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The new and exclusive Pathfinder All Terrain delivers dependable off-road grip and responsive on-road handling. The Pathfinder All Terrain features continuous center and shoulder ribs that deliver responsive highway handling, and the siped tread blocks provide reliable grip in all weather conditions. The rugged zigzag circumferential grooves rapidly expel water for dependable wet weather traction, and the angled edges add extra bite for off-road performance. The Pathfinder All Terrain is a budget-friendly all-terrain tire that delivers dependable performance, no matter where the road leads you.



Pathfinder All Terrain
UTQG: 500 A, B (SL sizes only)
Warranty: 55,000 Miles (SL sizes only)

Click here for: Pathfinder All Terrain Pricing and Availability


-KEY FEATURES-


  • Great off-road traction
  • Reliable handling
  • Quiet ride




-MEDIA-

 

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Where are these tires made? Who are they made by?
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
Where are these tires made? Who are they made by?
Thank you for your questions. The Pathfinder AT is made exclusively for Discount Tire by Hankook Tire. Unfortunately I do not have the information as to which of their manufacturing plants each specific tire comes from, but it is marked on the sidewall of each tire. They have manufacturing plants in Korea, China, Vietnam and the United States (Georgia).

The Pathfinder AT is a solid performing tire that has been well received by our customers.

Please let us know if you have any other questions.
 

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The Pathfinder AT is made exclusively for Discount Tire by Kumo Tire.
That tire sure looks like Hankook RF10 ATM, which is a good performer. Are you sure it's not made by Hankook? I know Discount's other Pathfinder tire (Sport SAT) is Kumho's KL51 tire.

Discount is my only source for tires now. Great bunch of guys at the store down the road from me.
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
That tire sure looks like Hankook RF10 ATM, which is a good performer. Are you sure it's not made by Hankook? I know Discount's other Pathfinder tire (Sport SAT) is Kumho's KL51 tire.

Discount is my only source for tires now. Great bunch of guys at the store down the road from me.
Thank you for your continued support of Discount Tire, nwtundra! Glad to hear our guys down the road are taking care of you as they should.

We did make a typo above... the Pathfinder All-Terrain is produced by Hankook while the Pathfinder Sport S-A/T is produced by Kumho. Nice catch, edit made!
 

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Wrong info again from a sponsor or manufacturer. Took a tt member to catch it. The other recent one I saw was from spyder headlights.


One another note I will check into these in about 25,000 miles.
 

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Wrong info again from a sponsor or manufacturer. Took a tt member to catch it. The other recent one I saw was from spyder headlights.


One another note I will check into these in about 25,000 miles.
We're human too, lol.

Let us know if you have any questions!
 

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Discussion Starter #9

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To Discount Tire and others that run the same tire (And in the same size), I recently purchased four Hankook Pathfinder AT 275/55/20 tires. I am running them at the recommended tire pressure of 30PSI cold on the front and 32PSI cold on the rear of my 2019 Tundra Crewmax Platinum 4x4. From the tire bulge, it looks as though the tires are suffering from low tire pressure. What tire pressure do you recommend these tires be run at, and if different from the door jam sticker, why? Also if dofferent, how did you reach the conclusing your pressures are correct?
 

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MichaelT-

Thank you for your inquire, and very valid questions. I will happily explain the reasons, however would like to preface this with an explanation. What I am about to explain is strictly from the stand point of safety, meaning the minimum PSI requirements of the tire to meet/exceed the vehicle manufactures original load requirements for the vehicle.

With the advancement of tire construction it is difficult to determine a tires true PSI by the way the sidewall bulges out. This method was popular with Bias ply tires because when the tire went low the sidewall would look squished. Today radial constructed tires can naturally have a squat to them and be correctly inflated.

Industry standard is to use load inflation tables along with the original equipment tires information, compared to the new tires information to calculate the correct cold PSI. We will PM you and happily help figure out your 2019 Tundra Crewmax PSI requirements with those new tires.(Nice truck by the way!)

The next part is to determine what gives the best ride for that tire and at what psi. We would never recommend going down in psi however if the tire looks squished or the ride quality is not ideal you can increase the pressure to find what feels best for you. (Up to the tires Maximum inflation, a Standard Load tire stops gaining load carrying capacity at 36PSI and a Extra Load at 42PSI) the only thing to watch is the tire wear. An over inflated tire will wear the center rib out extremely fast.

Tire inflation | Discount Tire

I hope this clears up some of the confusion with tire PSI, i know it can be a bit frustrating sometimes. Again this information is strictly to meet the vehicles minimum load carrying requirements set by the vehicle manufacturer. Beyond that is just personal preference.

Should you ever have any further questions please feel free to reach out to us. We are always happy to help!
 

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MichaelT-

Thank you for your inquire, and very valid questions. I will happily explain the reasons, however would like to preface this with an explanation. What I am about to explain is strictly from the stand point of safety, meaning the minimum PSI requirements of the tire to meet/exceed the vehicle manufactures original load requirements for the vehicle.

With the advancement of tire construction it is difficult to determine a tires true PSI by the way the sidewall bulges out. This method was popular with Bias ply tires because when the tire went low the sidewall would look squished. Today radial constructed tires can naturally have a squat to them and be correctly inflated.

Industry standard is to use load inflation tables along with the original equipment tires information, compared to the new tires information to calculate the correct cold PSI. We will PM you and happily help figure out your 2019 Tundra Crewmax PSI requirements with those new tires.(Nice truck by the way!)

The next part is to determine what gives the best ride for that tire and at what psi. We would never recommend going down in psi however if the tire looks squished or the ride quality is not ideal you can increase the pressure to find what feels best for you. (Up to the tires Maximum inflation, a Standard Load tire stops gaining load carrying capacity at 36PSI and a Extra Load at 42PSI) the only thing to watch is the tire wear. An over inflated tire will wear the center rib out extremely fast.

Tire inflation | Discount Tire

I hope this clears up some of the confusion with tire PSI, i know it can be a bit frustrating sometimes. Again this information is strictly to meet the vehicles minimum load carrying requirements set by the vehicle manufacturer. Beyond that is just personal preference.

Should you ever have any further questions please feel free to reach out to us. We are always happy to help!
Thank you for the PM, you may want to contact your store Mansfield, TX to explain to them that filling these tires to 40psi "Cause tires shrink in the cold, haha" isn't the greatest way to impress a customer.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
My pleasure,

Also thank you for sharing your experience, I will circle back with the store for the training opportunity because "Shrinks in the cold" certainly leaves more questions than answers.

The intent was likely based around all PSI is cold tire inflation. The theory is for every increase of 10 degrees will equate to an increase of 1PSI or vice versa. For example, the average passenger tire may run 100-120 Degrees hot, if the ambient temp is only 50 degrees outside, it leaves a potential for a 7 PSI drop once the tire cools down to the outside temperature. If the tire was inflated to 35 hot by the time it cools down it would be under inflated.

None the less "Tires shrink in cold" wasn't the right explanation. Hopefully this provides a bit more insight.

If there is anything further please feel free to reach back out, we are always happy to help.
 

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I am running the 295-70-18 pathfinder a/t's, a suprisingly good tire at a great price for the 295's!! I ran all 3 gens of the bfg a/t and a couple sets of michelin a/t. The pathfinder is right in the middle of both for noise, staying balanced, wear, traction etc. Not as aggressive as a bfg a/t but more aggressive than a micheling a/t. I will get another set for sure.
 

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Got the Pathfinder ATs for my Tacoma a few months ago. Very happy with the traction and noise level - comparable to my previous Michelin LTX. Too early to gauge tread life.
 
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