Toyota Tundra Discussion Forum banner
1 - 20 of 52 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
87 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I wanted to get some input over an experience I had at my local independent service shop. I took my 2010 Tundra (with 101K miles) in for an oil change. Background: I’m the original owner and had the dealership do the oil service for the 1st two years (included with purchase) then this shop has maintained it since. I received a call early that morning stating they found metal on the threads of the drain plug when they removed it. The service advisor indicated that they could try tapping it out but I told them I didn’t want to take a chance with my motor over attempting to modify the plug/treads. I stated that it sounds like the previous tech may have over tightened the plug. The advisor stated this can happen over time. They ended up installing a new pan to resolve the issue.

I had informed them I had a squeak coming from the rear brakes. The same shop had performed a rear brake job at 80K miles (August 2016). When I picked up the truck, they documented the following on my service order: “Rear rotors are glazed up, resurface recommended” but listed on the work order that they “cleaned rear rotors” at a cost of $45. The squeak was still present so a buddy (long time Chrysler mechanic) of mine took a look at the rotors and said they used some sort of wheel on the end of a drill. He said that technique rarely end in positive results.

Not happy with the turn of events, I returned the following day and asked for my old parts. As they were in getting the parts, I witnessed them removing an expansion plug from the pan. It took two guys to pull it out. I can’t figure out why they would have installed an expansion plug. He gave me the pan and after taking a look, I observed there were no threads at all. I asked him why there were no threads. He stated they had pulled through. When he called, he said there was metal on the threads of the plug when he removed it so this didn’t occur when the plug was installed. There was also some pink material that looked like finger nail polish around the plug hole on the pan as if someone had glued the plug in place.

I took the truck to another shop a few weeks later to address the squeak. They turned the rotors to resolve the issue. While they were test driving, they notice pulsing in the front brakes indicating the rotors need to be turned. I don’t tow and am not heavy on the brakes. This same shop just installed new factory pad and turned the rotors in April (90k miles) of this year. Could this be possibly caused by over torquing the lug nuts?

Thoughts?
Thanks,
Mark
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
837 Posts
I wanted to get some input over an experience I had at my local independent service shop. I took my 2010 Tundra (with 101K miles) in for an oil change. Background: I’m the original owner and had the dealership do the oil service for the 1st two years (included with purchase) then this shop has maintained it since. I received a call early that morning stating they found metal on the threads of the drain plug when they removed it. The service advisor indicated that they could try tapping it out but I told them I didn’t want to take a chance with my motor over attempting to modify the plug/treads. I stated that it sounds like the previous tech may have over tightened the plug. The advisor stated this can happen over time. They ended up installing a new pan to resolve the issue.



Thoughts?
Thanks,
Mark
THIS is exactly why I have a fumoto valve on every car.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,076 Posts
I'm sure you know this now, but...DO NOT GO BACK to that place. At best they are grossly incompetent; at worst, they are crooked as a snake. If you have a BBB in your area, you can try to get some help that way. YMMV with local BBB efforts. Otherwise, your last and most painful option is to chalk it up as bad experience.

This is exactly why I do all the maintenance on my vehicles that I am strong enough and smart enough to do myself! :(
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
87 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I'm sure you know this now, but...DO NOT GO BACK to that place. At best they are grossly incompetent; at worst, they are crooked as a snake. If you have a BBB in your area, you can try to get some help that way. YMMV with local BBB efforts. Otherwise, your last and most painful option is to chalk it up as bad experience.

Thanks for your response. We live in a small community and this shop has great reputation. I want to follow up with them but want to ensure that I'm in the right going forward. Would love to hear from a few techs stating these pans don't need to be replaced cause the threads give way over time. They've been wrenching on for the last 75K miles so nobody else could be suspect. I told the guy over the phone there was a reason I don't go to WalMart for oil changes. This is what I would expect to happen.

Also looking for feedback regarding the front rotors. Seems odd that I had to have them resurfaced 12K miles after the front brake job with no towing involved.

Thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,183 Posts
In the year I've been here on Tundra Talk I have read of no accounts of the drain bolt or drain pan female thread stripping. Them "just stripping" sounds to me like deep inside the cave of stupid.

The rotor issues I have read about here on TT. Though my position is that I've never had any rotor issues on Toyota vehicles since 1985. 6 Toytotas. My direct comparison is my 1997 T-100 4WD truck. Quarter million miles and it rolls on the stock Mama Toyota rotors.

I think you need to be stern and strictly factual with the shop. Any good business values their customers feedback. Even the not-so-good.

Report back and update us.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Marko44

·
Registered
Joined
·
87 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
In the year I've been here on Tundra Talk I have read of no accounts of the drain bolt or drain pan female thread stripping. Them "just stripping" sounds to me like deep inside the cave of stupid.

