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Figuring out what is wrong may not be easy. You might try to start with the basic brake stuff like doing a full fluid system bleed, master cylinder test, etc. But once you go beyond the basics of the brake system, it may get very complicated. If the Brake assist is coming on too easily, there must be some sensor that determines when to activate it, and maybe that is the issue. You have officially exceeded my knowledge base. Good luck, but do let us know if you figure it out!
 

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Discussion Starter #42
So I have torn into the brakes and I have found a few issues. First off the caliper pins, despite being greased and cleaned last year were corroded and seized. So i am replacing those. The pads them self were seized into the calipers, and the rotors and pads were glazed. I have cleaned up the rotors and pads, removed the glaze from the pads and the rotors and lubricated all the slide points.

I also checked the calipers. The front right caliper seemed to have one piston that was a little sticky. It would retract, but required more effort than the others. And I couldn't seem to get it to pop out as by pushing another in like all the others did. So it's not seized, but definitely not moving as well as the others. Interestingly that side as even pad wear while the drive side has slightly uneven wear despite all the pads moving fine.

These Ontario winters are just brutal on parts, I can't believe how fast brakes rust and seized up due to the winter conditions.
 

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Does it stop any better now?
 

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Discussion Starter #44
Does it stop any better now?
Yes, much improved. The ABS doesn't seem to come on as easily either. Since I sanded the pads and put cleaned and put a cross hatch pattern on the rotors I decided to try and re bed the brakes. That seemed to make them bite much better and smoother than previously. I am still not completely happy with the brake feel, but like you said, it's probably the aftermarket components. Once these pads are more worn, I will go back to OEM.

Do you have any tricks on keeping these brakes freed up in harsh climates? Short of taken them all apart, and cleaning and lubricating, while replacing the caliper pins on at minimum annual basis, is there anything else you can do? Any recommendations on the best brake lube?
 

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Glad you got things working better. I have been using Wagner Thermoquiet ceramic brake pads on my last 3 tundras and they are excellent pads. They brake strong, no brake dust on the wheels, and they seem to last very well. They have been excellent. When I change them, I change front and back together to keep the brake pad friction coefficients the same from front to back.

As for suggestions for corrosion resistance, on the pins, if you fill the area with grease, then nothing else can get in there so the pins will resist corrosion. I think there is a rubber boot over those pins if I remember right, so fill that tube with brake pin grease and that should really help. Make sure to use the pin grease because it is a special high temp grease for brakes.

As far as the pads sliding in the calipers, not sure what to say. I have not had a big problem there, but being in the northern Midwest is not as harsh as your conditions, so no suggestions there. You could try a high temp paint but I am not sure that is really going to hold up to the heat of the brakes. I have seen brake calipers that are powder coated, so maybe that is an option. Not sure.
 

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Discussion Starter #46
I should have clarified, its' the front caliper pins that rust out all the time. This despite the fact I clean and coat them with brake lubricant. The front pads were also seized tight into the caliper it self, and had to be pounded out. I cleaned up the edges of the pads and lubricated them. They now move much more freely. With four pistons to seize and the exposed pins, it's just not the best design for a salty environment, IMO. I noticed some aftermarket calipers are available with a zinc coating. I wonder how well that holds up? Typically around here, brand new cars will have a lot of rust on their calipers rust in a 2-3 years.

The rear pins are fine and never an issue. They are well seated and the brake lube keeps them moving nicely. The problem on the rear is the little ears will seize in the stainless steel clips after a while. Lubricating helps, but too much and it just gets fill with dirt from the road and sticks, too little and they seize up solid. But the rear sliding caliper, that most cars have these days, does seem to hold up better than the front design.

The more I drive the truck, the better the brakes are feeling. I am pretty certain the fact my front pads nearly seized in the calipers along with the brakes being glazed was causing the majority of my issues.
 

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I believe in math and the laws of physics. There's no way interrupted braking force will stop a vehicle faster than continuous braking force. Go out and pull your ABS fuse, do a stop at full lockup, and then do a stop manually pumping the brakes. Report back. I'll bet all of my money on the results.
As a physics major, I believe that too.

