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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was reading this thread in the Release/Pricing sub-forum, and really appreciated all of the advice given. I do have a question, though. It seems like much of the advice was geared toward negotiating on new vehicles. When buying a used vehicle, would you also employ the strategy of contacting several dealers, telling them what you want and at what price, and have them work against each other?

For example, would I email 3-4 Toyota dealerships and tell them that I am looking for a 2007 and up DC with less than 50,000 miles, the 5.7, short box, steering wheel controls, and bucket seats in either Blue, Silver, or Pyrite Mica for $19,000 out the door? Is this strategy used often? I've always bought private party or from a no-haggle lot like Carmax, so I'm new to dealing with traditional dealerships with the intent to buy.

I apologize if this should be in another forum, but there seems to be a lot more traffic here, and it seems like a general enough question. TIA!
 

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that concept of putting them against each other really wont work here , most dealerships will say mine is better bc it has , a carfax that is clean , was driven by an old lady , has custom wheels , lifted , we offfer a lifetime warranty , ours is extra clean , and so forth , being the 2007 is almost 7 years old financing is not going to be the best compared to a newer , unless you just pay with cash. personally I only buy new cars from private owners. I find they are more honest , have all the documentation for work and maintenance and are willing to work with u if you have a fistful of cash. I assume you are looking to pay around 16,500 to 17,000 for the truck . I would start at autotrader and be very specific and see what is out there . Good Luck
 

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Just check autotrader and craigslist yourself IMO...
Most dealers go to the same auction, so by contacting a few you might inflate the price in your market.
I searched for well over a month for mine... No trade makes it easier on ya for sure. No problem with financing a used truck if your credit is good. I got 1.74 on my 08.
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
that concept of putting them against each other really wont work here , most dealerships will say mine is better bc it has , a carfax that is clean , was driven by an old lady , has custom wheels , lifted , we offfer a lifetime warranty , ours is extra clean , and so forth , being the 2007 is almost 7 years old financing is not going to be the best compared to a newer , unless you just pay with cash. personally I only buy new cars from private owners. I find they are more honest , have all the documentation for work and maintenance and are willing to work with u if you have a fistful of cash. I assume you are looking to pay around 16,500 to 17,000 for the truck . I would start at autotrader and be very specific and see what is out there . Good Luck
Thanks! I figured that it wouldn't work well, but was wondering if anyone had ever tried it. FWIW, the year of the vehicle doesn't bother me as much as the actual mileage and condition of the vehicle. I'd be willing to pay more for a newer vehicle, but don't want to get to the point where I'm just a few thousand away from buying a new truck. IOW, if the right deal presents itself, I'm all over it.
 

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I think you are on the right track. I wouldn't email them, because then you will be constantly inundated with emails from them for years to come! LOL... speaking from experience.

I'd recommend driving to the lots and seeing what they have in stock.
Stick to your budget. If you want to be at 17k out the door, then that is your FINAL OFFER.
don't let the salesman attempt to BS you with monthly payments BS, blah blah blah.

Be direct and tell them that you want this truck and you want it for 17k out the door, if they can make it happen, then good.. if not then try elsewhere.

Of course be prepared to be visit the same dealerships at least 3-4 times... maybe even more.

My truck had an asking price of 28k and with fees and taxes etc, it would've been easily 30K+

I went and drove them nuts for close to a month, on every weekend.. and finally got the truck i wanted with the features, color I wanted for 25k out the door....

Also have a look on autotrader and other auto sites, ebay, CL... put a distance of up to 200 miles and give the dealers a call... a 3-4 hour drive is worth it if you are saving thousands....

good luck and hope you are able to find the truck you want!
 

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Just check autotrader and craigslist yourself IMO...
Most dealers go to the same auction, so by contacting a few you might inflate the price in your market.
I searched for well over a month for mine... No trade makes it easier on ya for sure. No problem with financing a used truck if your credit is good. I got 1.74 on my 08.
that is one hell of a good used truck rate, was that with toyota or a credit union, i wasnt all that concern about APR i was thinking length of time they were willing to go , I love lover payments and paying it off earlier at my own pace

I kinda forgot about craigslist , down here in florida it seems to be very hard to work your way through the crap that is on there < phishing , rip offs , dealers posing as private owners > to find good private owner deals
 

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It can work, but you have to do the legwork first. I use cars.com for just about everything. It'll give you a broad inventory of all the surrounding dealers in your area. If you do happen to find two very similar trucks, at two different dealers, with comparable mileage and price, you can in fact use one as a leveraging chip. But if there is anything obvious about one or the other that is different, the dealer will throw it out, saying its not comparable to theirs.
 
