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70K on the truck 4x4 crewmax 17 tundra. About to go to my third set of tires. Figured the suspension could use some TLC
I was going to get the OME Suspension system and go for the 2" Coach Builder Shackles. Ill be running stock 17" wheels with a 275/70R18 (MAYBE a 305/70R18 but not likely)
Trying to get a slight rake. I figured 2.5 in the front with an inch higher in the back. And the pics Ive seen the stock tire size looks great, I may consider

I tow a 8,000 pound tractor about 400 miles a year and a 24' trailer a handful of times a year. I live on a dirt road that likes to cycle the suspension its not horrible but its not smooth either.

This truck lives mainly on the highway and jobsites less my one mile offroad driveway

Do I need Upper Control Arms? Thoughts Feelings? Here is my 3rd gen 4runner for credibility. It gets the fancy stuff.
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My opinion would be to not bother with new UCA’s. These trucks don’t need them for 2” of lift and usually not even for 3”; they were designed for mid-travels setups and it was discovered that they worked as a nice bandaid to correct alignment for those seeking to eek out the last few fractions of an inch after between a 3” level kit and a 4” bracket lift. The part itself is usually (marginally) stronger than than the factory part but requires more maintenance as most don’t use the factory ball joint. For what you use your truck for, the factory parts are more than sufficient.

I don’t have any experience with the OME suspension and haven’t ever been in a rig that has an OME suspension but from my understanding, they are good quality setups that ride a little rough unloaded on pavement. This IMO, is due in part to the heavier spring rate (700 lbs/in IIRC) vs the stock 650 AND the fact that with ANY 3” coilover lift you are going to lose suspension down travel as the A arms are limited in their travel range. New coil overs are the best way to go as you can get an inch - maybe two - more downtravel than the factory coil over, but you are still losing the 3” that you lifted the vehicle.

Why is downtravel important? It’s what keeps your tires stuck to the ground. When driving over bumpy roads or off-road, up travel absorbs big bumps and hits without damaging parts by bottoming out shocks or spring And smashing hard parts in to other hard parts. Down travel, on the other hand, keeps the truck planted and handles the rebound from every bump - big or small. Say you have a 3” level kit and only have 1.5” of downtravel left in your suspension. As your travel down a washboard road, your tire dips in to a hole, then slams into the edge of the the rut causing the front end of the truck to move up by 2”. This doesn’t sound like a big movement cuz, well, it isn’t. But since you only have 1.5” of down travel, that tires leaves terra firma and you have a completely cycled out suspension that now needs to absorb the entire weight of that corner of the vehicle dropping from a height of 1/2”. But since this is a washboard road, that happens again and again and again, pogo sticking the front tire down the road as it loses traction over and over. This transfers a lot of chatter to the passenger compartment and in turn, to you.

Compare that to the stock suspension which has abt 4.5” of uptravel and the same amount of down travel. In this case, your tires would remain firmly planted on the road instead of bouncing down the road, proving a smother, more controlled ride. So your stock suspension could handle suspension movement nearly 3 times as large as a leveled truck without lifting a tire!! This also translates to on road behavior and driver comfort as well. Track cars r set up with loads of downtravel and less uptravel in order to maintain traction to the road as much as possible. Ride comfort obviously sucks in a track car, though because you want flat as possible cornering.

This is why I chose to go with Bilstein 6112’s on the lowest setting. Giant shock body for better control and less fade, softer coil, slightly more uptravel, and zero loss of down travel with a slightly more aggressive stance at less than 2” of lift and a rake retained. For me, it is perfect. I can tow and haul all day, drive around unloaded with a better ride, and flog it on dirt roads while maintaining control and comfort. If you look in to the way the trd pro is setup, they follow this same design philosophy and make basically the same choices.

Just my three cents.
 
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