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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My 2010 tundra with 56K miles all stock started making a squeeking or metal rubbing sound mostly when making left turns. I did rent a wood chipper the other day and it seemed worse trailering it. Not while braking but sounds like a brake dust cover to me. Needed an inspection anyway so took to my garage. They couldn't find anything nor did they hear the noise on a test drive. Doesn't do it while going straight. Went back the next day and put the mechanic in the rear seat and took him for a drive. He said noise is coming from rear. Took off rear tire and the back brakes are more worn then the fronts. He rated the fronts at a 4 and the back at a 3. They looked thin to me. Said he would replace rotors and pads on the back within 6 months but they pass inspection.
Ok so I do tow a 6000 pound RV about 5 times a year which has brakes but why did the rear wear faster than the front? Usually its the other way around. Only other towing is occasional mostly rented equipment so not far.

Any guesses on the noise? They were assuming it was coming from rust on the rotors or the pads on the rear. The ends were pretty rusty.

I priced rotors and pads from Sparks for OEM and I am ok with the price but is there a better quality without going over board.

Thanks!
 

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Are you the original owner? Is it possible the fronts were replaced at some point already?

Otherwise the backs should never wear faster than the fronts.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Yes I am the original owner. I agree that backs should never wear sooner than fronts or at least I have never seen it. The garage new the truck was mine from new and I think he just looked at the fronts and assumed the backs were fine.

I wonder if there is anything that the dealer can do in regards to the back brakes and warranty. Maybe not pads but rotors.
 

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When your mechanic rated your front & rear brakes did he actually measure the thickness? The fronts being 4 and the rears a 3 puts the wear fairly close if that is indeed what they are. Had the difference been greater I would have suspected that the calipers were not fully releasing (ie frozen). Frozen calipers were/are a common problem with certain model years of the Toyota 4Runner. May not be a problem with the Tundra put it might be possible.

If the Tundra is like most vehicles, the parking brake works off of the rear wheels. It might be a good idea to check that the parking brake in your Tundra is working properly and releasing fully when it is disengaged. If it is not working properly that might explain the difference in wear. Also, is it possible that you have driven your Tundra with the parking brake on or not fully disengaged occasionally? I have done that myself now and again which might explain some difference in pad wear as well.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Yeah he measured the rear pads while I was standing there. Did the fronts on Saturday when I was not there.
I am sure its possible that I have driven with the parking brake on for a short time but there is a beep if its on hard and not released.
We did turn the rear tires when it was on the lift and it didn't seem to me that the caliper were stuck.
I just hope the rotors and brakes are the cause of the rubbing. I am a little reluctant to replace the rotors and pads with Toyota since I only got less than 60K miles out of them.
 

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When your mechanic rated your front & rear brakes did he actually measure the thickness? The fronts being 4 and the rears a 3 puts the wear fairly close if that is indeed what they are. Had the difference been greater I would have suspected that the calipers were not fully releasing (ie frozen). Frozen calipers were/are a common problem with certain model years of the Toyota 4Runner. May not be a problem with the Tundra put it might be possible.

If the Tundra is like most vehicles, the parking brake works off of the rear wheels. It might be a good idea to check that the parking brake in your Tundra is working properly and releasing fully when it is disengaged. If it is not working properly that might explain the difference in wear. Also, is it possible that you have driven your Tundra with the parking brake on or not fully disengaged occasionally? I have done that myself now and again which might explain some difference in pad wear as well.
It wouldn't be the parking brake. That is a drum setup on the inside of the rotor on the hub.

FYI, my back brakes went before the fronts. Worn down bad and making noise. The truck was leased by a paving company, and I got it with 33,529 miles on the clock. The front brakes had not been replaced. I attributed it to towing.
 

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Rears will wear out much faster if you are activating the "auto LSD". This system uses the rear brakes to stop wheel slip.

Not sure this relates to your situation, but I wanted to put that out there...
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Well I feel better that someone else had back brakes go first.

So just go with Toyota rotors and pads. I know Adavance has the Warn parts but I am always a little leary that the fit is as good.
 

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It wouldn't be the parking brake. That is a drum setup on the inside of the rotor on the hub.
Thanks, I did not realize that was the setup on the Tundra.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I did see when looking at the Sparks parts list there was a separate brake pad for the emergency brake. We did not look at that when we had the wheel off last night but I guess that could be the problem too. Since it was already 5:30 the mechanic didn't want to open it up in case it was not easy to get back together. I need the truck today.

