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I currently have a 2017 Tundra with the 5.7 4x4 crew cab with the 38 gallon tank, e rated tires and firestone airbags. I also tow a 30 foot toy hauler about 6500 pounds dry, but loaded (4 seat rzr and 100 gallons of water) I expect to be 8500-9000 pound range. I try go out and use the toy hauler once a month. The Tundra handles it ok, but definitely experience some sway and uneasiness, plus the rzr needs to be loaded all the way to the front not to affect tongue weight. I have an equalizer 4 point weight distribution hitch. Tongue weight is about 1000 pounds, so I am sure I am at the limit in payload and towing capacity.

I am looking for a more comfortable towing experience and was looking at a new Ram 2500 with the 6.4 hemi and 8 speed transmission. I don't think the weight of my toy hauler warrants the need for a diesel.

Has anyone made a similar switch to their trucks? Any regrets? What are your thoughts?
 

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Imho, the only reason to buy any domestic truck is to get a diesel.

If you need to tow weight, might as well have the power to make it effortless.
Otherwise you will just spend more in gas.

Did you consider instead buying the Magnuson super charger for the Tundra?
Also maybe heavy load rear leafs?

That's a big change to an unreliable, no trade in value money pit. Do you tow often enough to warrant that?

Why the huge trailer so tow one small atv? Maybe down size to a more modest trailer with less weight?

In the end, do what makes you happy and feels right for you.

I would never trade a toyota for a domestic truck unless I needed a big diesel to tow huge loads regularly. To many nagatives imho.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Imho, the only reason to buy any domestic truck is to get a diesel.

If you need to tow weight, might as well have the power to make it effortless.
Otherwise you will just spend more in gas.

Did you consider instead buying the Magnuson super charger for the Tundra?
Also maybe heavy load rear leafs?

That's a big change to an unreliable, no trade in value money pit. Do you tow often enough to warrant that?

Why the huge trailer so tow one small atv? Maybe down size to a more modest trailer with less weight?

In the end, do what makes you happy and feels right for you.

I would never trade a toyota for a domestic truck unless I needed a big diesel to tow huge loads regularly. To many nagatives imho.
Thanks for your feedback. Power isn't the issue with the Tundra, it is the handling characteristics when towing heavy and being at it's capacity.

The diesel is about $9k more than the gas version, and I have tossed around the idea of the diesel, but not sure if the extra cost is worth it. The ATV I have is a side by side - Polaris Rzr XP4 turbo, it's big and heavy so I need a bigger toy hauler to fit it. Reliability of the RAM is also a concern as you said.
 

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Thanks for your feedback. Power isn't the issue with the Tundra, it is the handling characteristics when towing heavy and being at it's capacity.

The diesel is about $9k more than the gas version, and I have tossed around the idea of the diesel, but not sure if the extra cost is worth it. The ATV I have is a side by side - Polaris Rzr XP4 turbo, it's big and heavy so I need a bigger toy hauler to fit it. Reliability of the RAM is also a concern as you said.
I have a tundra and when my toyhauler is fully loaded (10k) swaying is minimal. I use a weight distribution hitch n airbags n I dont add a full 100 gallons (50) because water causes too much movement. Even my Ford 3500 super desiel was affected by this not as much though. I normally would add rest of the water before my destination. The Tundra for 10 years has towed the toyhauler was ease with only fuel mileage being an issue. But then again I didn't get great mileage with the Ford towing either
 

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Hi,

I had a 2500... start naming parts, they broke! Transmission, brakes, muffler, radio, sun roof, windows, wipers, multiple recalls. Terrible. It has no power for its engine. At the last transmission issue, they bought it back. I bought a tundra the next day.
 

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Just my opinion, but I owned a new Ram 2500 for 6 months. The problems never ended. I only have 16 ft. trailer to haul my side by side so I never have pulled the weight you are. Took Ram and traded in for new Tundra. I now have an 07 and a 2020 Tundra.
 

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I owned a Dodge product once. Once.

And I have pulled with many different vehicles. Ford F-150 Super Crew, Ford F-150 Ext Cab, Ford Expedition, Chevy 1500 Ext Cab, Chevy 2500 Crew Cab, and 4 different Tundra's.

The Tundra is the best tow vehicle you can get. It's not even a close call.

If it is swaying and unstable, double check your set up. Use a good weight distributing hitch, get the trailer level and use the sway bars to get the truck close to level. If you are getting bucking over a bump, tighten up the spring bars or get stiffer spring bars. The truck and trailer should go over a bump pretty much as a single unit without much of any bucking up and down.

If you are getting swaying, check the weight balance of your trailer. A Tundra has a special anti sway rear suspension design and it should not sway. If it is swaying, make sure you don't have anything heavy in the back. If the water tank and/or grey/black water tanks are in the back, empty them before you pull it. And be careful putting anything heavy on the back like a bike rack with a bunch of bikes on it or a scooter or anything like that. And you can run a good quality anti-sway control, or even two of them if you want. But the trailer should not sway. If it does, don't pull it. Figure out why and fix it.

If you want better side to side control, you could go to up-rated tires like E-rated tires with stiffer sidewalls. I pulled some big trailers with my Tundras and never had issues with side to side control. But if you go that route, make sure they tell you what air pressure to put in the tires or you will have control issues if you run them at the air pressure recommended by Toyota. Good tire shops will have access to a chart to tell you what air pressure to run if you up-rate the tires.

You can also run a rear sway bar to help with side to side control. And some say air bags will help. Again, I never had to do those upgrades to pull a big trailer, but they can make long distance towing more comfortable.

Good luck with your set up.
 
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