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Discussion Starter #1
I'm planning to tow a 3500# travel trailer with a 5.7L Tundra.

I understand that a WDH is not required because the TT is under 5000#, but that a "sway bar" is required because the TT is more than 2000#.

When Toyota says "sway bar" are they referring to something like the TRD rear sway bar that mounts on the Tundra? I know that trailers can also have sway bars with some of them integrated into a WDH.

Also, does the Trailer Sway Control feature of newer Tundra's made a sway bar not necessary for a 3500# trailer.

These seem like basic questions, but I've spent hours on the internet and haven't found clear answers.

Thank you for your help.
 

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Sway bar is the anti-sway bar that you need on the hitch. Friction bar should work if not going to WDH. I would load the trailer and hook it up to the truck and see how much the truck squats. You may still need a WDH if the truck squats too much. Might want to get WDH anyway for stability as it will put weight back on the front.

Rob
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Sway bar is the anti-sway bar that you need on the hitch. Friction bar should work if not going to WDH. I would load the trailer and hook it up to the truck and see how much the truck squats. You may still need a WDH if the truck squats too much. Might want to get WDH anyway for stability as it will put weight back on the front.

Rob
Glad I posted the question, because my guess (wrong) was that Toyota was referring to a rear sway bar on the tow vehicle.

In my internet searches, I didn't see much in the way of stand alone sway control. Most such devices seem to come as part of a WDH. In fact, the link that ARBORBARBER posted is a sway control device made to be used a part of a WDH.

If this is true, then the most practical way of getting sway control seems to be to buy it as part of a WDH (do I have this right?). Does that mean to be in compliance with Toyota recommendations, one must buy the WDH for trailers in excess of 2000# just to get the sway control?

This seems like overkill to me for 2000-4000# trailers. What do most people do? Disregard Toyota's recommendations for such relatively light trailers and go without sway control? Would this create a liability problem if you were in an accident?

Thanks again,
 

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All depends on the trailer, conditions, weight distribution, etc.

If I had a larger but light camping trailer that was like a big ass box on wheels, I would use a sway/wdh hitch. Why not? They are fairly inexpensive.
 

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I agree mostly with Powertechn2.
The anti-sway is not so much weight as it is in "sway". The movement of the TT when an 18-wheeler flies past is what the sway-bar is all about.
Secondly, the sway-bar can be installed independently of a WDH. But this is where I agree with Powertechn2. Why not just buy a 1000/10000 WDH? They are relatively inexpensive and makes everyone (including your insurance company!!) happy.

Don
 

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I really like Andersen’s WD hitch for lighter trailers. It’s very easy to use and works great, and is quiet. It also controls sway without a friction bar.

https://andersenhitches.com/Catalog/4-droprise-wd-kits.aspx

I used it pulling a 4500lb camper many times with nothing but great things to say about it. I’ve pulled trailers with the bar style and while they do work they are much harder to use and make a lot of noise.

You can mount a friction sway control without a WD hitch but you will be much happier with the end result if you go ahead with a hitch.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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For even a 3500 lb trailer I still would use a WD hitch. Just a anti-sway bar is going to control maybe 50% of the sway, where as a full WD hitch controls 90% of sway.

I presently pull a 28' RV trailer coming in at #6600 dry. Maybe #7600 when loaded.
 

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How a trailer is loaded has a big influence on how it handles when towing. If you load(and drive) well you might be able to avoid the need for anti-sway. That said, I'm in the camp of "just buy a good WDH with anti-sway." I wouldn't call them cheap, but you can find them used around. It's worth the money and effort to not arrive at camp stressed out from towing.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I really like Andersen’s WD hitch for lighter trailers. It’s very easy to use and works great, and is quiet. It also controls sway without a friction bar.

https://andersenhitches.com/Catalog/4-droprise-wd-kits.aspx

I used it pulling a 4500lb camper many times with nothing but great things to say about it. I’ve pulled trailers with the bar style and while they do work they are much harder to use and make a lot of noise.

You can mount a friction sway control without a WD hitch but you will be much happier with the end result if you go ahead with a hitch.


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After doing some more research, this the same conclusion I came to.

Thanks all for the excellent advice.
 

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I have a TRD Sport with anti-sway bars front and rear. Those lessen the body roll of the truck in turns/curves.

An anti-sway bar for towing a trailer is a different animal all together and as inexpensive as they are, I feel a no brainer... just get one! It, along with proper loading of the trailer, will aid in keeping your truck and trailer traveling straight and more stable when say wind or a passing semi disrupt you making you go side to side which could lead to a roll over.

I tow a travel trailer that is under 5000 lbs and have both a Curt brand weight distribution hitch and anti-sway bar. My tundra squats 1" in the rear when hooked up and there's no change in the front. The combination makes a sweet towing set up and I hardly know the trailer is there unless I look at my fuel mileage. :D

Hope that helps a little.
 

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Sway bars use the weight of the trailer to stabilize it. Sway bars can effectively reduce the amount of side-to-side movement of the trailer by bracing the weight of the vehicle against its chassis. The bars distribute the weight of the trailer evenly so that it will not sway too much even if a force is applied to it. Is that right?
 
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