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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello there. I'm new here, from Tundrasolutions.com.
Also new to the Tundra, but with some info from a couple other members, I put together a super quick and easy way to permanently rid yourself of the seatbelt reminder chime.

Here's the deal...

First off, I'll start by adding the following disclaimer.. if a mod wishes to do so, please edit in your own legal disclaimer.

Tundratalk.net is not responsible for any modification or misuse of vehicle restraint systems. Modification is soley the owner/modifier's responsibility of liability. Modification is intended as an offroad modification and not for street use. It is your own responsibility to yourself and your loved ones to protect yourself in case of accident.

With that said, I'd like to point out that I contacted two dealerships; Thousand Oaks Toyota, and Oxnard Toyota, and both dealers informed me that this modification was illegal or impossible to turn off the passenger side seat belt chime. I argued with both dealers' service techs that removing the passenger side chime is legal, and Toyota outlines the way to accomplish this.
Simply put... both dealers were total retards.
Anyway, enough ranting, on to the modification:

This was FAR EASIER than I anticipated.

I'm not taking credit for this, just making it easier and condensed to perform yourselves. I'm not quite that smart. :D


1.) Locate inside of seatbelt buckle (portion facing occupant). There is a small hole, and a tab. Push in the tab with a pick or small screwdriver. This will pop the sensor partially from the buckle.
The pick point is pointing out the tab to be pushed:


Grab onto the black plastic sensor and pull it down out of the buckle housing:



It's a long one, so pull it straight down and out of the buckle:



Flipping the sensor over, you'll see the infamous spring that needs to be ix-nayed. I'm using a pick to pull the spring up over the black stub:



Yes... the spring launched into orbit. If you want to keep it.. cover with your hand, etc. I didn't really care. I'll have this truck a long time.

The next picture is the same thing, minus the projectile-spring. The pick is merely pointing at the missing spring. The white plastic clasp will now stay down due to gravity regardless of if there's a seatbelt buckled or not. Keep your seat belt buckled to save lives!



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VERY IMPORTANT UPDATE!!! ADDITION TO PROCEDURE FOLLOWING.

There was an issue with the passenger side airbag not functioning after this mod. (I know, I know.. bit of an oversight for sure.) Thing is, it works on some folks' trucks, not on others. I believe the reason to be that the slider on the clip is not staying down as it properly should have with 'gravity'
Now, I will show you what I did to correct this on my truck.
It's again VERY simple, but I think imperative to proper airbag operation.
I duplicated the no-airbag issue on my Tundra, and conducted various 'tests' to make sure this works, no fail on MY vehicle so far.

Still with the sensor upside down, looking at the circuit board side of it, I merely placed a small piece of tape to inside the sensor, in the 'track' or path that the slider would slide up and down in.
Here's another grainy picture of what I'm referring to:



The principle in the original attempt was for gravity to keep the sensor down. After inspecting my buckle, I believed the issue to be that improper engagement of the sensor back into the buckle to be the problem. Inserting and pulling out to re-insert can leave the slider in the sensor to hang up inside, and nullify the process we did here. To be honest, I'm no expert by ANY means, and this is the best I can come up with.
Why tape?.. Cause it's cheap and easy to reverse! If this doesn't work, then try another method, or put the damn spring back in. But I don't want to make any mods to this system I can't undo later if need or desire be.

Please by all means, ensure the passenger side airbag is ON while there is a passenger (over 45lbs) and buckled up.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Now, reassembly is the reverse procedure.
See the first three pictures for reference. You'll be carefully sliding the clip/sensor assembly back into the buckle.
Be careful pushing it back up into the buckle. I had to make several attempts to get it just right-straight in there. It will require a little bit of a push, but it will 'snap' right in when done properly.

After the chimes are removed, and being that this whole job can take a beginner a few minutes tops, you wont need this anymore:




Here's a link to the thread started by the guy that put in the hard work and higher-quality pics:
Lengthy install, but better pics

This is a link to the thread I posted on Tundrasolutions.com. You'll find that I basically copy/pasted the same over here.
Thread I started
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
And to address a couple questions/concerns...

