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Discussion Starter #121
One thing he mentioned in the video is that Toyota just doesn't have the funds for extensive R&D for the Tundra, so they are using the Ecoboost and Ram suspension as their starting point, and trying to improve on them. He has sources at the factory say that they are tearing down and testing a bunch of Ecoboost engines, but I think the Ram suspension is just speculation, though sensible.

I'd guess a big v8 will still be there, but doubt it will be changed much if at all. The effort will be put into the turbo V6. The Tacoma engine isn't so much gutless as overgeared. Anyway, with the turbos it will be very different.

Surely a new transmission? Maybe not, as that would be another big project.

Says expect it to be unveiled in Feb as a 2021 model.
 

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One thing he mentioned in the video is that Toyota just doesn't have the funds for extensive R&D for the Tundra, so they are using the Ecoboost and Ram suspension as their starting point, and trying to improve on them. He has sources at the factory say that they are tearing down and testing a bunch of Ecoboost engines, but I think the Ram suspension is just speculation, though sensible.

I'd guess a big v8 will still be there, but doubt it will be changed much if at all. The effort will be put into the turbo V6. The Tacoma engine isn't so much gutless as overgeared. Anyway, with the turbos it will be very different.

Surely a new transmission? Maybe not, as that would be another big project.

Says expect it to be unveiled in Feb as a 2021 model.
I think one thing is maybe for sure this time around.

we may Get a actual 3 rd gen tundra.

what that is, who knows but we should know in feb here in Chicago

with all that suspension masking on the mule, I bet the suspension change is for real. Also, they have an 8 speed already for the land cruiser I think can drop right in, id be surprised if they stick with the 6 we have now
 

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Discussion Starter #123
8 speed would be cool, but I've never felt like my Tundra needed more gears. My wife's 2009 Forster with a 4spd auto on the other hand...
 

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We have the Toyota 8-speed tranny in our 2018 Lexus RX350, and I'm not overly impressed by it. Shift points seem odd, and under full throttle it shifts hard periodically. Lexus already has at least 2 TSBs regarding hesitation while cruising and the Lexus forums have many complaints about this hesitation issue. the TSBs are for re-flashing the engine and/or tranny computers. I haven't noticed the hesitation, so we may be lucky.

The 8-speed in the LC also seems to be problematic according to the LC forums. Let's hope that Toyota fixes all this if they put an 8-speed in the Tundra or the Tacoma.
 

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When does it become over kill ???
Only when some wizard finally determines how many speeds a transmission needs to have to be considered "perfect".

And of course by that I mean when said transmission delivers the absolute maximum gas mileage with being problematic.

Yeah, maybe never.....

:laugh:
 

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The Tundra engine produces 278 HP and 265 lb ft of torque and with 4.30 gears it has great power for its size. When I first got the truck with the V-6 engine I had to learn to slip the clutch or the rear wheels would spin and burn rubber. People thought I was showing off but it was the amount of torque, low gears, and light rear end of the pickup that I needed to compensate for with my clutch technique.

Adding more speeds to the transmission has improved miles per gallon by less than 1 mpg on average. It is making trucks lighter and more aerodynamic and developing smaller displacement engines with turbo assist that has improved fuel economy for modern trucks. The manufactureres care about the CAFE numbers and so a gain of 1/2 mpg is significant and they get to sell the new trucks for a lot more money so the customer foots the bill. Same will be true for diesel engines that cost twice as much to buy and twice as much to operate and maintain.
 

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The Tundra engine produces 278 HP and 265 lb ft of torque and with 4.30 gears it has great power for its size. When I first got the truck with the V-6 engine I had to learn to slip the clutch or the rear wheels would spin and burn rubber. People thought I was showing off but it was the amount of torque, low gears, and light rear end of the pickup that I needed to compensate for with my clutch technique.

Adding more speeds to the transmission has improved miles per gallon by less than 1 mpg on average. It is making trucks lighter and more aerodynamic and developing smaller displacement engines with turbo assist that has improved fuel economy for modern trucks. The manufactureres care about the CAFE numbers and so a gain of 1/2 mpg is significant and they get to sell the new trucks for a lot more money so the customer foots the bill. Same will be true for diesel engines that cost twice as much to buy and twice as much to operate and maintain.

What Tundra engine are you talking about? The 5.7 produces 381HP and 401ft lbs.
 

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A new Tundra in 2021 or 2022 would be about on par with the Nissan Frontier. 2005 technology in a 2019 model year. BUT at least the Tundra did undergo some cosmetic changes in 2014 to update it a little. You can tell the difference between a 2007-2013 Tundra to a 2014+ Tundra, whereas a Nissan frontier from the outside looks exactly the way it did in 2005. haha.
 

