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Thanks!

when I put on new rotors, do you have any suggestions about brand(s) or whether or not to go with slotted, or cross-drilled rotors?
 

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I researched it cause I wasn't sure if my rotors were turn-able. Slotted Rotors are what you want and I hear the Hawk LTS pads with the Power Slot rotors. Price is reasonable around $400 I think. There is a vendor on here with some deals. I forget his name I will try to find it.
 

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I researched it cause I wasn't sure if my rotors were turn-able. Slotted Rotors are what you want and I hear the Hawk LTS pads with the Power Slot rotors. Price is reasonable around $400 I think. There is a vendor on here with some deals. I forget his name I will try to find it.
I was told by a Hawk tech guy that the LTS is best for Tundras unless you are doing super heavy towing.

He also said to not ever get drilled rotors as they crack and that slotted are a bit better than non-slotted, but eat pads a lot more quickly than regular rotors.

He did say the cryo treated ones are for real and it does make a difference.

I'm at 50K miles and generally pretty easy on the brakes except that I now live in a place where there are some steep hills with low speed limits. I developed the shimmy in the steering wheel and took the truck in to a local guy who specializes in brakes.

He said the front rotors are shot and that the backs need to be turned.

For new pads and rotors on the front and for new pads and turned rotors on the rear the quote came to $700. Ouch.

$290 of that is labor ($140 for the front install and $150 for the rear turn and install).

Does that sound right?

Material costs came out to $400, and that's with the Hawk pads, and rotors for $103 each, which sounds a bit high....

Any thoughts? Thanks...
 

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Do it yourself and shop around for the parts on line. It can be done with basic hand tools, a jack , and a jackstand. Hawk lts and Centric Power slot rotors are what I run and would not go with anything else. Those prices seem high to me. Make sure you bed the pads in per the proecdure on the Hawk box.

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Do it yourself and shop around for the parts on line. It can be done with basic hand tools, a jack , and a jackstand. Hawk lts and Centric Power slot rotors are what I run and would not go with anything else. Those prices seem high to me. Make sure you bed the pads in per the proecdure on the Hawk box.

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Thanks, it's Hawaii, so everything is a bit more expensive and part of the hassle is that there is no free shipping on rotors. I can find the Hawk LTS with free shipping through Amazon, but the rotors are a different story.

I've never done brakes myself and while it looks pretty easy, I'm not sure it's something I want to take a chance on screwing up.

The estimate for time was four hours, so I figure it would only take me six...:eek:
 

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4 hours seems like a bit much. I did mine in about 2.5 and I am not a pro.

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Yep, and if I have time to do it. I'd rather spend 6 hours of my time than pay someone else $100 an hour for their time.
I hear ya...I'm generally that way-more for the experience and learning how to do something vs the money savings- but on safety stuff like brakes, I'm not sure it's an area I want to learn and risk a mistake that could put others in jeopardy.
 

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4 hours seems like a bit much. I did mine in about 2.5 and I am not a pro.


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It seemed like a long time to me as well, but he's also turning the rear rotors so that's part of the time. It wouldn't surprise me if it's padded a little bit. People have to eat.

The good news is that I spoke with him today and asked him how much was left and how long I could drive it if I just avoid getting into the front "juddering" situation by using the tranny more to hold on the downhills, and he said I could probably go six months with what I've got left...So I certainly appreciate his honesty and feel I should reward it by giving him the business even if it costs me a couple of bucks more.
 

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Brakes are easy. My 06 dc has about 95,000 miles on it. I bought it with 84 on the clock. The brakes never felt right. Pedal feels spongy and goes down to far. Plus the pads throw off tons of dust. They need to be done as soon as I finish my lift install. I did the front brakes on my 04 ac with 50,000 on the clock right before I sold it. It was real easy. Had I known I was gonna sell it, I wouldnt have changed them and saved the money. I always buy the best pads available. Typically the first time I do brake job on a car that I onw, I just buy pads n rotors. Then I swap everything out, save the old rotors, then get them turned later and store them for the next brake job. Saves time waiting to get them turned later. This way I can do it all in under an hour, includeing bleeding the system.
 