There is no need to remove anything or disconnect the battery, etc.
The truck will 'think' the seatbelts are constantly plugged in.
The reason being that the seatbelt buckles push down the white plastic clip when engaged. By removing the springs, gravity will hold down the clips. There will be no chimes or lights telling you to fasten your seatbelt.
So, the responsibility is back on you and your passengers to buckle up!

And, as stated, this is by no means an effort to not buckle up. My personal reasons are simply that on the passenger seat, I throw my duty bag there. It's heavy, and trips the belt chime. I'm not going to seatbelt my bag. Also, I believe the sensor to be flawed, as my lady sits on the middle seat, ALWAYS BUCKLED, but the sensor will intermittently sound off... I'm guessing when she shifts around on the middle jump seat.
As for the driver's side.. well.. when I'm parking, getting mail, etc... I like to have my belt off.
But I wont drive without the seatbelt on.

No need to argue or flame for seatbelt chimes. It's a matter of individual preferences. And I can't be more repetitive than to say... Buckle up please.
 

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Thankx 4 the info. It's also quite annoying when you are backing up to hook up to a trailer, having to get in and out. If the chime goes off on it's own while in drive and you stop, put it in reverse, and then back in drive it starts all over again.
 

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I saw this thread on tundrasolutions.com yesterday. I printed out the instructions and it took less than 10 minutes to take out the springs. Works great, no light, no chime. Thanks POS71RS for the detailed instructions.
 

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I find it funny that someone will go to the trouble of disabling a safety feature in a vehicle, and making a procedure for others to repeat it, instead of just wearing their seatbelt.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I find it funny that someone will go to the trouble of disabling a safety feature in a vehicle, and making a procedure for others to repeat it, instead of just wearing their seatbelt.
Everyone has their own opinion... and your concern was answered in my second post right below. If post #2 didn't address your concern, then further comment really isn't necessary.

I really don't think I could have mentioned "BUCKLE UP FOR SAFETY" any more.
I work in emergency services, and I know the importance of buckling up from my own observations of accident scenes, experience, etc.

Besides.... it's technically not a 'safety' feature. It's a reminder of a 'safety' feature, ie, seatbelts.
 

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Yep, I don't need to be reminded to buckle up.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
In reference to an above statement....the chime will turn off when you shift into reverse.
But, when you shift to drive after reverse, it will restart the chime.
What Blueheadturner was referring to was that when parking, etc, a trailer, he has to shift between drive and reverse many times while backing/parking a trailer... and most people would not want a belt around them while turning around while trying to eyeball the trailer.
 

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Thanks POS71RS...guess you have a Camaro somewhere in the garage huh? :)

This made me quite happy...can't stand these sort of idiot alarms. R,

Bart
 

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I find it funny that someone will go to the trouble of disabling a safety feature in a vehicle, and making a procedure for others to repeat it, instead of just wearing their seatbelt.
I think there might be some debate as to whether a little chime is really a safety feature, but that's a side issue.

I wear my seatbelt all the time when I'm driving and have had one save my face many years ago, so I don't really need to be reminded.

When I come home, I stop at my mailbox and get the mail. From there it's maybe 150ft to get to the garage...I really don't like listening to the stupid chime while I'm in my driveway. If I leave my belt off, it's for a reason and no chime or light is going to change that.
 

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I find it funny that someone will go to the trouble of disabling a safety feature in a vehicle, and making a procedure for others to repeat it, instead of just wearing their seatbelt.
Obviously you don't work on a farm. Some of us put our seatbelt on every time we get on the highway but don't want to bother with when going a few hundred feet from the barn to a field at 15-20 mph.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Thanks POS71RS...guess you have a Camaro somewhere in the garage huh? :)

This made me quite happy...can't stand these sort of idiot alarms. R,

Bart
Yessir!

And.. well, it's an ugly POS... 1971 Camaro. Good eye!

It's my 'someday' car. 'Someday', I'll get off my butt and work on her.

