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I did an oil change on my 2013 Tundra earlier today and noticed while driving that there was a stutter when I accelerated, which it did not do prior. When I came home to trouble shoot the only thing I found was I forgot to put the metal insert inside of the oil filter.
My question is, do I need to get a new oil filter? Or am I ok just putting the insert inside of the filter I have already purchased and see if that fixes the issue? And what damage if any have I done to my truck? Sorry for the long post. Thank you for any help in advance.
 

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WHY the f did you remove the metal tube?
 

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Does your truck have the metal filter hosing or the OEM plastic? I wonder if someone didn't secure the tube with the tabs at the bottom. If I remember right, it should be fixed in place.

Maybe get the metal housing the next time you change if you don't have one. Plenty of info on here if you search for it. Venza metal housing.
 

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pics of filter or it didn't happen!
put new filter and drain oil.inspect for chips/damage.
if the oil light didn't come on you should be ok.
Well, this post wins the "Most Informative" of this thread. :yesnod:

YES, NEW FILTER...and oil too. Don't do anything more, nor anything less. If you've done damage, it is what it is. Maybe you'll dodge this bullet.

Except for the "acceleration" part, you would have been OK. Oil film is held in the bearings by surface tension, and that will save you for awhile even when there is no oil in the crankcase. I once changed oil in my Dudsmobile cutlass, and idled the engine for a while waiting for the idiot light to go out...the idiot finally caught on. I'm sure this happens no more than once a day at quick lube places. And, that's why this idiot changes his own oil. But better learn fast...the stakes are high. :)

P. S. The "stutter" you felt was probably the bearings receiving full oil pressure after having no oil pressure as the bypass valve around the collapsed filter opened and closed. You are probably are OK on this; good thing you checked it out quick.
 

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Didn't even know that metal tube could come out


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Oil filter bypass valve. Spin on oil filters have them built in, and (I suspect) that engines with a cartridge type filter (like our 5.7s) have them built into the engine design. Unfiltered oil flow is better than no oil flow would be the logic. There is a small mention of it in this comparison https://parts.olathetoyota.com/tundra-oil-filter-comparison
 

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Oil filter bypass valve. Spin on oil filters have them built in, and (I suspect) that engines with a cartridge type filter (like our 5.7s) have them built into the engine design. Unfiltered oil flow is better than no oil flow would be the logic. There is a small mention of it in this comparison https://parts.olathetoyota.com/tundra-oil-filter-comparison
Yep, exactly correct. I'm pretty sure all manufacturers design a bypass valve into the engine block oil passages to/from the oil filter. Automotive engines are designed to go into "survival mode" if the oil filter isn't passing enough pressure and volume: "unfiltered oil flow is better than no oil flow". If Austin1302 ever runs into a Toyota engineer, he should buy him a drink. :laugh:

Actually, the guy that wrote that filter comparison has it a little wrong; I don't believe spin-on filters were EVER designed with an actual bypass valve. Having a bypass valve designed into a spin-on filter would make them needlessly and prohibitively expensive. Automotive engine designers decided a long time ago to simply integrate that more expensive component into the engine block itself.

Oil filter bypass valves sense both upstream and downstream pressures, or differential pressure, across the oil filter. When the differential pressure reaches a certain value, probably just enough to maintain downstream oil pressure above the minimum required to prevent engine damage, a spring compresses allowing a disc or ball to unseat, and unfiltered oil flow to divert around the filter.

Spin-on filters do, in fact, have a little flapper disc directly below the small inlet holes around the perimeter of the filter. This is not a "bypass valve"...It is a backflow prevention valve to prevent oil from leaking from the filter back into the crankcase when the engine stops. This is only important when a spin-on filter is positioned at an angle such that oil can gravity flow back into the engine. It would be terrible design to have the filter lose it's fill on every shut down, just to have the bearings wait until the filter refilled before getting oil flow on startup. Since our Tundra engines have the filter mounted vertically and downward, oil is trapped in the filter housing when the engine stops (a messy draining proposition); our cartridge filters have no backflow prevention valve, nor is one required.
 
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Didn't even know that metal tube could come out
Yep... In fact, if you get the aluminum oil filter cover, the first thing you do is swap the short tube the comes with it with the longer tube that's in the plastic cover the next time you do an oil change. There are a couple of little metal tabs that you need to bend down to get the tube out and then bend back up to keep it in place.

Dave
 

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You're absolutely right, restosud: I stand corrected as a dumbass. I have extrapolated my experience with Chevy small blocks to foolishness regarding Toyotas. :eek:

I have a Toyota spin-on for my old 4Runner here, and there's definitely something that could be a bypass at the bottom of the center tube. My digital caliper shows there being about 0.300" between the bottom of the can and the filter element...that would be plenty of clearance for oil to flow under the filter element and pop up a bypass valve at the bottom of the center tube. I think I'm going to cut the old filter apart to prove this to myself after the next 4Runner oil change.

Furthermore, I just looked up the oil circuit on page 31 of the 1UR-FE.pdf someone posted here (same architecture?), and this document indicates no oil filter bypass valve is built into these engines, only a pressure relief valve on the oil pump that bypasses flow back to suction of the pump. An oil filter bypass valve is all you would have to protect the engine if the filter isn't flowing enough oil. :(

So, back to OP's thread, I'm not sure where the oil filter bypass valve is for our engines with cartridge filters, but there has to be one somewhere. Maybe that pesky drain valve at the bottom of the filter housing has more than one purpose.
 

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I know first hand that some canister type filters do actually have a bypass. Especially when used in hydraulic applications like say a 10 micron rating... Not sure the science behind them, don't really care.
 
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