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If it's screeching with your foot OFF the brake it is the "squealers"
You need new pads soon.
Thx I appreciate it. If the rotors have some good meat left and they are still smooth, I can just put on pads without cutting or replacing the rotors right? I just don't wanna go to the dealer or a shop and get the typical "gotta replace it all" answer....
 
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It is usually best to get the rotors resurfaced when replacing pads.
But it is not necessary.

As long as you are not getting pulsation in the pedal you should be fine.
Many Napa stores have a brake lathe tho, and you should be able to get the rotors resurfaced for about $15 or so each.

Just remove the rotors and have them resurfaced yourself.
Not that big of a job really.
 

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I've read that the rotors never really get warped...that it's just an inconsistent transfer of the pad material that gets embedded into the rotor...and that to minimize the likelihood of this happening it's best to "brake-in" the pads and bed them....
 

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I've read that the rotors never really get warped...that it's just an inconsistent transfer of the pad material that gets embedded into the rotor...and that to minimize the likelihood of this happening it's best to "brake-in" the pads and bed them....
They do warp, you can tell very easily when you throw a rotor on the brake lathe, they are warped and it's not added material from pads. It usually happens to cheaper and weaker rotors faster ie small inexpensive cars.


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They do warp, you can tell very easily when you throw a rotor on the brake lathe, they are warped and it's not added material from pads. It usually happens to cheaper and weaker rotors faster ie small inexpensive cars.


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Exactly.
Get a bad one on a lathe and you can easily see the bend in it.
Sometimes it is bad enough that you can't machine it out.

Truck rotors will usually "hot spot" if they are badly overheated.
They get pits in them, and it ruins the rotor.
 

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They do warp, you can tell very easily when you throw a rotor on the brake lathe, they are warped and it's not added material from pads. It usually happens to cheaper and weaker rotors faster ie small inexpensive cars.


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What is said is that the brake material become so embedded into the rotor that you can no longer distinguish it from the rotor material. Cementite is what it's called I think.

It's really hard to believe that cast iron would warp because it doesn't cool fast enough to cause the warping. Cast iron is slow to heat and slow to cool...I could see it happening if it were a different alloy and maybe they do make rotors out of something else on smaller cars...
 

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What is said is that the brake material become so embedded into the rotor that you can no longer distinguish it from the rotor material. Cementite is what it's called I think.

It's really hard to believe that cast iron would warp because it doesn't cool fast enough to cause the warping. Cast iron is slow to heat and slow to cool...I could see it happening if it were a different alloy and maybe they do make rotors out of something else on smaller cars...
It would be interesting if that's true. Is there a website that confirms this? Do you have a link?


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I never read an article. I just turned rotors at a brake shop.
I understand that.

The point is that when the rotor isn't flat, it isn't because it is warped, but because there is a distribution of brake material that becomes embedded into the rotor that appears to make the rotor uneven.

It's a simple concept. I'm not sure why you feel threatened by this or that it somehow discounts your vast knowledge of working in a brake shop.
 

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Thats funny. Im not threatened, and I dont have a vast knowledge. Just some work experience with brakes. Enjoyed your info though.
 

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I'm just trying to learn from the smartest...I've worked in enough different fields to know that some have more experience and wisdom than others.

In the end, I'll get new rotors and pads, but now I know why mine were juddering and how to prevent it in the future...
 

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I have not had a lot of vehicles with a rotor judder from "warp" - well none really except when I got a used van and I replaced stuff so it fixed it. Supposedly from the brake mfg Raybestos, its likely from hub issue or torquing unevenly.

Raybestos Brake Tech School, Part One: Rotors Don't Warp | Hendon Publishing

My '10 tundra 4.6 (actually Dad's but we share as I don't need often neither does he) seems to have shake after you drive it a long time, like an hour. I was wondering if a caliper was sticking and heating up the rotor. From that info above I guess I need to measure with a runout gauge, lightly sand the surface to rough it up a little. Since its not bad, I can try this first before doing anything else.

FWIW, on my Honda van which had horrible brakes when I bought it, dusty, grinding, ineffective brakes with soft pedal, I replaced with Magnum performance brakes out of Canada drilled rotors, ceramic pads and stainless flex lines. The difference is amazing, its a high hard pedal, no dust, and linear brakes. I can "late brake" like a race car and have total control. Of course the 18" wheel upgrade helped the feeling as well. :)
 

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So, my Tundra needs front brakes again.
Third set, at 37K miles.
Tow very seldom, and then only a motorcycle trailer.
No city driving, don't ride the brakes.

It got two sets under warranty, and one set of rotors.
I put rear pads on it last summer, a few thousand miles ago.

Took it in for service a while back and they told me I'd need front brakes soon.
WTF

Didn't put front brakes on my Acura until about 70K, and rears at nearly 90K.
And I drive it like it was intended, as a sports car.
 

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The dealership said I needed new Caliper at 35000 miles and that I was just using rear brakes cause the outside of the Calipers had some surface rust. I bought a whole new system but just wondering if anyone had heard anything good about a PowerStop Caliper, Rotor, and pad upgrade?
 

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The dealership said I needed new Caliper at 35000 miles and that I was just using rear brakes cause the outside of the Calipers had some surface rust. I bought a whole new system but just wondering if anyone had heard anything good about a PowerStop Caliper, Rotor, and pad upgrade?
Powerstop is a pretty good name brand.
 
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I've had good luck with Akebono Ceramic Pads.
 
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