 

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Obviously you don't work on a farm. Some of us put our seatbelt on every time we get on the highway but don't want to bother with when going a few hundred feet from the barn to a field at 15-20 mph.
Correct. I work in the oilfield. I spend the majority of my time on roads that previously were travelled by a bulldozer, rock truck, or rig itself. The roads are always rough and I wear my seatbelt for safety plus my job depends on it. My previous comment was directed at the fact that insurance companies can deny claims for disabling safety features on a vehicle. Insurance companies will consider defeating an alarm disabling a safety feature. I asked my agent and verified the question with a claims adjuster who is a friend of mine. He is actually instructed to look for things like that when assessing a vehicle for damages. Insurance companies , while not openly admitting it, look for any reason to deny a coverage or lower their cost on it. The comment I made is in no way an afront to those who choose to do it. To each their own, as such, opinions are the same way.
 

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Great Mod, only took my 5 minutes to do both and works like a charm, I use my truck for a lot more then commuting, I even pull out shrubs and small tree's with it around my house and the buzzer was bothering me.
Thanks again.
 

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Yessir!

And.. well, it's an ugly POS... 1971 Camaro. Good eye!

It's my 'someday' car. 'Someday', I'll get off my butt and work on her.
Hey, that car has a LOT of potential...it doesn't look like a POS to me, just a work in progress that's going to be a very slick ride eventually!
 

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Correct. I work in the oilfield. I spend the majority of my time on roads that previously were travelled by a bulldozer, rock truck, or rig itself. The roads are always rough and I wear my seatbelt for safety plus my job depends on it. My previous comment was directed at the fact that insurance companies can deny claims for disabling safety features on a vehicle. Insurance companies will consider defeating an alarm disabling a safety feature. I asked my agent and verified the question with a claims adjuster who is a friend of mine. He is actually instructed to look for things like that when assessing a vehicle for damages. Insurance companies , while not openly admitting it, look for any reason to deny a coverage or lower their cost on it. The comment I made is in no way an afront to those who choose to do it. To each their own, as such, opinions are the same way.
Thats why insurance companys spend so much time in court. They try to wiggle out of there side of the deal
 

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Correct. I work in the oilfield. I spend the majority of my time on roads that previously were travelled by a bulldozer, rock truck, or rig itself. The roads are always rough and I wear my seatbelt for safety plus my job depends on it. My previous comment was directed at the fact that insurance companies can deny claims for disabling safety features on a vehicle. Insurance companies will consider defeating an alarm disabling a safety feature. I asked my agent and verified the question with a claims adjuster who is a friend of mine. He is actually instructed to look for things like that when assessing a vehicle for damages. Insurance companies , while not openly admitting it, look for any reason to deny a coverage or lower their cost on it. The comment I made is in no way an afront to those who choose to do it. To each their own, as such, opinions are the same way.
I'm very curious about this. Did your friend give you any logical reason why they would care about that sort of chime?

If you're wearing your seatbelt at the time of an accident, what difference would it make if the alarm indicating non-use wasn't functioning? It's got nothing to do with it because the belt was being worn. It's easy to tell if the seatbelt was used or not...it gets melted slightly where it contacts the various attachments to the frame and/or the buckle and leaves a stripe across the webbing. That's assuming you hit hard enough to cause injury...if you don't hit hard enough to cause injury you're not going to be claiming injuries anyway.

I can see that if someone wasn't wearing their seatbelt, was injured and claimed they were wearing it and insurance company might have an issue, but they're going to know it wasn't being worn anyway by the little telltale on the belt. So they're going to come back and say "you weren't wearing your belt so we're denying your claim because you disabled the chime to tell you to wear it. Granted, if you hadn't disabled the chime and you didn't wear your belt we'd still deny your claim because you ignored the chime." ????? That just doesn't make sense to me.
 

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With the way insurance companies work, I tend to think logic is illegal. I agree with you on the fact that it makes no sense. My favorite complaint has to do with house insurance. Owning a large breed dog in a home lowers attempted breakins by 642%. Do you get a break on insurance for that? No, they increase your insurance or deny from some policy's because of the threat of dogbite....

With regard to the seatbelt chime though. It isn't an interlock being defeated, since the belt still works, however, I asked about that very thing and he said the insurance company could state that you modified the seatbelt mechanism or damaged the internal workings of it if it ever failed. Granted, it never would, but in the event that it did, you might be up shit creek without a paddle if it went to court. Most lawyers don't understand mechanical processes from my experience and logic would fall on deaf ears.
 
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