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I have a 2014 Crewmax and was told I am going to need new brakes after my most recent state inspection. He also mentioned I'd need new calipers when the brakes are done. I've have shops replace the brakes in the past but I'm thinking I just might tackle the job myself this time. Should I just go with OEM brakes brakes or is there another brand or upgrade that is a forum favorite?
 

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You’ll pay a little more, but make sure you buy your parts from a reputable auto parts place. Stay away from Amazon and RockAuto. There are A LOT of counterfeit parts out there. It’s not a hard job and there are a lot of good videos on YouTube. Sometimes the hardest part is trying to get the rotors off. Make sure you have a C-Clamp or caliper tool to push the caliper pistons back in while keeping an eye on the master cylinder to make sure it doesn’t overflow.
 

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I have a 2014 Crewmax and was told I am going to need new brakes after my most recent state inspection. He also mentioned I'd need new calipers when the brakes are done. I've have shops replace the brakes in the past but I'm thinking I just might tackle the job myself this time. Should I just go with OEM brakes brakes or is there another brand or upgrade that is a forum favorite?
Why do you need to replace the calipers? Are they leaking? Usually, these last the life of the vehicle. Do you mean rotors?
I have been very satisfied buying the better or "best" pads and rotors from a reputable auto parts store. Replacing rotors and pads is a lot easier than working on drum brakes. I agree you need to find a good You Tube video on how to do it. Check 2 or 3 videos, if you can.
If you are having trouble with pulsing of the brakes occasionally, you might look at drilled rotors. They cost more, buy can solve the pulsing problem, since they don't warp as easily as standard rotors.
 

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Just buy the factory pads. They are really superior and don't cost a heck of a lot more if you buy them from a discount Toyota Dealer.
As to the calipers, if the pistons slide back in fine, I would not replace them. I have a 2013 Rock Warrior and did mine last year with no problems (New England roads - salt & 105K miles)
Do one side at a time and pump the brakes up after you have done that one side. You really should not have a problem with the master cylinder (brake fluid) overflowing...
 

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Just buy the factory pads. They are really superior and don't cost a heck of a lot more if you buy them from a discount Toyota Dealer.
As to the calipers, if the pistons slide back in fine, I would not replace them. I have a 2013 Rock Warrior and did mine last year with no problems (New England roads - salt & 105K miles)
Do one side at a time and pump the brakes up after you have done that one side. You really should not have a problem with the master cylinder (brake fluid) overflowing...
I initially swapped out stock with TRD pads years ago and they didn't do much better, at least for me anyways. In spite of all the Tundras highpoints, the brakes seemed to have always been an issue as they are undersized. What finally made my Tundra stop like I felt it should was swapping out to SS braided lines, cryo slotted rotors, and Hawk pads. A lot of guys have their magic combination and I'm guessing some are better and some are worse than how my setup performs. I was comfortable with the research I did and would do it all over again after a year later since I changed to this setup.
 

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I have used Toyota OEM Pads, and Wagner Thermoquiet Pads, and the O-Reiley house brand BrakeBest, and I honestly cannot tell the difference. I also swapped the Rotors out for the BrakeBest brand a few months ago, and again, I can't tell any difference. They all have been nice and smooth, good grip, no noise, no dust, etc.

I would not swap the OEM calipers out. Instead, have Toyota (or your mechanic) do a clean and lubricate service. I have never replaced the calipers on my Tundra's, but I had an issue last summer with a soft brake pedal that was very difficult to diagnosis and did not act like any brake issue I have ever had. It felt like air in the lines, but that should not have been possible because the level was never low and the system had never been opened, and the pads were in good condition. After replacing the fluid (by bleeding out the old and adding new as it was pumped through the system), I still had the soft pedal issue.

Long story short, the Tundra caliper is a 4 piston caliper and there are an extra set of sliding pins that can get corroded and prevent the calipers from moving properly. In most caliper designs, the sign of the slide pins corroding is that the brakes stick on and you end up with one pad that is worn down to nothing and you have to replace the calipers to fix it. But with the Tundra calipers, when these pins get corroded, they stop the movement of the caliper inward so instead of the brakes getting stuck on, they get stuck pulled away from the rotor and thus the extra pedal travel and soft pedal feel.

I doubt you need new calipers but definitely have the dealer or mechanic do the clean and grease service to all the caliper pins when they put the new pads on. I had newer pads already, so I just had the Toyota brake service done to all 4 calipers and it was about $130 so it was very affordable and it fully restored my brake function.
 
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