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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Well, I had someone mention that they would appreciate a DIY on a front spring/rear flip kit install so I decided to do it with the least number of amenities possible. I have an air compressor and air tools at home, but many of you don't, so I didn't use them.

First, gather some tools.
You'll need:
2 floor jacks, but you could do it with just one and a set of stands.
1/2" drive deep well and shallow sockets in either metric OR standard.
1/2" drive ratchet and breaker bar
19mm OR 3/4" long combination wrench.
1/2 inch wrench.
3/8 drive 10mm, 12mm, 17mm and 1/2" socket.
11/16 or 17mm long combination wrench.
A pair of pliers. I used extra long needle nose.
A hacksaw. (I nearly broke down and used the die grinder with a cutoff wheel)

Then begin to disassemble your shiny new truck...
Set the parking brake and chock the rear wheels. Break loose the lug nuts.


Raise the truck (I did one side at a time) and support the front crossmember with a jack stand.


Remove the wheel.

Locate and remove the 2 brackets holding the ABS wire to the spindle and upper control arm with a 10mm socket.


Remove the 4 nuts holding the upper strut mount to the frame bracket using a 14mm or 9/16" socket.


Remove the keeper from the upper ball joint. Loosen the nut, but do not remove it yet.


Tap the spindle with a hammer until the ball joint tapered stud releases from the spindle. After the stud releases, raise the spindle with a jack to remove pressure, and remove the castle nut from the ball joint. You can pry the upper control arm down to make it easier.


Once the ball joint is separated, use a bungee cord to keep the spindle from falling outward and hyperextending the brake hose.


Remove the nut from the lower strut retaining bolt located on the back side of the lower control arm.


Remove the sway bar end link retaining bolt. Remember, the jack is still under the lower control arm. This removes pressure from the end link bolt.


Lower the jack holding the lower control arm and spindle up, then remove the lower strut retaining bolt.


Pry down on the lower control arm and slip the top end of the strut free from the frame bracket and upper control arm.


You can remove the nut holding the strut assembly together before taking it completely out, or remove the entire assembly and take it to a shop so they can swap springs for you. For safety sake, I recommend the latter. I have had these apart before and there is very little pressure on the nut at full strut extension. If you decide to disassemble the strut, you do so at your own risk. Remove the upper strut mount.


Remove the stock spring.


Install the replacement spring. The nut will go right back on, because the new springs are shorter than the originals.


Be aware that there is a specific orientation regarding the upper strut mount. Toyota was kind enough to mark it with an arrow and the word "OUT" to make this easy.

Reassembly is basically the reverse of the disassembly process. **EDIT**There is one other thing I forgot to mention. When reinstalling the lower strut bolt and the sway bar end link bolt, DO NOT tighten them without loading the spring. You need to be sure the weight of the truck is on the lower control arm when these 2 bolts are tightened. If not, the bushing will twist when weight is put back on the suspension and they will fail prematurely. (they certainly don't need any help in that department) If anyone has any questions, feel free to post them and I'll try to answer before I start posting the rear flip kit install procedure.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
rear flip kit

Ok, time for the rear flip kit install procedure.

Chock the front wheels.
Loosen the lug nuts.
Lift the rear of one side of the truck by the frame and add a jack stand for safety.
Lift the axle with jack #2 and remove the wheel.
Now you can see how small a space I was working in.


Remove the "U" bolts holding the axle to the spring and the lower shock retaining bolt.


Lower the jack that supports the axle to relieve pressure from the spring pack and remove the front spring eye bushing bolt.


Remove the nuts from the rear shackle. Lower the spare tire and remove the original shackle.


The spring will rest on top of the axle. Remove the spring from the truck. Do not turn it around. You can mark it so that the front spring eye goes back to the front frame bracket.
Unbolt the clip for the brake line and remove the plastic clip for the ABS wire from the bracket that is welded to the original spring perch, then cut this bracket from the perch. Be careful not to cut or chafe the ABS wire.


Install the new rear shackle by the top bolt. You may torque it at this time. If you have exhaust that exits behind the rear tire, wrestle the rear of the spring over the exhaust. I supported it with a jack stand. Raise the rear axle with the jack and install the front eye of the spring into the front frame bracket and install the bolt, but do not tighten it. Install the rear spring eye into the new shackle and install the bolt, but do not tighten it.
Lay out your new brackets and "U" bolts and orient them to the axle. Somehow I missed getting pics of this, but it is fairly straight forward. The hole for the spring pack bolt is offset and you will need to determine which end is front and which is rear. When installed, it should offset the axle to the rear about a half inch. (not forward)
Install the new perch, "U" bolts and lower plate. Tighten these fasteners. Raise the axle to load the spring and tighten the front and rear spring eye bolts. (if you don't do it this way, the bushings will twist when you put weight on the springs and lead to premature failure) I just realized that I left that info out of the front spring install...time to edit.
Reinstall the brake line and ABS clips to the new bracket. Install the bottom shock retaining bolt.
Check to be sure all fasteners are tight.


