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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Anyways, I just got done installing my 2 post vehicle lift. 9k Atlas 2 post unit. This has no trouble taking the truck up off the ground.

My question is, seeing how I am a "skilled DIY'er", and this is my first lift, does anyone who wrenches for a living think this is the proper loading of the truck?

I'm not afraid to admit, but this is as high as I've lifted the truck. The truck and lift seemed quite sturdy, but again, I'm not a pro who does this day in day out. All I know is I have wanted my own hoist since I was a kid and I finaly got one, but I'm a bit apprihensive to be quite honest.

Any feedback will be greatly appreciated.

Later

KO
 

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I know NOTHING about vehicle lifts so I can't offer u any advice, sorry. This is my buddies and it handled my truck no problem. I can shoot him a text tomorrow and ask the spec's on it if it'll help u...
 
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Damn those pic's look similar huh? Just realized that...
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Damn those pic's look similar huh? Just realized that...
That was my first impression too. Looks like we positioned the trucks in similar locations tho.

Thanks

KO
 
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Yep, that is correct! The only thing I would advise, depending on how much weight is in the bed, is to maybe have a rear brace when working on the lift. Position it on the hitch as a 5th point of contact and you will have no trouble at all!

Congrats on the lift, I'm still working on a bigger garage!
 
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As long as the load is balanced on the lift you'll be fine.




Except, I've seen way to many homeowners who build a shop or garage big enough to work on their toys and then decide to buy a lift. The problem that arises is the concrete, you know that hard grey stuff that you drilled into to anchor that pretty new lift, may not be thick enough or the location of the posts may not have enough compaction effort under the concrete to support the same load, over and over without causing problems.

Such as sinking or cracking.

My good buddy who's a lifelong mechanic bought a foreclosed body shop about 5 years ago. In the one building had been a lift, or frame machine, so the floor had been reinforced to handle the load. When he installed a four post drive on in the second building he drilled the 4" of concrete and set solid Hilti anchors. About 3 months later he had a loaded oil field truck on the rack overnight and noticed the next day that the concrete around the back 2 posts was cracked. Finished the job on the truck and got it off. We rigged a reverse system to used the lift to lift itself off of the floor so we could saw cut a 2' by 2' area at each post so we could remove the concrete and soil and place reinforced concrete on a compacted soil. Almost 4 years later and you can't see any cracking or movement.

Just keep an eye on the floor, unless you planned ahead and built it to support a a lift.
 

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I install lifts for a living throughout the whole state of Florida mostly for Tire Kingdom. The type of arms you have on your lift determine how you should lift it. If they are symmetrical you will position the post roughly right at the door pillar. If you have an asymmetrical lift then the center of gravity will be moved back and the post will be closer to the center of the front door. The best thing to do is to set the arms and raise the lift until the tires are a couple inches off the ground and then go to the rear of the truck and shake it by the bumper. If it falls you want it to fall from inches and not feet. Also if you have the type of arms with a high and low step that flips up, you want them facing opposite directions. The rubber pad type doesn't matter. If you are removing heavy components from the vehicle then you should use support stands underneath the truck as well. You'll be fine if you're just doing oil changes and rotations. And also make sure you always use the locks while you're working. Leaving the lift up while working on it will cause premature wear on components and also put you more at risk. And on most lifts the minimum concrete depth is 5". And torque your anchors to the required specs. If your concrete is any less then your best bet is to cut out and pour a new footer that is keyed under the original slab like the previous poster stated. Any questions feel free to ask me. Enjoy your new lift!
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Ogtoy and CorySweatt:

Thanks for the feedback. I'm suprised at the responses already. Thanks.

Built the shop in 2010 with the intent to have a lift. Concrete is 5" in the entire area of the lift post. I wasn't sure were the lift would be positioned so I had to make the whole bay 5.5". My concrete guy told me he did an extra good job compacting the area (he is a friend and want to use the lift on occasion). The floor has pex tubes in the floor to run hot water for building heat.

The lift is described as a super symetrical, whater the hell that means. All I care about is lifting the truck at the balance point, or close to it.

The lift is not going to be used for an auto buisiness, just tire rotes, brake jobs, etc. It will most likely get the most use for my side job building and repairing trailers. I'm so tired of wiring trailers laying on the floor.

Again, thanks to all who gave the time to help me.

Later

KO
 
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