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Brakes are very easy.
I had the rotors replaced on mine under warranty.

Dealer turned the rotors once, the shake came back.
Front rotors were replaced after that and it's been fine.

I will use Hawk when I replace these pads, I use EBC on my Acura and those are good too.
The EBC make a LOT of dust tho.
 

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I was told by a Hawk tech guy that the LTS is best for Tundras unless you are doing super heavy towing.

He also said to not ever get drilled rotors as they crack and that slotted are a bit better than non-slotted, but eat pads a lot more quickly than regular rotors.

He did say the cryo treated ones are for real and it does make a difference.

I'm at 50K miles and generally pretty easy on the brakes except that I now live in a place where there are some steep hills with low speed limits. I developed the shimmy in the steering wheel and took the truck in to a local guy who specializes in brakes.

He said the front rotors are shot and that the backs need to be turned.

For new pads and rotors on the front and for new pads and turned rotors on the rear the quote came to $700. Ouch.

$290 of that is labor ($140 for the front install and $150 for the rear turn and install).

Does that sound right?

Material costs came out to $400, and that's with the Hawk pads, and rotors for $103 each, which sounds a bit high....

Any thoughts? Thanks...
If he's got a lift in his garage then no F'en way is it four hours. The job is pretty easy. Just follow a DIY on here and look up youtube for any real problems. I did mine myself and paid $120 for 4 hawk brake pads and it cost me $15 to turn my rotors at O' Reillys. If there is an O' Reillys on the island they'll charge $15 a rotor. Or call some machine shops that have a lathe and ask them what the cost is to turn your rotors. So for me out the door was $180. The pain in the ass for me was that my truck is lifted and not having a mechanic shops hydraulic lift was a bit of a bitch and nerve racking using blocks of wood too get my truck high enough in the front to do it and in the back with the 35" tires. However, it still took maybe 2 hours worth of actual work. just make sure you have at least 2 clamps for the pistons in order to fit the new pads in. Plus the bonus of doing it yourself and what took me way longer is to paint your calipers with G2 caliper paint. Get it on ebay for 38 bucks, stuff works great and looks awesome!
 
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I usually only do one side at a time. That way I only need one clamp. Just remember to open the bleed valve on the caliper so the fluid comes out when the caliper is compressed. You dont want to push the dirty fluid back up into the abs valves. It will cause the abs valves to stick open and your light will come on. When both sides are done I then bleed the system, replenishing it with fresh fluid.
 

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I just hit 50k and my rear brakes are screeching(sounds like a wear indicator) but ONLY when I back up with foot off the break...haven't had a chance to pull the tires off yet but is that a typical sign when they are low? A buddy mentioned something about loose shims? IDK...



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Brakes are easy. My 06 dc has about 95,000 miles on it. I bought it with 84 on the clock. The brakes never felt right. Pedal feels spongy and goes down to far. Plus the pads throw off tons of dust. They need to be done as soon as I finish my lift install. I did the front brakes on my 04 ac with 50,000 on the clock right before I sold it. It was real easy. Had I known I was gonna sell it, I wouldnt have changed them and saved the money. I always buy the best pads available. Typically the first time I do brake job on a car that I onw, I just buy pads n rotors. Then I swap everything out, save the old rotors, then get them turned later and store them for the next brake job. Saves time waiting to get them turned later. This way I can do it all in under an hour, includeing bleeding the system.
This is because the brakes suck on that model. My 05 dc was awesome.......except the brakes. You can change the pads, fluid, and rotors .....wot make a bit of difference. Do the rear wheel disc conversion. It helps with your issue tremendously.
 
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Thanks...I'm seriously considering doing it myself...There's no time pressure now so if I can find some decent rotors, I'll get the pads and go from there....

Now that I know what the problem is and what causes it, it hasn't happened and since I've got another six months or so on them, I've got some time to sort things out...
 
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