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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My 2018 Tundra 1794 just passed the 29,000-mile mark and the maintenance light came one. This is not the same as the “Service needed light”. I was still over 1,000 miles before my next oil service was due.
My vehicle does not fall into the Special Operating Conditions listed in the owners manual.

I took my truck to the dealer where I purchased it from and the advisor recommended I have the “Induction maintenance” performed as well as a “Brake System Fluid Flush” See attached receipt.
I cannot find those services listed in my maintenance supplement at all.

My real question centers around whether they even did the work they charged me for. I’ve attached a photo of the left rear brake bleeder valve.

In the old days when we would flush brake lines, we had to loosen the bleeder valve to purge the lines go through the whole process and there was always some sort of residual fluid on the surface. In this case, it doesn’t even look like the rubber boot was removed. It looks like the system has never been touched.
Is there a way to “Flush the Brake system” without having to bleed each brake line?

Was this work really needed and if so, is there a way to verify it?

Thank you
 

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I hate to be the bearer of bad news, but you were the victim of a wallet flush. Don't get me wrong, looking at that picture it does appear that there was a wrench on that bleeder and the rubber cap looks to me to have been handled, but those services were not necessary. I used to work in a dealership environment and this is a common way to make money for the dealership. Induction cleanings are only helpful for direct injection engines where you don't have an injector spraying gas on the back of an intake valve. Your truck has port fuel injection i.e. fuel is being sprayed on the back of your intake valves and being cleaned constantly, so you would not benefit from an induction cleaning. As for your brake fluid flush, that should be done when you are replacing your brakes and not before unless you never drive the vehicle and your brake fluid is 5+ years old. Brake fluid is hydroscopic meaning it absorbs moisture and should be changed at every brake service unless you burn through a set of brakes once a year, then every five years is fine. The problem is when you do a brake flush, the person doing it is probably filling the reservoir all the way to the max line. When you go to do a brake service, you risk quite a mess when pushing the calipers back due to no room in the reservoir. The reservoir kinda acts as a brake measurement device i.e. the fluid gets lower as the brakes wear. Hope this is informative for you and always be sceptical when a service writer says "oh by the way".

Sent from my moto z4 using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thank you for the response. I agree with your term "Wallet Flush" I went back to the dealer and asked them where these services are recommended by Toyota and the advisor told me those are not manufacturers recommendations but "Dealer Recommendations". One of the "service advisors" offered to check the quality of the brake fluid with a test strip, which he did. The fluid looks brand new. I asked if they tested it "before replacing" it and he said no. When asked why not he simply said they "don't typically do that" I stared at him for a second and realized he didn't really care about providing honest necessary services. No wonder dealers have such a bad reputation.

I'll take this as a moderately expensive lesson and be prepared for the next free oil change. (dealership offered free OFL and TR for 4 years). Ii expect the next visit they will probably want to do several other "Dealer Recommended services" but I'll pass.

Thanks again
 

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Not sure where you are at but a few months ago here in Central Texas, I brought my wife's 2015 Pro 4-Runner with 70,000 miles to get it's service. They told me the rear brakes were metal on metal and that they would need to flush the brake lines too because the fluid was "dirty." They quoted me some ungodly amount to do all that and I told them I was going to shop around. The service advisor had the nerve to tell me that I would have to sign something stating that I knew the vehicle wasn't safe to drive if I didn't get the work done. Anyways, I didn't do it and instead we brought it to a local mechanic. He showed me new brake pads and held them up the "metal on metal" pads the dealership claimed needed to be replaced. There wasn't much of a difference and the mechanic told me that I could probably get at least another 20,000 miles on them. Also had him check the fluid and it was fine.
Long story short - we decided we wouldn't go back to our dealership and called our salesperson at the dealership that we buy from to see which one of their service advisors he recommended. He said not to take it there. Apparently there is a push by somebody from Gulf States Toyota or wherever to "up sell" service. Again, not sure where you are from but I don't buy Toyota to get forced into paying for maintenance that isn't needed. Pretty crappy.
 
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I hope that they washed the truck. Because you got taken to the cleaners the truck should have been taken to the cleaners as well. I read all the way through the work order and I saw an oil change and a tire rotation, that was maybe needed. The only time my vehicles goes to a dealer it it's a warranty problem or a recall. Our Toyota dealer is a good dealer and fair. I don't go to them, first it's to far 150 mile round trip (yes that is the closest Dealer) and second, I do my own maintenance and tire rotation. I'm 68 and will keep doing my own maintenance until it hurts to much to crawl under a vehicle. I also have a 2008 4Runner and 2016 Scion iM and on both vehicle, maintenance is done by me.

CAD-Man
 

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[/QUOTE]
No, that was not needed.... You can complain to the dealer and in writing to corporate. Brake fluid will go a long time. Wouldn't hurt to change it out every three years, but what that dealer charged is exorbitant. Get a price from a local shop at that time, next time.

Your induction system doesn't need to be serviced with any "BG" product...in fact that is discouraged usually in the owners manual. Service the air filter as recommended in the owners manual, but buy one from a parts store and change it yourself...keep the receipt. The cabin filter can be cleaned with compressed air, and changed out if it looks very dirty, depends where you drive. That service writer was a taking advantage of you,
 

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I prefer a brake fluid flush every 3 yrs approx, IMO helps prevent rust & other issues.
The $130-ish price quoted didnt seem bad at all, independent So Calif mechanics often charge 120 & up per hour, dealers are 150 & up.
The problem is, Will they do it correctly? Some mechanics just crack open bleeder valves on each wheel and let fluid drip out, TOTALLY UNACCEPTABLE.
Most cars should be pressure flushed from the master cylinder to each wheel, and then need diagnostic tool to properly bleed the ABS module. But I'm not yet familiar with Tundra's details, my 2018 has only 5500 miles and I've only done one service on it, a DIY oil+filter, and installed the all-metal filter housing
 
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