Toyota Tundra Discussion Forum banner

1 - 18 of 18 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hello everyone, I just purchased a 2011 tundra double cab 4wd with the 5.7 engine. I have an issue with the brake system I wanted to throw out there. When braking from 60mph down to 5mph the truck brakes smoothly, pedal feels good (not smooshy and no pulsation noted). From 5-10mph up until the stop is where the issue starts. I swear it feels like the calipers are biting then releasing then biting then releasing as it is not a smooth stop. It does not feel like when antilock brakes kick in with my old vehicles where it’s a dadadadada kind of thing. From the outside, the brake pads look like they still have some meat on them and the shop down in Jacksonville that did a pre-inspection on the truck said that brakes were good (you know how that goes)I have only had the truck for a week and love it otherwise. Any help or guidance would be appreciated and maybe this is “normal” for these vehicles??
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
I wondered a little about that. Is that normal on these trucks to feel that or is that an indication of trouble yet to come with the transmission as it definitely feels like a “warped” rotor only under 5-10mph though? Transmission seems to shift through all the gears smoothly and I can not feel any slipping. Could it be something like a solenoid starting to go in the transmission or line pressure that needs to be adjusted?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
I have the exact same truck and had the exact same problem. Took it to the dealer a couple of weeks ago and they said it was the rear brakes. They turned the rotors and put on new pads. Smooth as glass now. Still get that little bump though when the transmission downshifts.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Just to make sure, get up to speed then just bump the tranny into neutral and slow to a stop like you did before. If it doesn't do it then, it's the transmission.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
125 Posts
I have a 2011 DC and have not noticed that problem with mine... you didn't list your miles on the vehicle. I would consider "Occam's Razor" principle: The solution that requires the smallest number of assumptions is usually correct. ... the more assumptions you have to make, the more unlikely an explanation! I would start with BierMe's thoughts first. Check the runout and condition of your rear rotors first... report back when solved. P.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
36 Posts
When you turn the 4x4 on do Tundras shut -off the anti-lock brake system??? IDK
The reason I ask is because you could use that to trouble shoot the ABS...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
I will start with the rear brakes. All 4 brakes were done 10000 miles ago (truck has 140,000 miles on it). The brakes were done at a Sears in Florida I believe a year ago. God only knows if the guy from Sears knew what he was doing. If they turned the rotors then, what is the chance there is enough material to do it again? Any shops (Advanced auto, Oreilleys, etc) better at turning rotors then another? Had a local shop that specializes in Toyota’s point me to the rear brakes as well, but could not get me in for almost 2 weeks. They said if I needed rear rotors that they had them in stock (Toyota oem) and said they file something off of them so they don’t make noise when you turn and somehow they rub if you don’t file a portion of the rotor down????? Not sure what that is all about. Price was $110 a piece.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
119 Posts
I think maybe your rotors are just barely warped and with a high speed stop like that, you are generating a lot of heat, and as the rotors get hot, they are warping a little bit and you feel it towards the end of the stop but not at the beginning. The Tundras are known to have the rear rotors warp whereas most other vehicles will tend to have the front rotors warp. You can tell front from back by if the steering wheel shakes, it is the front, and if the seats tend to shake, its the rear. They say you can sometimes be able to feel the pulsing in the brake pedal if the rotors are warped, but I have never been able to feel that.

It sounds like they turned them during the last brake job and that thins the rotors a little bit and makes them more susceptible to warping. It also depends on how fast you do these high speed stops. The faster the stop, the more heat you generate.

One thing you can do to prevent rotor warp is when you do a high speed stop, at the end of the stop, don't really stop. What warps them is when they are hot, and you stop, the brake pads hold the heat in the rotor where they are touching, but the rest of the rotor is cooling, and as the temperature changes, the rotor is bent by the force of the uneven temperature. To prevent this, stop a little short and just barely let the truck roll while you let the rotors cool evenly.

I started stopping like this about 15 years ago and have not warped a rotor since. It really works.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
36 Posts
I had Toyota rotors turned by TOYOTA (under warranty) and they were still warped when they were done and progressively got worse. I talked to my mechanic buddy and he said not to buy any Toyota brake pads or rotors, so I replace the front with Powerstop matched set. I did it my self watching a Youtube video, no more brake problems. I got mine on rockauto.com.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
119 Posts
I have also noticed that the Tundra's can be sensitive to wheel nut torque causing brake pulsing. I have had several instances where I rotated the tires and had a brake pulse right afterwards. I find that if I am extremely careful torquing the wheel nuts, even to the point of having to torque them a couple times, I can get the brake pulsing to go away. This is always on the front wheels. I have noticed this on my 07, 11, and 12 Tundra's but have not had this with my 15 CM.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
36 Posts
I have also noticed that the Tundra's can be sensitive to wheel nut torque causing brake pulsing. I have had several instances where I rotated the tires and had a brake pulse right afterwards. I find that if I am extremely careful torquing the wheel nuts, even to the point of having to torque them a couple times, I can get the brake pulsing to go away. This is always on the front wheels. I have noticed this on my 07, 11, and 12 Tundra's but have not had this with my 15 CM.
With the original brake rotors or aftermarket?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
119 Posts
They were original rotors. I have never had to replace the rotors on any of my Tundra's (mainly due the non-stop technique I have been using). The first Tundra I had (an 07 DC) had the rear rotors turned because I let the brake pad go metal to metal, but that is the only rotor work I have had to do. The technique really works!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
778 Posts
I have the exact same truck and had the exact same problem. Took it to the dealer a couple of weeks ago and they said it was the rear brakes. They turned the rotors and put on new pads. Smooth as glass now. Still get that little bump though when the transmission downshifts.
Exactly . The trans downshifts are a very slight bump. Due to the steep . 5. something rear gearing .
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #18
Just ordered 2 Toyota oem rotors from Lewis Toyota out of Topeka, Kansas ($87 a piece) and I am going to try the trd pads. If or when I need to change the front I may go fancier with the power slot Cryo rotors, but figured these gave 147,000 miles to the truck and best I can tell they may have been turned once at 90,000 miles. What sears did 1 year ago, who knows - May have turned them again which could be the reason for my issues.
 
1 - 18 of 18 Posts
Top