The rotor issues I have read about here on TT. Though my position is that I've never had any rotor issues on Toyota vehicles since 1985. 6 Toytotas. My direct comparison is my 1997 T-100 4WD truck. Quarter million miles and it rolls on the stock Mama Toyota rotors.
Thanks for your response. I should have added that I replaced the stock rotors up front with "StopTech Slotted Brake Rotors" back in July 2014 @ 51K miles. I paired them with Hawk LTS pads which I didn't like. I went back to OEM pads in April 2017 @ 90.5K miles and had the rotors resurfaced at that time. So I only have about 11K miles on the resurfaced rotors and they needed to be turned again. That's why I was asking if over tightening the lug nuts could cause warped front rotors (steering wheel shimmy while braking)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,183 Posts
Over tightening of wheel lugs certainly doesn't do any GOOD. If you're having a shop do your oil then you're likely having them rotate your tires. That said you can absolutely count on a shop to insanely over tighten wheel lugs. Wheel lugs only need somewhere between 76 and 85 pound-feet. Shops can ram them down to 120+ pound-feet. Not only imparting issues to your rotors but making it near impossible to get them off, on the side of the road, at midnight, in the dark on a distant road. I've always rotated my own tires in the driveway and hand torqued the lugs.

When a shop has put new tires on I've asked them to write on the service order "hand tighten lugs to 76 pound feet." But also when I get home I break all the lugs loose and hand tighten/torque them myself.

Warping of rotors almost always is tied in with HEAT. Rotor heat. To that end I always drive my Tundra smart so as to minimize the amount of pedal braking. YMMV.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Marko44

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
638 Posts
I'm sure you know this now, but...DO NOT GO BACK to that place. At best they are grossly incompetent; at worst, they are crooked as a snake. If you have a BBB in your area, you can try to get some help that way. YMMV with local BBB efforts. Otherwise, your last and most painful option is to chalk it up as bad experience.

Thanks for your response. We live in a small community and this shop has great reputation. I want to follow up with them but want to ensure that I'm in the right going forward. Would love to hear from a few techs stating these pans don't need to be replaced cause the threads give way over time. They've been wrenching on for the last 75K miles so nobody else could be suspect. I told the guy over the phone there was a reason I don't go to WalMart for oil changes. This is what I would expect to happen.

Also looking for feedback regarding the front rotors. Seems odd that I had to have them resurfaced 12K miles after the front brake job with no towing involved.

Thanks
I have to surmise they have some common core grads working there.....I've been shade treeing for over 40 years and have NEVER 'wore out' a drain plug !!, even my Army motor mechanics never screwed up like that.
As for the brakes, good reputation should no longer be a sole qualifier.
Example my brother and I did the front brakes on his jeep. This meant removing the pins cleaning them up and lubing them with never seize, new pads, rotors, fluid flush. Made sure pads would retract, test drove and then drove it for his next four week rotation shift work.
On his next 7 off he came down to visit and went to his former (used to work there so he trusted them -yeah) shop for shock replacement and rear brake job.
They came back told him he needed the fronts done too. 800 bucks later he got his new shocks and brakes all around......When he came back and told me I was livid....damn it should have gone with him to pal around and shit....

I don't bad mouth even bad businesses but if ever asked about them I tell folks why I would never let XYZ work on my dog.
The point is it sounds like they take advantage of trusting folks...... I drive 17 miles out of town to use a different shop to handle work beyond my tool inventory and skill set for that reason......hope you get it all sorted out and maybe don't be so trusting....the older you get the easier that part gets......I'm now the cranky old fart I used shake my head at as a kid....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,076 Posts
I have to surmise they have some common core grads working there.....I've been shade treeing for over 40 years and have NEVER 'wore out' a drain plug !!, even my Army motor mechanics never screwed up like that...
THAT'S what I'm talking about.

A steel drain plug stripped in an aluminum pan...that would be beyond incompetent, but understandable. A steel drain plug stripped in steel pan threads? That's beyond incompetent...that has to be deliberate use of a breaker bar.

Not to mention charging $45 to "wire brush" your "glazed" rotors?...dishonest robbery. Hell, they should have turned them for that much money.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
467 Posts
...they notice pulsing in the front brakes indicating the rotors need to be turned. I don’t tow and am not heavy on the brakes. This same shop just installed new factory pad and turned the rotors in April (90k miles) of this year. Could this be possibly caused by over torquing the lug nuts?

Thoughts?
Thanks,
Mark
My front rotors warped as well. The issue, it seemed, is that the brake pad pins were not lubricated causing the front pads to stick which resulted in the warped rotors. My rotors had not progressed so far that they needed replacement so they turned them and lubricated the pins. No problems since.

--Matt
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,183 Posts
I haven't read accounts of what I'm about to describe, here on Tundra Talk. But have heard it a LOT and have lived it with motorcycle brakes and rotors.

The brake pads get pushed onto the rotor to effect your stopping power by pistons in the calipers (you push pedal, pedal pushed brake fluid, brake fluid pushes piston, piston pushes brake pad.......you slow down). If your caliper pistons don't go in-and-out correctly (in this case, return back to their "neutral" position in the caliper) then they can/will stay unacceptably in contact with the rotor. THIS will produce unnecessary, unwanted and not-designed-for HEAT. It can then be a short hop to warped rotors.