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We have the Toyota 8-speed tranny in our 2018 Lexus RX350, and I'm not overly impressed by it. Shift points seem odd, and under full throttle it shifts hard periodically. Lexus already has at least 2 TSBs regarding hesitation while cruising and the Lexus forums have many complaints about this hesitation issue. the TSBs are for re-flashing the engine and/or tranny computers. I haven't noticed the hesitation, so we may be lucky.

The 8-speed in the LC also seems to be problematic according to the LC forums. Let's hope that Toyota fixes all this if they put an 8-speed in the Tundra or the Tacoma.
I too have an Rx 350 with the 8-speed Aisin and after a TSB it is much better but still not fantastic. That said, it's a transverse-mounted unit that will have no relation to an 8-speed longitudinally mounted unit other than it will be designed by the same corporate philosophy that apparently accepted mediocrity with the 8-speed transverse unit. Fingers crossed....
 

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I hear Nissan's next gen 5.6 will have over 400hp and 400 pounds of torque. So it can be done. I don't see any reason why Toyota can't get us a 5.7 with 400 or 410 hp and 420-440 pounds of torque.

I am divided between another Tundra or the Silverado. It's a shame, if it wasn't getting another car paid off I'd seriously consider picking up a 2020 Tundra at a discount but I'm not quite in the market yet. I am probably going to wait until 2021 or 2022, compare the looks and reliability of the new Tundra technology to the track record of the new Silverado and make my decision then. My 09 Crewmax has been good to me so I'm inclined to consider another Toyota first. But at the same time I do not want to be a test mule for brand new technology.
 

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I hear Nissan's next gen 5.6 will have over 400hp and 400 pounds of torque. So it can be done. I don't see any reason why Toyota can't get us a 5.7 with 400 or 410 hp and 420-440 pounds of torque.

I am divided between another Tundra or the Silverado. It's a shame, if it wasn't getting another car paid off I'd seriously consider picking up a 2020 Tundra at a discount but I'm not quite in the market yet. I am probably going to wait until 2021 or 2022, compare the looks and reliability of the new Tundra technology to the track record of the new Silverado and make my decision then. My 09 Crewmax has been good to me so I'm inclined to consider another Toyota first. But at the same time I do not want to be a test mule for brand new technology.
This seems like the "safe bet" if you don't need or really want a truck immediately. Wait until the 2021's are announced, see what they have to offer and if it's questionable pickup a 2020 with the few new added bells and whistles at a discount. At least that's my plan!
 

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My Tundra's main purpose is for towing my RV trailer. As it stands now it falls in last behind the Big 3 in all categories of towing / hauling.

#1 They need to take the towing capacity from 10k to the 12k range.

#2 Even more important where 90% of people don't know, the current "hitch capacity" (The weight you "push down" on the hitch) is only 980 lbs. Where the big 3 are in the 1150 to 1300 lbs range.

#3 Payload is 200-600 lbs under everyone else.

#4 Just improving the transmission to an 8 speed maybe with two over-drives could gain a mile or two in MPG's. Something I notice on my Tundra when "coasting" I use the term "Free-wheel". I can pop the gear shift over and back when semi coasting and the RPM's will drop from say 1700 to 900. I can only assume running the engine at 900 RPM's saves fuel. Sometimes it does it by itself sometimes not.

With that said, I too will be watching with baited eyes what comes out of Toyota. In the last 4 months I have test drove a F-250. And last week just looked at a Chevy 2500....Can't get over how high the front nose sits. The 2500 double cabs don't come out for a few more months yet. So far the Tundra's doubles cabs offer the most room. I don't want to go to a crew or crewmax to get a 6.5' bed. I can't live with a 5.5' bed...

My 14' Tundra does what is asked of it towing a 7500-8000 lb RV, but I wouldn't go any larger. As a daily driver it has a nice ride especially with it's tight turning radius....Dependability is what one expects from Toyota.
 

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My Tundra's main purpose is for towing my RV trailer. As it stands now it falls in last behind the Big 3 in all categories of towing / hauling.

#1 They need to take the towing capacity from 10k to the 12k range.

#2 Even more important where 90% of people don't know, the current "hitch capacity" (The weight you "push down" on the hitch) is only 980 lbs. Where the big 3 are in the 1150 to 1300 lbs range.

#3 Payload is 200-600 lbs under everyone else.

#4 Just improving the transmission to an 8 speed maybe with two over-drives could gain a mile or two in MPG's. Something I notice on my Tundra when "coasting" I use the term "Free-wheel". I can pop the gear shift over and back when semi coasting and the RPM's will drop from say 1700 to 900. I can only assume running the engine at 900 RPM's saves fuel. Sometimes it does it by itself sometimes not.