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
that is one hell of a good used truck rate, was that with toyota or a credit union, i wasnt all that concern about APR i was thinking length of time they were willing to go , I love lover payments and paying it off earlier at my own pace

I kinda forgot about craigslist , down here in florida it seems to be very hard to work your way through the crap that is on there < phishing , rip offs , dealers posing as private owners > to find good private owner deals
I'm the same way. I prefer longer terms, even if the interest rate is a little higher. It's a simple interest loan, so I usually pay it off early anyway. I like the flexibility of not having to make a huge payment if I don't want to. Case in point, we financed $17,000 of my wife's car at 4% over 60 months. We triple the payments and will have it paid off 2 years into the loan.

My credit rating is 768, so I'm not concerned about qualifying for lower interest rates, especially since I'll pay it off early anyway.
 

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Rex, up to 60 months and yes a credit union.
Pentagon federal
I bought mine through a VW dealership, walked in with financing.
 

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I think a lot of this depends on the area you live in and what the dealer stock is like at the time. When I was looking around NONE of the dealers would budge on their sticker price. NONE of them. I couldn't believe it. They claimed that the Tundras were in such high demand that their 'already aggressive pricing' couldn't be lowered. PSSHHH
 

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I don't get why some of you think calling around and getting some initial input on what's in stock and basic pricing isn't helpful. Unless you've got lots of free time on your hands there's NO WAY I would recommend going into the dealership in person to do your feeling out. That's a sure fire way to waste 1-2hrs of time per dealership and put yourself under more pressure to make a deal you're not happy with. Now I still recommend doing some homework on cars.com or autotrader.com so you're armed with some basic info and can intelligently speak to what's out there when you talk to a dealer. I wouldn't recommend throwing out your bottom-line price in any conversation until you're making a final deal. That just gives them a number to work up from from.

Every car deal I've done in the last few years has followed the same recipe. Call three or four dealerships (or as many as you want). Tell them the basics of what your looking for (model, features, colors, whatever). Ask them if they have anything in stock that meets those criteria. When they say yes, simply ask them what price they're asking for it. You can say "thanks, that's pretty competitive" or "wow, that's way outside the ballpark of what I'm seeing everywhere else". You'd also be surprised how many folks will say, "I'm asking $X for it but realistically I could do $Y" without you even saying a thing. Now you start seeing who wants to deal and who doesn't. In the meantime, you're developing some rapport with the dealer that can be helpful later. Once you've got a couple dealerships throwing out some realistic prices you can call one of them and say "Hey, Joe Blow Toyota is asking for $X for a tundra with A, B, C features. But I really like this one you have. Or I'd really rather deal with you. Can you meet or beat that deal?" In the midst of all of this you still haven't committed to what you want to pay. You haven't had to talk about trades. You haven't had to worry about what financing angles they'll try to work. All you're doing is getting real data on price. You haven't spent hours sitting at a salesman's desk waiting for him to talk to his manager, and if the conversation starts heading off in the wrong direction you can easily wrap it up or hang up.

Tell me how this isn't advantageous?
 

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I don't get why some of you think calling around and getting some initial input on what's in stock and basic pricing isn't helpful. Unless you've got lots of free time on your hands there's NO WAY I would recommend going into the dealership in person to do your feeling out. That's a sure fire way to waste 1-2hrs of time per dealership and put yourself under more pressure to make a deal you're not happy with. Now I still recommend doing some homework on cars.com or autotrader.com so you're armed with some basic info and can intelligently speak to what's out there when you talk to a dealer. I wouldn't recommend throwing out your bottom-line price in any conversation until you're making a final deal. That just gives them a number to work up from from.

