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Discussion Starter #1
I know this is a Tundra Forum not a Sequoia Forum but I'm more likely to get a straight answer here...

I just purchased a 08 sequoia 4x4 from a dealer and it has a suspension lift on it (my guess is 3 inches as its measuring 79 inches high now) and a set of 20x9 wheels with quite a bit of offset as they stick off about an inch and a half outside the fenders. This is for my wife to drive around Houston so while I want to keep the lift I want to put a set of OEM 20 inch wheels on there with some michelin LTX AT 2's in 275/60R20 which will be great for the city/hwy and also be aggressive enough for any off road situation we find ourselves in. Any issues with putting this LT tire on a Sequoia? We plan on towing a heavy boat (up to 5000 lbs) with this so I wanted a beefier tire. Comments?

Big question is will there be any issues with returning the tires/wheels to stock if the new stock wheels don't have any backspacing/offset like rubbing etc? Will there be any impact on the stability of the vehicle with the narrower tire on it? Currently there are 305/55R20's on there and they are about 12 inches wide, so the new tires would be 10.5 or so width. With the lift should I go for stock wheels and get the michelins in 305 vs 275? I want to get decent mileage but safety (especially extra roll over factor due to higher center of gravity with the lift) is paramount for the wife and kids daily driver.

Final question is tire sensors, how do these work when you swap out the wheels? Any advice appreciated.

Thanks in advance for your help.
 

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TPMS are swapped from wheel to wheel and installed not a problem there. now when it comes down to the wheel and tire fitment it all boils down to the offset and how they lifted the truck previously (spindles usually kick the wheel out further apprx 1" per side). now if going back to stock wheels the offset is usually around +60 (offset numbers are like so the higher the number the more is sucks the wheel "in" toward the centerline of the vehicle, the lower number or negative offset pushes the wheel and tire outward away from the center of the vehicle). I would start by finding out what offset you have on the wheel that is currently on the truck and then go from there (say it has a 0 offset and sticks out 1.5" then all you need is a +30 to get the tire to be close to flush with the fender (apprx). But again remember that when going with a larger tire backspacing/offset can be both your friend and enemy lol
Good luck
 
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