With that said, I too will be watching with baited eyes what comes out of Toyota. In the last 4 months I have test drove a F-250. And last week just looked at a Chevy 2500....Can't get over how high the front nose sits. The 2500 double cabs don't come out for a few more months yet. So far the Tundra's doubles cabs offer the most room. I don't want to go to a crew or crewmax to get a 6.5' bed. I can't live with a 5.5' bed...

My 14' Tundra does what is asked of it towing a 7500-8000 lb RV, but I wouldn't go any larger. As a daily driver it has a nice ride especially with it's tight turning radius....Dependability is what one expects from Toyota.
There is no reason whatsoever to do any of this for a half ton truck.

The ratings that come from Toyota are conservative. The Tundra can do anything with their half ton that anyone else can do with their half ton and more. The "Big 3" have long lied about their specs.

The new 19 Ram is a sluggish piece of junk. The 5.3 in the Silverado is a joke. I was pulling my boat the other day and lined up with one at a stop light. I refused to let him over and he couldn't get around me. My father-in-law said that he would be ashamed to own a Silverado. Ford is really the only competitor with the Tundra and who wants to trust a twin turbo engine from Ford. They've proven they can't build a reliable turbo for years in their Diesel engines. Just look at the 6.0 and 6.4. The 6.7 is doing okay but you can about bank on one going out by 100,000 miles. They say they've got it up to 150,000 miles now but I don't believe them....

If you want to tow 10,000 plus, buy a RAM 2500 with a 6.2 or Diesel. Maybe try the new 250 with the 7.3 or a Chevy 2500 with a 6.2.
 

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There is no reason whatsoever to do any of this for a half ton truck.

The ratings that come from Toyota are conservative. The Tundra can do anything with their half ton that anyone else can do with their half ton and more. The "Big 3" have long lied about their specs.

The new 19 Ram is a sluggish piece of junk. The 5.3 in the Silverado is a joke. I was pulling my boat the other day and lined up with one at a stop light. I refused to let him over and he couldn't get around me. My father-in-law said that he would be ashamed to own a Silverado. Ford is really the only competitor with the Tundra and who wants to trust a twin turbo engine from Ford. They've proven they can't build a reliable turbo for years in their Diesel engines. Just look at the 6.0 and 6.4. The 6.7 is doing okay but you can about bank on one going out by 100,000 miles. They say they've got it up to 150,000 miles now but I don't believe them....

If you want to tow 10,000 plus, buy a RAM 2500 with a 6.2 or Diesel. Maybe try the new 250 with the 7.3 or a Chevy 2500 with a 6.2.
Yes, I have heard the "issues" with the 19' / 20' Rams. I do like their styling, but what is behind it is %bg#$jnk70?uy. The new 2500 Chevy's now use the 6.6L gas, but I can't get over the what I call the Bull-dozer looking front end. First looks are God awful ugly. And if you don't get the top of the line model with the Chevy emblem, the lower models have the Big Chevrolet emblem across the front grill, even uglier.... A few weeks back I took a pic of my 14' Tundra and the 2020 2500 Chevy. As far as the twin-turbo stuff from Ford, I see it as too much happening to produce the power to tow. Then they have a 2.7L diesel....now too.

According to the towing standard (J-2807) which Toyota was the first to go by, I have to go by that. I have seen people tow 10,11 12 even 13k lb. RV trailers...with a Tundra. But the rear suspension (present Tundra) is the limiting deficiency in towing. I had to add a set of Firestone air bags to my Tundra. My present RV is as big (29') as I'll ever go. But it is a heavy 29' trailer for it's length. 6600 dry, and between 7800-8000 wet (loaded). Especially with its a little windy I'll get pushed around a little...
 

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Yes, I have heard the "issues" with the 19' / 20' Rams. I do like their styling, but what is behind it is %bg#$jnk70?uy. The new 2500 Chevy's now use the 6.6L gas, but I can't get over the what I call the Bull-dozer looking front end. First looks are God awful ugly. And if you don't get the top of the line model with the Chevy emblem, the lower models have the Big Chevrolet emblem across the front grill, even uglier.... A few weeks back I took a pic of my 14' Tundra and the 2020 2500 Chevy. As far as the twin-turbo stuff from Ford, I see it as too much happening to produce the power to tow. Then they have a 2.7L diesel....now too.

