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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I just purchased a trial set of high quality LED low beam bulbs. They are like Xenon HID's but more reliable. Also you don't need to worry about them not firing up when you start them. They offer an increase in light output; stock bulbs are 1500 lumens, and these are 1800 lumens. I didn't expect much of an increase in brightness, but these are much brighter. They also give off light at 6,000 Kelvin (this is closer to daylight so your eyes pick things up better that light as opposed to the yellow light of a halogen bulb). This kit uses small ballasts and CREE LED chips. CREE is a manufacturer headquartered in Durham, NC, and is widely considered to have the highest quality LED chips. Here are some pics of stock vs. LED.

These pics show the difference in light output, but the white balance was definitely off. See the pictures of the light against the wall in my garage for the light color.




Please don't mind my dirty garage, these were quick iPhone pics, but it's a good pic of the stock vs. LED against a wall:



Here's what the conversion kit looks like:




Here is a picture of the kit with a stock bulb by it for size comparison:



A picture of the bulb:



A picture with the CREE LED chip:



Here's one of the cooling fan, these bulbs were pretty neat:



I have had HID's in past vehicles, HID's in bi-xenon projectors as well. I have personally converted headlights and done the projector retrofits in different vehicles in the past. I feel the bi-xenon projector was the best vision for where the light was projected, however above the cutoff line the visibility was poor. These LEDs offer a perfect balance of a lumen output upgrade, with the perfect light color, while not being overbearing to oncoming traffic like my HID's glared. They also make the truck look classier at night.

I ordered them as a test product for the store. I think I am going to start carrying them as long as these last me, I plan on giving them a hard test. Let me know if any of you have had experience with the LED conversion before. I can get these at a great price, so its feasible.


P.S. I know I don't have a Tundra, but I work at a Buick Dealership and these trucks were cheap. I know you are a good group of guys that appreciate some tasteful upgrades so I thought I would share. Plus, we use the same headlight size, so you all can benefit. :beerchug:
 

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Interested to see the pattern and what it looks like from about 40 yards out.
From the garage picture it doesn't look to have a pattern. Just flood.
 

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Looks like a more-refined version of the V-LED's V3 Triton. I like it!

Judging by the tiny 40mm fan bolted to the heatsink, I'm guessing heat may be an issue ;)

EDIT: These (or a derivative of those in the OP) are in the Alibaba catalog: http://www.alibaba.com/product-gs/924660597/50W_3600_Lumen_LED_Headlight_Next.html

(so in other words, we can expect a few companies to start selling these ... most likely for a lot more than it costs to buy wholesale)
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Price after shipping is looking to be around $129. The link above is a different company than the one I used. There would be a 1 year warranty. They have been looking great and I already got some compliments. The fan on these is well out of the elements on my truck, so it doesn't concern me (if I had them wet I would have bigger problems). The beam pattern was more even than the stock lights from what I saw on my test drive last night. To me these are the next step after xenon.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I would lose money at that price. The shipping to get them here is very high. Not to mention with me offering a warranty I am responsible for additional shipping costs associated with them. As you can see the kit I was looking at is also higher quality and will last longer as these have heat sinks and cooling fans as well for better longevity. The cheapest I have found them from a US company is $159 on eBay. Once I get a negotiated final price from my supplier I will be calculating my price, and if I can save people $30, offer a warranty with my shipping costs for that, I believe there is some value there for my customers.
 

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How do these achieve 1,800 lumens at 6000K? I'm confused. HIDs at 6000K are about 2,800 lumens, 5000K are about 3,000 lumens and 4300K is about 3,200 lumens. That's the reason why all of these new vehicle manufacturers use 4300K HID bulbs--they produce the best light.

I'm not giving you a hard time, I'm just curious about the new LED technology being harnessed for headlight purposes. My understanding is that the new BMWs, Mercedes, & Audis use these LED bulbs on their (high end) cars and they are EXPENSIVE!!! In fact, the Mercedes have one central LED by the glove box that powers every light in the car. Fiber optic cables simply transfer the light to each area it is used. Pretty amazing if you ask me.

Is the technology really there yet for the aftermarket community though??

Craig


Sent from AutoGuide.com App
 

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HIDs at 6000K are about 2,800 lumens, 5000K are about 3,000 lumens and 4300K is about 3,200 lumens. That's the reason why all of these new vehicle manufacturers use 4300K HID bulbs--they produce the best light.
The brightest light on a meter is not necessarily the best light for the human eye. Remember that the eye evolved with the sun as the primary light source. The noon sun is 5600K. Early morning/late evening sun is 4300K.

To measure light in lumens, you need a large and expensive instrument called an "integrating sphere". They cost approximately $20,000.00. Do you really think some shop in China selling HIDs or LEDs as cheap s they do are really testing the lights with a $20K light meter? They are just approximating the output and selling them. Higher numbers means more buyers. There are cheaper tools to measure the light. But it's not standardized where to measure the light without an integrating sphere. You take a cheap meter and measure at whatever distance you want. Of course, the closer you are to the light source, the higher the measurement will be. If you are selling a light bulb, you measure as close to the bulb as you can and don't tell the buyer where/how you measured it.

Also be aware that high intensity gas discharge lamps can not be accurately measured with a Kelvin scale since they only give off a small fraction of the light spectrum. They are actually measured by Correlated Color Temperature (CCT) and approximated to a Kelvin equivalent.
 

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Exactly!
Aquarium lighting is the same way. Manufacturers just make up the numbers by eye balling it. Bulbs are sold in 10k, 14k, & 20k cause thats what customers want. You can take five 10k bulbs and all of them are different colors.

Lumens alone doesn't mean much. The lamp could light a 3ft area brightly or a 15ft area dimly and have the same lumen output.
 

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Subbed to see how these lights pan out, very intrested in how much light is visible in not totally dark situations b/c it seems like leds really work as the darker it is the more light you can see.
 
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