Every car deal I've done in the last few years has followed the same recipe. Call three or four dealerships (or as many as you want). Tell them the basics of what your looking for (model, features, colors, whatever). Ask them if they have anything in stock that meets those criteria. When they say yes, simply ask them what price they're asking for it. You can say "thanks, that's pretty competitive" or "wow, that's way outside the ballpark of what I'm seeing everywhere else". You'd also be surprised how many folks will say, "I'm asking $X for it but realistically I could do $Y" without you even saying a thing. Now you start seeing who wants to deal and who doesn't. In the meantime, you're developing some rapport with the dealer that can be helpful later. Once you've got a couple dealerships throwing out some realistic prices you can call one of them and say "Hey, Joe Blow Toyota is asking for $X for a tundra with A, B, C features. But I really like this one you have. Or I'd really rather deal with you. Can you meet or beat that deal?" In the midst of all of this you still haven't committed to what you want to pay. You haven't had to talk about trades. You haven't had to worry about what financing angles they'll try to work. All you're doing is getting real data on price. You haven't spent hours sitting at a salesman's desk waiting for him to talk to his manager, and if the conversation starts heading off in the wrong direction you can easily wrap it up or hang up.

Tell me how this isn't advantageous?

These are great points. I would also tell you to not be afraid to branch your search out further to other surrounding states as well. I can tell you that where I live, Tundras are pretty popular and we do not have a high number of dealers as in Texas for example. Because of that, I know I could get the same truck down south for at least 2-3000 dollars less than what I could get it for up here. For that kind of savings, if not more, I would not hesitate in jumping on a one way ticket and driving the new truck back on a road trip.
Different markets command different pricing and you need to take that into account as well.
 

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Not sure about your area.. but I haven't heard of any dealers actually making a negotiation over the phone with a stranger.. and you sure as hell won't get the best deal over the phone..

you need to be in person and you need to know how to negotiate to get the price you want..

you can call and ask around.. but not one of them will realistically give you their "bottom" price over the phone... that'd be just plain stupid...

Best of luck with your purchase and hopefully you find what you are looking for at what you perceive to be the best price... because that's ultimately what it boils down to... you feeling that you got the most for your hard earned $$


I don't get why some of you think calling around and getting some initial input on what's in stock and basic pricing isn't helpful. Unless you've got lots of free time on your hands there's NO WAY I would recommend going into the dealership in person to do your feeling out. That's a sure fire way to waste 1-2hrs of time per dealership and put yourself under more pressure to make a deal you're not happy with. Now I still recommend doing some homework on cars.com or autotrader.com so you're armed with some basic info and can intelligently speak to what's out there when you talk to a dealer. I wouldn't recommend throwing out your bottom-line price in any conversation until you're making a final deal. That just gives them a number to work up from from.

Every car deal I've done in the last few years has followed the same recipe. Call three or four dealerships (or as many as you want). Tell them the basics of what your looking for (model, features, colors, whatever). Ask them if they have anything in stock that meets those criteria. When they say yes, simply ask them what price they're asking for it. You can say "thanks, that's pretty competitive" or "wow, that's way outside the ballpark of what I'm seeing everywhere else". You'd also be surprised how many folks will say, "I'm asking $X for it but realistically I could do $Y" without you even saying a thing. Now you start seeing who wants to deal and who doesn't. In the meantime, you're developing some rapport with the dealer that can be helpful later. Once you've got a couple dealerships throwing out some realistic prices you can call one of them and say "Hey, Joe Blow Toyota is asking for $X for a tundra with A, B, C features. But I really like this one you have. Or I'd really rather deal with you. Can you meet or beat that deal?" In the midst of all of this you still haven't committed to what you want to pay. You haven't had to talk about trades. You haven't had to worry about what financing angles they'll try to work. All you're doing is getting real data on price. You haven't spent hours sitting at a salesman's desk waiting for him to talk to his manager, and if the conversation starts heading off in the wrong direction you can easily wrap it up or hang up.

Tell me how this isn't advantageous?
 

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On a new vehicle you can negotiate over the phone. I've done it a few times. On a used, it is better to get a list price and go see it if it is near your price.
Better to see it, drive it and then talk price. Be ready to walk. And don't talk trade in until you get the bottom price.
 
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