According to the towing standard (J-2807) which Toyota was the first to go by, I have to go by that. I have seen people tow 10,11 12 even 13k lb. RV trailers...with a Tundra. But the rear suspension (present Tundra) is the limiting deficiency in towing. I had to add a set of Firestone air bags to my Tundra. My present RV is as big (29') as I'll ever go. But it is a heavy 29' trailer for it's length. 6600 dry, and between 7800-8000 wet (loaded). Especially with its a little windy I'll get pushed around a little...
I forgot Chevy went to the 6.6. If I really had to choose I think I'd go with the F250 or F350 with the new 7.3.

I have a 14 too with the air bags and sway bar. I love mine but all of the half tons really need help in the back.
 

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I forgot Chevy went to the 6.6. If I really had to choose I think I'd go with the F250 or F350 with the new 7.3.

I have a 14 too with the air bags and sway bar. I love mine but all of the half tons really need help in the back.
When I purchased my new RV, I knew it was quite a bit heavier than my last RV trailer. So I went hunting for that Max hitch weight number. Finally my local Toyota GM gave me a printout, and when he said 980 lbs. I was like it can't be that low. My 2005 4Runner (4.7 v-8) was 720 lbs. without a weight distribution hitch and 1120 lbs.with a DW hitch. So I said is there another number with a using WD hitch. Nope, just 980. So when I bought the trailer 2300 miles away, I didn't yet have the bags. The rear sagged a good 3". With the bags and 40 PSI I sag maybe 1/4" - 1/2" max.

I was also waiting on Fords new gas 7.3. My buddy has a fairly new F-250 with the 6.2 gas, pulling the same brand of trailer, just a little smaller. He says he is getting about 7.5 MPG, where I average 9.5...I reset my MPG each day of a trip. My trailer is tall 11'6" where my last two RV trailers were 9'6" and 10'. I do have the 8 year bumper-2-bumper Toyota warranty on my Tundra, so I do not want to go past 100k or 8 years. That takes me to Jan. 2022. I'll just make it on mileage, depending if we go back up to Alaska again.
 

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I tow 10,000 pounds with my Tundra. It performs great. Just got back from a 1300 mile trip. Truck is awesome. I do have timbrens.
That being said even the 1 ton guys add Timbrens or airbags to haul there tt's or 5th wheels. Its all over the camping forums. This isn't a 1/2 ton thing.
 

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I tow 10,000 pounds with my Tundra. It performs great. Just got back from a 1300 mile trip. Truck is awesome. I do have timbrens.
That being said even the 1 ton guys add Timbrens or airbags to haul there tt's or 5th wheels. Its all over the camping forums. This isn't a 1/2 ton thing.
Yes, I have seen that on RV'ing forums too. But I also see it where ( on the RV forum's ) unless your pulling any size RV with a 3/4 or 1 ton diesel you get bashed. ( " You don't have enough truck, You'll get sued if you cause an accident, your brakes are not for towing"...... ) I have even been told the Tundra is only good for 5k...at most.

So that is why over the next year, I want to see where the next generation of Tundra goes. Does Toyota see the big 3 all engaging in a "arm's race" of sorts as far as towing capacity, to say "It can tow 35k, 36k....." And then Toyota says, we're going to design more of a vehicle that is "eye candy" as a daily drive because what ever we do, we will never win the towing competition race, even in the 1/2 ton market....This would differentiate themselves from the pack. What percentage of the truck buying public buy a truck to haul or tow? My guess would be 20%, the others as eye candy, grocery get'er.
 

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It has changed radically over the years and now most people get trucks with crew cabs to replace a minivan for the family and pet. All the lifted trucks are worthless for off road use and worthless for towing and worthless for hauling.

For trail running a Tacoma is hard to beat and a number of them have made it over the Rubicon trail in one piece. For light towing a 1/2 ton pickup or SUV is OK to use. It is when the tow load exceeds 10,000 lbs that a 3/4 ton truck with its stronger framer and brakes and cooling system and transmission is needed. My 2500 diesel when towing 12,000 lbs up a 8% grade at 8,000 feet with an outside air temp over 100 degrees runs with no problems and ATF and coolant temps are within norms. But now that I now longer tow anything heavier than 800 lbs it is no needed and the diesel engine costs twice as much to operated and maintain and it is not nearly as reliable as any vehicle with a gas engine.

Problem for me with the GM trucks is their dinky gas tanks and one can no longer buy a larger aftermarket gas tank. The Ram is available with a large gas tank and they have the option for an electronic locking differential. With Toyota no longer providing limited slip differentials but instead a modified ABS braking that is like the "traction control" with 2WD cars it utility in 2WD is poor and I would be in 4WD far more often than would be the case with a true LSD in the rear. Toyota also has not upgraded the crash protection in the Tundra since 2007 and this is also a very real concern.
 
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