Hey Tundra Talk guys, any of you have experience with a full Tundra caliper rehabilitation? Pull everything apart including the pistons out of the calipers? And then put all back together? I'm not at all familiar with how the Tundra calipers are designed and built. Is a complete caliper rehab a smart move to be considered?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,076 Posts
Over tightening of wheel lugs certainly doesn't do any GOOD. If you're having a shop do your oil then you're likely having them rotate your tires. That said you can absolutely count on a shop to insanely over tighten wheel lugs. Wheel lugs only need somewhere between 76 and 85 pound-feet. Shops can ram them down to 120+ pound-feet...
It seems Toyota has revised recommended lug nut torques upward over the years. Current owner manuals call for 97 lb-ft on aluminum wheels, 154 lb-ft on steel wheels.

Probably done to satisfy government nannies, and people who NEVER look at their wheels/tires.
 
  • Like
Reactions: riccnick

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,183 Posts
It seems Toyota has revised recommended lug nut torques upward over the years. Current owner manuals call for 97 lb-ft on aluminum wheels, 154 lb-ft on steel wheels.

Probably done to satisfy government nannies, and people who NEVER look at their wheels/tires.
Holy coconut Gilligan. PURE insanity. You read it here first: you will NEVER get those wheels off on the side of the road with the factory lug wrench. NEVER. You can't put them on by hand to that torque. PURE insanity.

:eek::eek::eek::eek::eek::eek::eek::eek::eek::eek::eek::eek::eek::eek::eek::eek::eek::eek::eek:

I just rotated (2nd time) the 20" aluminum Mammoth wheels & tires on my Tundra. I again hand torqued them to 84 pound-feet.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8,115 Posts
, even my Army motor mechanics never screwed up like that.
.
HEY COME ON...This former Army Mech takes slight offense...

















Not really...Hooah

I'm with you. I've changed the oil on every vehicle I've ever owned. Weather it was in a field next to my house or at the Auto Hobby Shop on base. NEVER stripped a plug....and always tightened to my calibrated wrist. I've also never changed a "crush" washer.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
540 Posts
It’s always disappointing hearing about shops that pull this crap. The one and only reason a drain plug in a Tundra gets stripped is human error, period! The shop should own it, fix it and be done. Scuffing the rotors and running the same pads only serves to line the shops pockets. It won’t help squealing brakes.
This shop sounds either crooked or incompetent.
Sorry for the rant, just tired of shops taking advantage of people.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,076 Posts
...Hey Tundra Talk guys, any of you have experience with a full Tundra caliper rehabilitation? Pull everything apart including the pistons out of the calipers? And then put all back together? I'm not at all familiar with how the Tundra calipers are designed and built. Is a complete caliper rehab a smart move to be considered?
The short answer: Generally...not worth it.

The Toyota Tundra Repair Manual has a detailed section on how to rebuild the calipers...I don't know for whom, since not even their own technicians will rebuild a caliper. If you've got time on your hands, and want to take on a caliper-rebuild just to see, you could do that. I would probably find an expendable spare caliper at the junkyard for the exercise. Just do a good inspection...if the piston bores are deeply-pitted or heavily-scored, then it's probably game over for rebuilding that caliper.

First of all, a caliper should not be "rebuilt" until brake fluid is "running down your Tundra's leg". If it ain't leaking, my thought is...don't fix it. My experience with Toyota calipers has been very good; for over 30 years and 178K miles on my old 4Runner, I never had a caliper leak (fronts only) and never replaced one. So from the days of Japan-sourced parts, they were good calipers. I can't really say now, but I believe it's the same company with the same quality standards.

A leaking caliper usually means that a seal, or seals, has been worn out or torn. This is usually due to negligence of brake system fluid maintenance, i.e. change it every year-or-so if you don't want have oxidation crude and corrosion build up in your system. Because...if you have crude and corrosion in your brake system, it's likely that the seal(s) of that leaking caliper have been worn by corrosion products, and/or the scoring of the piston bore(s) caused by those corrosion products. So...if you have a leaking caliper, you likely have scored piston bores(s); and, replacing the seals is only going to result in them prematurely wearing out again by the pre-existent scoring.

When you buy reman calipers, you have no control over how the previous owner of those cores maintained his brake system, but it doesn't matter because the cores will be inspected, and the bores returned to new condition. I expect if the piston bores are lightly scored or pitted, a minimal machining operation (precision grinding) is done to "clean-up" the bores. If the bores are heavily-scored or deeply-pitted, then the bores can be machined out and a sleeve installed with interference fit; i.e. the sleeve is manufactured to a dimension slightly larger than the cleaned-up bore, and cooled until it shrinks to fit inside the bore. The beauty of sleeving is that it allows you to use other materials, such as stainless steel or brass that are much more corrosion resistant.
 
  • Like
Reactions: RingSteel

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
638 Posts
It’s always disappointing hearing about shops that pull this crap. The one and only reason a drain plug in a Tundra gets stripped is human error, period! The shop should own it, fix it and be done. Scuffing the rotors and running the same pads only serves to line the shops pockets. It won’t help squealing brakes.
This shop sounds either crooked or incompetent.
Sorry for the rant, just tired of shops taking advantage of people.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
and be glad you're not a woman or sent yours to get the repairs done, cost would be over the top no doubt!
 
1 - 20 of 52 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top