Thanks for all the help so far.
 

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The noise when turning seems to be a common issue lately.
I've had my front right rotor off 3 times trying to find the noise, still can't figure it out. It grinds when turning right.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I agree I did a search on here and a lot of people mentioned a rubbing noise when turning left but I did read any definite fixes. I will be sure to post back if changing the backs stop the noise.
 

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I wouldn't be surprise that your rear wears faster than front.. My 2009 accord is common for that.. I have 35k on it right now, I have replaced to rear set and soon front set.. Forums and others say they're common due to the abs module program they're using... I brought it to dealer numerous time asking about it... Techs, are saying they have been replacing rear more than fronts.. It's just the way it's made lol
 

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the noise you were hearing is from the lip of the drum portion of the rotor. what happens is when rust builds up on the rotor and on the backing plate. The lip of the drum will make contact with the backing plate, most noticeably when making turns.
There is a TSB that has you replace the backing plates, in doing that TSB you must also replace the wheel bearings.
So as long as your are within your warranty your good to go.
However most trucks that come in with this issue are not in warranty.
So instead of selling the customer alot of expensive parts and labor we have come up with a solution where you use a brake lathe and cut back a small amount of metal on the lip of the drum to increase the gap between the rotor and backing plate.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Thanks! So if I take it to the dealer they will cover it under warranty? I am a few miles short of 60K miles.
I did order the hawk lts pads and power slot rotors since I will need them soon enough but would like to get the noise backing plate issue fixed. My fear is I put on the brakes, take to the dealer, and then they say its the after market brakes.
 

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If the dealer wont cover it, I would try some sand paper.Its not a brake lathe but you may be able to clearance it enough to stop the noise.

Sent from AutoGuide.com Free App
 

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My VW is known for wearing rear brakes faster than fronts, like at 2x. My experience shows that is true. It is because, at least for my VW, they bias the rear brakes to come on sooner than the front, so as to help prevent nose dive. "Electronic Brake Distribution" or EBD. I'm guessing other makes do likewise, not sure about your truck. But a truck is going to wear the rear brakes faster, or should, as when towing the rear brakes can certainly do more work than in the unloaded case.

I've run into the problem, on my VW and now my Camry, where the rear brakes sieze on the slides. The sliders are just fine, it's the stainless steel shims that cause problems. Rust gets under them, and the pads fail to slide properly. I sanded down both cars and used some brake grease to both help prevent further rust and to help them slide better.

Not sure if that is an issue here, but we were very upset to find our Camry had low rear brakes at 2yr/50kmiles after the last dealer visit--I had to check it out, and found the pads siezed. I think from now on I'm just going to disassemble the brakes once/year and lube for better life.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
the noise you were hearing is from the lip of the drum portion of the rotor. what happens is when rust builds up on the rotor and on the backing plate. The lip of the drum will make contact with the backing plate, most noticeably when making turns.
There is a TSB that has you replace the backing plates, in doing that TSB you must also replace the wheel bearings.
So as long as your are within your warranty your good to go.
However most trucks that come in with this issue are not in warranty.
So instead of selling the customer alot of expensive parts and labor we have come up with a solution where you use a brake lathe and cut back a small amount of metal on the lip of the drum to increase the gap between the rotor and backing plate.
So if I simply replace the rotor with a new non rusty rotor the noise will go away. Guess I don't under stand the term drum portion of the rotor. It is going to the dealership tonight but I have new Hawk brakes and slotted rotors sitting at my house reading to go on.

What is different about the new backing plate? Is it smaller in size to increase the tolerance?
Thanks Jason
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Ok I took t to the dealer and they said noise coming from rusty rotor they wanted to turn the rotors and put on new pads which were needed.
I already had new rotors and pads at home so took it to my mechanic. He said when they pulled off old rotors they had shiny spots on the back where they made contact with the backing plate.
New rotors on for less than 20 miles but get the same rubbing noise which I assume is the same contact between rotor and backing plate when making turns. Straight OK.

Think the new rotors will wear in and noise go away?

Should I try sanding the backing plate?

Is the TSB backing plate fix a smaller backing plate increasing the tolerance between the rotor?

Guess this moved from towing to more of a mechanic issue. Sorry
 
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