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You won't be disappointed with Collinite 845. I'm a huge fan of the Jescar Powerlock as well. Great sealant.

If it didn't feel slippery, it might be your soap. What are you using for that?

Blue correl or any big gallon size jug of suds specifically for cars ,,, but No wax added.

However I ALWAYS pressure wash ( at a safe distance , water only ) to get the grit off in hopes of less scratching when hand washing with a big ole sponge. I may go to hell for using a sponge , I know sorry .
Would this regular pressure washing have an effect on my wax job durability ? It might I dunno.

Thanks for any tips or pointers
24hrsparkey
 

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Wax is 1985. You want a good synthetic product.

Follow around @Jumbo Jet the guy is a detailing genius.

Here's one with steps taken on a neglected finish. You could follow this but skip the correction steps. You'll find a bunch of his threads very helpful.
http://www.tundratalk.net/forums/show-shine/637786-quick-wash-turned-into-major-paint-correction.html

These guys have great product.
https://www.chemicalguys.com/
Haha, aw man, you guys are way too kind. Greatly appreciate the nice words.
 

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Blue correl or any big gallon size jug of suds specifically for cars ,,, but No wax added.

However I ALWAYS pressure wash ( at a safe distance , water only ) to get the grit off in hopes of less scratching when hand washing with a big ole sponge. I may go to hell for using a sponge , I know sorry .
Would this regular pressure washing have an effect on my wax job durability ? It might I dunno.

Thanks for any tips or pointers
24hrsparkey
If you're looking to just buy from AutoZone/Walmart, one of the best over the counter washes I've found is Meguiars Gold Class shampoo. Thick suds, slick finish and works well in the foam cannon.

You're pressure washer will not affect the durability of your wax. Especially if you're keeping a safe distance. I pressure wash with a Kranzle 1622 every wash, and I can consistently get 3-4 months beading from my sealants. Washing with a harsh soap will quickly wear down your wax, so be sure to use a ph balanced, quality shampoo.

You won't go to hell for using a sponge, but have fun in purgatory.😊🔥 Swing by AutoZone and pick up a microfiber wash mitt. Personally, I use the Über lambs wool wash mitt.

Hope that helps. Mark
 

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For the most part most wax (no matter what the bottle or advertising says) won't last much beyond 2-3 months. It simply doesn't have the chemical properties to do so.

Synthetic sealants are going to give you 6-10 months of protection/coverage. I've gotten 12 months before by doing multiple layers of sealants such as Adams Super Sealant or Optima Paint Plus Pro.

Ceramic Sealants are out now that can give you 12 months + protection.

If your truck is outside 365 spend the money have go with a long lasting ceramic sealant.
 

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Cool, thanks for the video link!

I am already invested in the Ryobi 18V cordless power tool line. They make a couple of orbital sanders / buffers:

6-inch:
https://www.homedepot.com/p/Ryobi-18-Volt-ONE-6-in-Buffer-Tool-Only-P430G/205509661

10-inch:
https://www.homedepot.com/p/Ryobi-18-Volt-ONE-10-in-Orbital-Buffer-Tool-Only-P435/205975768

Will either of these be suitable for waxing my Tundra surfaces and windshield?
My opinion is that both of those are cheap toys for the "clueless" DIY market. They'll probably be used once with OK results, and thrown on a shelf until some future garage sale. Once the pad that comes with gets worn out, what do you do then? You may even need more than one pad to finish.

Why not spend three times that much and get yourself a "fool-proof" professional grade polisher that will allow you to use a wide range of universal, easily-changed (hook and loop), professional-grade foam pads that can be matched to the task at hand; i.e. heavy cutting (yellow), light-medium cutting (orange), polishing (white), finessing (black), wax/sealant application (red), wherever you are on the correction spectrum. If you start with paint in almost new condition, you'll probably never need a pad more aggressive than orange or white. Learn how to use the tool, and you will get superior results.

https://www.amazon.com/PORTER-CABLE-7424XP-6-Inch-Variable-Speed-Polisher/dp/B002654I46

Discard the "free" polishing pad that comes with. Use the polisher with a 6.5" velcro backing pad (purchased separately); you may also want to install an optional counterweight to allow you to use 6.5" pads; makes the work go faster.

These are my favorite foam pads, color coded as above:
https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_ss_i_4_12?url=search-alias=aps&field-keywords=lake+country+pads+6.5&sprefix=Lake+country,aps,198&crid=WWSV29MMA8VZ&rh=i:aps,k:lake+country+pads+6.5
 

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Will either of these be suitable for waxing my Tundra surfaces and windshield?
My opinion is that both of those are cheap toys for the "clueless" DIY market.
What OldGuy said. I've had them in the past and they sat on a shelf until I tossed them in the trash can.



If you're wanting to stay on a tight budget, get the Harbor Freight DA polisher. Get a coupon and you can pick it up for about $60 or less. Re-grease the gears with better grease, flip the switch plate so it sits on the top, pick up a decent backing plate, and get some of the Lake Country pads OldGuy recommended. There are plenty of YouTube video's on how to regrease and flip the switch (neither is difficult) to help you out.

I have now used it to polish our Tundra and it actually works really good. Probably not as smooth as the professional tools but it has more than enough power to get the job done. It also doesn't hit the pocketbook as hard as the PC or Griot's (and much less than the Rupes or Torq).

