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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
OK, I really don't want to drill the center out and use an easy-out because I've seen too many of them break. Any other advice? I don't mind buying any tool I need but the goal must be to risk no further damage beyond the plug itself.

Don't want to heat it but I might do it anyway if I must.

I think, what I am looking for is a miracle tool. Something that won't simply continue to destroy the aluminum plug..

I'll settle for a magic trick.

Ideas?
 

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Drilling absolutely would be a last resort in this case; filings could fall into the case to cause you problems later. Heating is not a good option either.

I would probably find some of these pricey hex extractor tools (about $50+ from various sources) to buy or borrow, and give them a try:

Sock It Out - Home | Sock It Out
 

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If it's the drain plug use an extractor and suck the fluid out.
Fill plug....heat it or weld another bolt to it.
He says it's aluminum, and that sounds about right if it's rounded out.

Welding aluminum will require special equipment and skills (heliarc), but a welding or machine shop might be able to weld some aluminum hex stock to it ($$$). ;)
 

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I've had luck in the past trying to tighten the stuck plug just a bit. The plug may not be stripped as badly when turned in that direction. Then back it out when it's broken free.
I've also ground down a slightly oversized hex wrench, tapering the tip then tapping it into the fudged up hole.
Heat usually helps a lot.
 

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I've had luck in the past trying to tighten the stuck plug just a bit. The plug may not be stripped as badly when turned in that direction. Then back it out when it's broken free.
I've also ground down a slightly oversized hex wrench, tapering the tip then tapping it into the fudged up hole.
Heat usually helps a lot.
Good idea on grinding down something and beat it in. I've done this more than once....
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Drilling absolutely would be a last resort in this case; filings could fall into the case to cause you problems later. Heating is not a good option either.

I would probably find some of these pricey hex extractor tools (about $50+ from various sources) to buy or borrow, and give them a try:

Sock It Out - Home | Sock It Out
Thanks but it's 10mm internal hex which is now mostly round inside. I need heavy duty with a positive bite.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
He says it's aluminum, and that sounds about right if it's rounded out.

Welding aluminum will require special equipment and skills (heliarc), but a welding or machine shop might be able to weld some aluminum hex stock to it ($$$). ;)
Yes that is on the list but far down the list. I hope it doesn't come to that
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I've had luck in the past trying to tighten the stuck plug just a bit. The plug may not be stripped as badly when turned in that direction. Then back it out when it's broken free.
I've also ground down a slightly oversized hex wrench, tapering the tip then tapping it into the fudged up hole.
Heat usually helps a lot.
I'm leaning toward some heat and driving something slightly oversized into the rounded whole. Still, I don't have a lot of faith in this. Thinking it might just make the round hole bigger.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
What do you think about this?
 

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They look like they are meant to file an aluminum hex plug to round.
Dremel a slot into the existing plug edges, heat, use an impact driven large flat head to remove.
The flat head driver must span the entire plug (both sides).
It is the fill plug, no?
 

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Thanks but it's 10mm internal hex which is now mostly round inside. I need heavy duty with a positive bite.
I think the principle behind the tool is it's a tapered hex, as has been suggested, and like the previous suggestion, it is driven into the rounded hex to tighten it. If you have good skills, grinding a sacrificial hex wrench will be much cheaper than the tool.

If it were my problem, I would get it out with a sharp cold chisel by placing the edge on the right side of the plug, and applying lefty-loosey torque with the chisel and hammer. Worst case, if it didn't screw out, then I would continue until that sumbeach could be pried out, like the top of a can of cocktail weenies. Care with the housing threads would be essential.

I would not apply heat to aluminum. Aluminum has a very high coefficient of expansion, and the metal is subject to "galling", a process where friction between the thread surfaces will tear metal particles from one thread surface and deposit on the other, or, the particles just rumble along between the two surfaces increasing the friction still further. You might only succeed in "welding" (not literally) the plug in place. Heat works for cast iron, but I am doubtful for aluminum.
 

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...Dremel a slot...
Dremeling a slot on one side of the plug to provide significant purchase for a eccentrically driven chisel is a fine idea. The rest of that...Sorry, not too keen on. BWDIK, only did this for a living. ;)
 

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I used a modified chisel and a hammer drill in hammer only mode, that was after a week of trying every other method I could find on the webs short of welding a nut to it.
 

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Is there enough plug lip to hit the outside with a chisel bit?

I personally have used heat on aluminum plugs in steel/cast housings. The point is to heat the outside area around the plug so it expands.

Before you get to that point you have to decide which version of a removal device you want to use.

The extractors pictured above do work pretty good. I have also used EZ-outs more times than I can count.

I also wouldn't personally be afraid of drilling it out, grease the bit, it will catch most shavings, or drill while using a blow gun, then just before poking through grease the bit, and go slow. Drill bits in their design bring most pieces out.

Can also flush everything once done.


Rule number one of doing a t-case, or diff fluid change. Remove the fill plug first, because if it doesn't come out, you at least still have fluid in it.
 
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I think, what I am looking for is a miracle tool. Something that won't simply continue to destroy the aluminum plug.
Toyota drain and fill plugs are steel, not aluminum.
I deal with this a lot at work.
The solution I use (and it works every time) is to heat the plug really hot with an oxyacetylene torch and then use a chisel or air hammer on the circumference of the plug to turn it counterclockwise.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Toyota drain and fill plugs are steel, not aluminum.
I deal with this a lot at work.
The solution I use (and it works every time) is to heat the plug really hot with an oxyacetylene torch and then use a chisel or air hammer on the circumference of the plug to turn it counterclockwise.
I can assure you, the transfer case drain plug is aluminum. It has a shoulder and gasket so, as a last resort, I will cut off the shoulder as the threads are fine pitch and not tapered.
 

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I can assure you, the transfer case drain plug is aluminum. It has a shoulder and gasket so, as a last resort, I will cut off the shoulder as the threads are fine pitch and not tapered.
Think you could use your phone to take and post a pic?

I can't visualize how you can even see the threads, let alone know that they were "fine pitch". A better understanding of this "gasket and shoulder" might help us brainstorm some better ideas. Sorry, but I have not seen a modern Tundra transfer case (mine's 2WD); the last Toyota transfer case I saw a long time ago WAS aluminum, and almost certainly would have had aluminum plugs.
 

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I can assure you, the transfer case drain plug is aluminum.
I am here to help, not to start an argument, but in 12 years of working for Toyota, I have never ever seen an aluminum drain plug on any vehicle.
Also, the transfer case plug on the Tundra is a 24 mm 6-sided regular bolt head, not a 10 mm hex Allen key.
The 10 mm Allen key plugs are only used on the front differential on the Tundra.
So I have to assume that is an aftermarket plug, not a factory one.
 

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I am here to help, not to start an argument, but in 12 years of working for Toyota, I have never ever seen an aluminum drain plug on any vehicle.
How the heck does this not qualify for one of mechanics fastest and most simple tests: the magnet?

What a great stay last night at Holiday Inn Express.
 
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