However, the coefficient of friction (Mu) for a sliding tire is substantially lower than Mu for a rolling tire.

So, simple physics says that a sliding stop (with lower Mu, same normal force) is longer than a threshold braking stop. Pumping is, well, amateur hour...

The exception is on a gravel surface, where the gravel piling up in front of the wheels enhances stopping ability.
 

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Does your front calipers have the boots over the pins? Here is a ebay add for some. I thought these were standard on the tundra, but maybe not. If not, add these, fill them with grease, and that should really help with the pin corrosion.

https://www.ebay.com/itm/Disc-Brake-Caliper-Guide-Pin-Boot-Kit-Rear-Front-CARLSON-16005/163085019687?fits=Year:2007|Model:Tundra&epid=75197317&hash=item25f89fea27:g:nscAAOSwtRlbnOYW
I realized after I sent this that the Tundra brake caliper has two sets of pins, one set to guide the caliper, and one set that goes through the brake pads. You are probably having issues with the pins that go through the brake pads. I think the boot kit i referred to above is for the caliper guides. If you could cover those pins with something like this to protect them, it might help. If you figure anything out, let us know.
 

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Discussion Starter #50
I realized after I sent this that the Tundra brake caliper has two sets of pins, one set to guide the caliper, and one set that goes through the brake pads. You are probably having issues with the pins that go through the brake pads. I think the boot kit i referred to above is for the caliper guides. If you could cover those pins with something like this to protect them, it might help. If you figure anything out, let us know.
Yes, I am speaking of the guide pins for the front brakes, which don't have boots. These are the only pins for the front brakes and they rust out badly, even if coated with brake grease. I usually remove and clean and grease them when I change the wheels. I also have replaced them several times when they get too rough to save.
 

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Do you have any tricks on keeping these brakes freed up in harsh climates? Short of taken them all apart, and cleaning and lubricating, while replacing the caliper pins on at minimum annual basis, is there anything else you can do? Any recommendations on the best brake lube?
The Toyota factory maintenance schedule calls for a brake service every 16000 kms or 1 year, whichever comes first, so what you have been doing as far as lubing, cleaning everything regularly is the only thing you can do.
We use antiseize paste on the front caliper pins and edges of the pads where they contact the caliper.
It does wear out after a while though, and the maintenance cycle repeats itself.
 

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We use antiseize paste on the front caliper pins and edges of the pads where they contact the caliper.
It does wear out after a while though, and the maintenance cycle repeats itself.
Any idea if it is like permatex (alum, copper, graphite) or more of a synthetic?
 

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We have permatex type copper based paste and also aluminum based antiseize spray in the shop.
The guys use whichever they prefer.
 

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Discussion Starter #54
The Toyota factory maintenance schedule calls for a brake service every 16000 kms or 1 year, whichever comes first, so what you have been doing as far as lubing, cleaning everything regularly is the only thing you can do.
We use antiseize paste on the front caliper pins and edges of the pads where they contact the caliper.
It does wear out after a while though, and the maintenance cycle repeats itself.
I typically service the brakes once a year and it was about a year ago I last serviced them. It seems this last winter was so harsh they the front pads still seized up regardless. I have never tried antiseize, it doesn't get washed off by water and salt? I have been using Kleen flow Brake lubricant, which seems to hold up fairly well, but obviously not well enough to last through this last winter.

https://www.acklandsgrainger.com/en/product/p/KLF331?gclid=Cj0KCQjw1pblBRDSARIsACfUG12UogtSvHl3xRMExGrnkBCsg1LnYMRZr_SooEkXJgBtfQs54TH6vS4aAl17EALw_wcB&cm_mmc=PPC:+Google+PLA&ef_id=Cj0KCQjw1pblBRDSARIsACfUG12UogtSvHl3xRMExGrnkBCsg1LnYMRZr_SooEkXJgBtfQs54TH6vS4aAl17EALw_wcB:G:s&s_kwcid=AL!3645!3!303439922063!!!g!543732699249!

I have a big bottle of the copper based anti-seize. Maybe next time I will try it.
 
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