--Matt
 

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To add to what these guys are recommending, I'd suggest taking a look at the Griots Garage 6" DA Polisher. Its one of the best DA's on the market. But instead of buying a 6.5" backing plate, buy the 5.5" backing plate and use the slightly smaller 5.5" pads. The Porter Cable doesn't have enough torque to properly spin the larger pads, and works so much more efficently with the 5.5" backing plate and pads. The Griots will spin the larger pads, but the 6.5" pads are a little too large in the tighter areas. You will notice little difference in time savings using the 6.5" pads over the 5.5" pads. You'll be able to whip that thing around all over the truck with the smaller pads. I haven't put my 6.5" polishing pads on in years. I only use my red 6.5" pads for applying sealants.

Griots has a HD version that has a 25' cord. Its pretty sweet not having to pull out the extension cord every time.

Hope that helps,

Mark
 

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@OldGuy43:

Thanks for the sage advice. After reading up on this topic some more, I am inclined to go with the Porter Cable.

I am completely new to this; I wonder if you can recommend pads and polish that would work well for:

The Tundra windshield. For some reason, my windshield picks up some very persistent grime.
The Tundra body.
An RV with a painted aluminum corrugated siding.

Thanks so much in advance!
 

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@OldGuy43:

Thanks for the sage advice. After reading up on this topic some more, I am inclined to go with the Porter Cable.

I am completely new to this; I wonder if you can recommend pads and polish that would work well for:

The Tundra windshield. For some reason, my windshield picks up some very persistent grime.
The Tundra body.
An RV with a painted aluminum corrugated siding.

Thanks so much in advance!
Any random orbital polisher is most valuable as a correction tool; i.e. bringing the shine of the painted surface to perfection.

Depending on condition, e.g. oxidation, correction may require use of rubbing compound with Lake Country CCS foam pads (see link in my earlier post), either yellow (heavy cutting) or orange (medium-light cutting). If the paint is not oxidized (e.g. relatively new vehicle), it may still be desirable to polish out swirl marks or fine scratches caused by improper washing technique using a Lake Country CCS white pad with a fine polish or polishing glaze.

Once the shine meets your goal, protection is the next step. In the case of a new truck, no correction at all may be required, and you can go directly to protection products. You can use a polisher with a Lake Country CCS red foam pad to apply wax or sealant, but the Zaino sealant products that I use for protection only recommend hand application.

The only product recommendations that will start more "pi$$ing contests" than motor oil would be...paint care products, i.e. polishes, waxes and sealants. Everybody has their favorites, and you will get more recommendations.

As I said, I use Zaino products, hand applied, for protection. If I have to correct severe oxidation, or polish out finish sanding (new paint with orange peel), I use 3M rubbing compound followed by 3M foam polishing pad glaze simply because I have found they work well.

I have also used old school Meguiars products for a long time (Mirror Glaze line), and those will be a safe choice for a beginner. If the paint is in good condition, I would probably use their M83 Dual Action Cleaner Polish or their M205 Ultra Finishing Polish (slightly less aggressive). If the paint is in GREAT shape, I would probably use their M3 Machine Glaze or M7 Show Car Glaze.

@Jumbo Jet will be a good resource for recommendations. He is correct that the Griot random orbital polisher is a more powerful polisher than the PC7424XP. The Griot GG6 has an 850 watt @ 7 amp motor where the PC7424XP has a 500 watt @ 4.5 amp motor. The GG6 does cost about 20+% more. My PC is probably 15 years old, and if I were looking today, I would take a look at the Griot.

My PC has served me well, and will be adequate for most DIY polishing. I used mine to polish out the paint on the same vehicle twice...first as finished-sanded fresh paint with orange peel, and 14 years later as finish-sanded, severely oxidized paint. (Good protection is absolutely required with the new paint formulas; no Zaino on this one.) A professional would have used a rotary buffer for these jobs, but I don't trust myself with a rotary buffer. I really could have used the extra power of the GG6 both times to polish out 1500 grit scratches, but the PC7424 got the job done. Having mastered that challenge, it will manage whatever future chores I have for it until one of us passes on. ;)
 

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Adding to what OldGuy recommended, you can use a light polish on your windshield and side glass with good results. Einszettes/Nextzetts makes a great glass polish, simply called Glass Polish. You can use a white pad with machine on 3-4, one to two passes and wipe clean.

For paint, it's very tough to beat any Menzerna products. FG400 will cut through most any defects you'll ever need to remove. SF4000 is an incredible jeweling polish, extremely easy to work and even easier to remove. The two make for an amazing combo.

For aluminum, I love Aero Metal Polish or Boms Away Metal Polish. Aero became my new favorite a few years back.

Machines are going to be just as subjective as waxes and motor oils. I have most of the standard machines.....PC, Griots 6", Griots 3", Flex 3401, Rupes Bigfoot 15. The machine I take out of the drawer most often is my Griots 6". It's lightweight, powerful and smooth. I run it with a 5" backing plate and use 5.5" pads. My PC just takes up space in the drawer, I haven't used it in years. I think my wife used it to sand the paint off an old dresser about 4 years ago, lol.
 
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