on his 2001 Tundra on the original timing belt. I was a tech for Toyota and Lexus for over a decade, and have never seen a car or truck come in on a tow truck due to a broken belt. I'm not advocating that you neglect maintenance, just sharing real world experience. As a matter of fact, my 2001 is about 30k past due on a T-belt replacement. I'm not worried about it. I'll get around to it when I have time.
 

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If you are looking private, make sure they show you the receipt for the timing belt with mileage. If they cannot, then assume it has not been done and pay accordingly. I believe you want a receipt for the water pump at the same time.
Dad buying a new belt will give him ultimate confidence.
 

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Talk him into an 07 with the 5.7...no timing belt, it's a chain. There is on the 4.7 though. They wised up with the 4.6 on the newer trucks, it has a chain as well.
The chains are a lot longer lived, but if you modify your engine output you can stretch a chain, and then it's a lot more expensive to a fix than a belt. It was $700 here to get my belts changed on my 2000 at the dealership. One of my other vehicles (The one I modded extensively) has a chain and by increasing the output of the engine I ended up stretching the timing chain...little north of $4000 to swap in a new one, also pricing from the dealership. I'm swapping in a newer lower mileage engine because it's cheaper, and you pretty well have to pull the engine anyways in order to access the chain if you don't have the special dealership tool.

My point is that there are advantages and disadvantages to both. I do still prefer a chain, but belts don't bother me enough to not buy a truck...you just have to change them more often, but they're easier to change so it sort of balances out. My 2000 has 308,500 kilometers on it and doesn't burn a noticeable amount of oil (Judging by dipstick levels...stays right at the top mark) and that's on 10,000 kilometer change intervals on full synthetic. As long as he leaves it how it is he shouldn't have anything to worry about...the 4.7 is a great engine.
 

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It's not a difficult job, just time consuming. I would also replace the tension, idler, and water pump while you are in there.

My friend had 286k on his 2001 Tundra on the original timing belt. I was a tech for Toyota and Lexus for over a decade, and have never seen a car or truck come in on a tow truck due to a broken belt. I'm not advocating that you neglect maintenance, just sharing real world experience. As a matter of fact, my 2001 is about 30k past due on a T-belt replacement. I'm not worried about it. I'll get around to it when I have time.
My friend had a 1993 Toyota pickup with the 3.0L V6 and his timing belt let go at just over 200,000 kilometers. Fortunately the 3.0 is not an interference motor so the valves didn't smash into the pistons...I haven't looked it up, but I have no doubts that the 4.7 is an interference motor (Has to be to be efficient enough to meet emissions etc...won't find any non interference engines in cars anymore), so if the belts did let go it would be bye bye engine. Worth keeping on top of just for that reason.
 

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It is an interference engine. Like I said, I'm not advocating skipping routine maintenance, just sharing my real world experience.
I'm agreeing with you as well...you could run two engines from the same assembly line both stock and with various modifications and they'll all turn out differently. I'm not doubting your experience...just pointing out that a timing belt lasting that long probably isn't normal and at worst is definitely pushing the boundaries of what the belts are deigned to go for...I was told by the dealership here that they're to be done every 160,000 km (~100,000 Miles). I doubt the original owner of my truck did them (No records at any Toyota dealerships in the country), and the friend I bought my truck from bought it at ~210,000 km. I had them done at 290,000 km (1000 km after I bought it from him) and it idled noticeably better (Especially in the cold and didn't make the knocking noise it was making on cold starts anymore...I think they were never done and were starting to stretch a fair bit). It's game over for the engine if it does let go. At least for the top end...top end damage only would be best case scenario, but on a first gen Tundra it would likely write off the truck if a replacement engine isn't available (Depending on mileage etc...if it's low mileage a complete engine rebuild or new motor might not write it off).
 
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