Repeat on the other side and secure the spare tire.
I started at 11:00 am and was done with both front and rear before 5:00pm. I stopped for lunch around 1:30. That was 30 mins or so.
This kit could easily be installed in your driveway or garage by the average guy with minimal hand tools.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Before and After

I hope this encourages people to take on this project at home. There is a sense of accomplishment and a feeling of pride that goes with the fact that you did it yourself. The best part of a project is being part of it.
Before...


After...
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I was surprised to find absolutely no paperwork whatsoever included with the kit. The only thing that I did not do was reverse the spring pack bolt. The hole in the new spring perch was big enough to accomodate the nut.
Yes, an alignment is necessary. Mine isn't too far off. Just a little negative camber and it looks like it is toed out slightly. I'm driving it to work tomorrow to do the alignment. Luckily I have not switched rims yet. Our heads only fit up to 18" internal mount.
It's also a good idea to recheck the torque on all the fasteners after driving it for a few days.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Another note...
I installed the rear spring eye in the lower shackle (4") position resulting in a higher ride height. Placing it in the higher (5") position would have definitely made the rear lower than the front. One of the magazine reviews I read mentioned that they wish they had installed theirs in the 4" drop position rather than the 5" drop position to begin with.

A little update...
Factory shocks still have 4" of travel before bottoming out when the rear shackle is installed in the 4" drop position. The axle would contact the frame (or at least the snubbers) before they fully compressed and bottomed out.

The mysterious thump from the bed area has disappeared.

I have read that the driveshaft will contact the bed crossmember beam on RCSBs and will need to be "trimmed" to accomodate the driveshaft if you lower your RCSB.

I grew tired of my mud flaps scraping the ground every single time we pulled into our driveway so...




I still occasionally use it as a truck, so...
The air shocks are installed and fit nicely considering the fact that I ordered them for a 1957 Chevrolet. :D
The upper mounts require the use of the spacer washer from the originals to fit into the frame bracket correctly. The lower mount required a collar from a different set of shocks (we had several laying around the shop from previous shock installs) that fits into the rubber bushing and gives the bolt something to clamp down on rather than smashing the bejesus out of the bushings.
The result is an independently adjustable rear ride height and increased load carrying capacity in a lowered truck without spending $250 on air bags. I'll post in the bed bounce thread if it helps get rid of my resonant bounce on concrete highways.

**EDIT** Bed bounce is nearly imperceptible after installing the air shocks and inflating them to 70psi! **EDIT**
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
A couple notes to add...
I installed the Corsa Sport and the right rear spring interferes with the tailpipe. I placed a jack between the spring and the frame, pushed the spring down, lowered the spare, removed the lower spring/shackle bolt and reinstalled it in the 5" drop position. The truck now sits level in the rear and the exhaust clears the spring. I'm a happy camper.
 

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So if I understand you right Phil the only thing replaced on the front was the springs??

Did you put new bump stops on the front also??

See mine they are a low profile type.

 

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Discussion Starter · #9 · (Edited)
Nope. I have clean spots on the control arms, so they do rub occasionally. I don't feel it bottom out, so I don't think they hit very hard or very often. The snubbers aren't deformed from excessive contact, either.
Have yours ever hit?
 

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Nope I've never bottom out with mine and the bump stops still look new.

I had the SOS lowering kit on my X-Runner and it always bottom out on the double railroad tracks on Caroline Forest blvd so I tried the Tundra on them and she didn't bottom out. So far My Tundra hasn't bottom out on any road surface. So in my opinion the full TRD kit is worth every penny. ;)

btw my mud flaps don't drag on the ground.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
:lmao:
The only time my flaps really hit was pulling in my own driveway. I have a pretty good grade on my driveway and a little dip at the curb. I think my back end might sit just a bit lower than yours...just going by the pic in your sig. If my shocks are aired down, they still rub occasionally.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Looks good I'm trying to decide what I want to do with mine if I should lower it and if so how much and what kit. Any suggestions?
What cab/bed combo do you have? Check out the pics in the "lowered tundra owner's group" thread to see how some of the setups look.
 

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Might just need this thread in the future if i can add the Spindle kit to my Tundra Racing drop kit!!
 
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What was your camber set to when you got it aligned? I lowered my Tundra 2" with springs and the most they could get was -1.0 degree at best.

Your truck looks sweet.
 

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I wish I could remember. I looked for the sheet but its not in my records. I use the Toyota dealer in Peoria IL to align my truck. I am pretty sure my guy said he had to leave the Caster out of whack a bit to get the camber to be within spec. My tires are wearing fine with the TR 2.5 drop and 2 inch drop spindles combined in the front. Although my rims are making contact with the lower control arm.... :/
 

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I wish I could remember. I looked for the sheet but its not in my records. I use the Toyota dealer in Peoria IL to align my truck. I am pretty sure my guy said he had to leave the Caster out of whack a bit to get the camber to be within spec. My tires are wearing fine with the TR 2.5 drop and 2 inch drop spindles combined in the front. Although my rims are making contact with the lower control arm.... :/
Thanks I will see where my truck is but Camber ended up at -1.2 and -1.0.
 

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Thanks for this write up got me through my Install today bought the kit used from a buddy of mine and I had put one on before but with this it was alot easier thanks:D
 
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