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So I noticed some serious play in my drivers side Outer Tie Rod end, and some good squeaking coming from the Inner Tie Rod..I have read that the Inner is a B$%^h to get out due to an uncommon bolt size. Anyone have experience with this? Recommendations? Really don't want to pay someone for this..Appreciate it in advance!
 

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So I noticed some serious play in my drivers side Outer Tie Rod end, and some good squeaking coming from the Inner Tie Rod..I have read that the Inner is a B$%^h to get out due to an uncommon bolt size. Anyone have experience with this? Recommendations? Really don't want to pay someone for this..Appreciate it in advance!
Most of the time, tie rod end replacement would be a two-wrench job IMO: "Requires some mechanical skill."

The fact that you're asking says that you've never done any steering linkage work. It's not hard, it's not complicated, but improper steering linkage repair will make your truck a danger to yourself and everyone on the road. I recommend you watch all the Tundra tie rod end replacement videos you can find on youTube, to see if you understand what those guys are doing, and if they're doing things that exceed your skill set.

You don't say how many miles; old school Toyota tie-rod ends were sealed and would last 100Ks of miles in daily service. Premature wear should be considered, and lifted MAY require additional skills I don't know about. But, if you've gotten advice that says the inner is "hard to get out due to an uncommon bolt size", then, it sounds like your advisors could be single-wrench skill players with only one or two wrenches. You will not be able to do this without a reasonably complete tool set, and an understanding of the pullers, wedges, or other tools you will need to borrow from your auto supply store (see the videos).

Another consideration for you is that you MUST get a front end alignment after new tie rod ends are replaced, and alignment is not something you can do yourself. To do this repair yourself, you MUST be able to install the tie rod ends close enough to final settings, with thread travel approximately equalized on all ends, to safely drive the truck to an alignment shop. If the problem with ends on one side seems to be due to normal wear (doubtful), then you should consider having the other side inspected as well, and maybe replacing all ends at once to avoid several realignments to get this right.

And, then there is that whole keeping the steering wheel centered when the wheels are straight ahead thing. Your alignment shop can probably insure that comes out all right for you, but if they have to go back and re-adjust ALL the ends to get enough thread length for the alignment, then it may cost you more money.
 

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If it's anything like a Gen1 which I did last summer, you won't be able to rent a tool that fits the inner tie rod to unscrew it off and will have to resort to a pipe wrench.

My advice is to watch the videos online as someone has suggested, read the repair manual and have the inner tie rods on hand, just in case.

I changed mine out at 210K miles along with the bad outer tie rods and they had no in/out movement, just some loose horizontal/vertical play (wouldn't stay in place - still okay).
 

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Thanks for the detailed info.. I have actually done my fair share of front end work/ lift installs, etc.. BUT, many people say the inner tie rod nut is an odd size (confirmed by Jack above) and most kits do not have the right socket size. And yes both sides will be done at the same time, I have a 7 inch lift with 90k miles so this type of wear is normal. Will be done this weekend, I'll update after.
 

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Sounds like most of my detailed information was misdirected...your experience sounds good. Your description of the inner tie rod end having an "uncommon bolt size" gave me the wrong impression.

Toyota likely has an SST (special service tool) specifically for the purpose of removing the inner tie rod end(s) Their SSTs are typically expensive, and often you can work around using other similar tools. Jack's suggestion of a pipe wrench immediately explained your problem for me. It is a good idea...every guy's tool box needs at least one pipe wrench.

I wouldn't use one on any new part or fastener I planned to reinstall on the truck; the jaws tend to cut up the part surface pretty well.
 

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Toyota likely has an SST (special service tool) specifically for the purpose of removing the inner tie rod end(s) Their SSTs are typically expensive, and often you can work around using other similar tools. Jack's suggestion of a pipe wrench immediately explained your problem for me. It is a good idea...every guy's tool box needs at least one pipe wrench.
Truthfully, I'm surprised nobody has found or created another tool to replace the SST other than using a typical pipe wrench. Maybe because it's not done that often. It really just requires a large but super skinny adjustable wrench.
 
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Jack, what do you estimate the dimension across "flats" for the tie-rod end?

I have a 12" crescent wrench with maximum jaw width of 1 5/16"+; that might get the deed done as well.

Edit: No...jaw width on a 12" crescent wrench is inadequate for removing the inner tie rod end. You'll need a specialized tool, pipe wrench, or larger crescent wrench to remove the inner tie rod end.
 

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Ha, that’s actually the video I first saw that tool in :) wasn’t sure if the 2ns gen Tundra’s were the same size or not though...
The inner tie rod end isn't the same part number from 2003 Sequoia/Tunda to 2nd Gen 2007-2013 Tundra, but Toyota doesn't change basic stuff like tie rods ends materially from one gen to the next.

My opinion: It's a generic tool that handles a huge range of inner tie rod applications (not all), and receives rave reviews by all purchasers...I think you'll be OK. BUT, if it doesn't work out, then it's Prime...if it doesn't fit, Amazon will take it back, and send UPS to pick it up on their dime. What's not to like?...except for the price? ;)
 

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The inner tie rod end isn't the same part number from 2003 Sequoia/Tunda to 2nd Gen 2007-2013 Tundra, but Toyota doesn't change basic stuff like tie rods ends materially from one gen to the next.

My opinion: It's a generic tool that handles a huge range of inner tie rod applications (not all), and receives rave reviews by all purchasers...I think you'll be OK. BUT, if it doesn't work out, then it's Prime...if it doesn't fit, Amazon will take it back, and send UPS to pick it up on their dime. What's not to like?...except for the price? ;)
Awesome, thanks for the info. and very true, easy return with Prime. yes I do wish it was a little cheaper but if it works that well, it's worth it to me.
 

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Jack, what do you estimate the dimension across "flats" for the tie-rod end?

I have a 12" crescent wrench with maximum jaw width of 1 5/16"+; that might get the deed done as well.

Edit: No...jaw width on a 12" crescent wrench is inadequate for removing the inner tie rod end. You'll need a specialized tool, pipe wrench, or larger crescent wrench to remove the inner tie rod end.
A pipe wrench to grab the 'ball' portion of the inner tie rod with the teeth and a thin adjustable wrench (not crescent) to hold the steering rack from twisting by grabbing the flat end of the steering rack.
 

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Jack, what do you estimate the dimension across "flats" for the tie-rod end?

I have a 12" crescent wrench with maximum jaw width of 1 5/16"+; that might get the deed done as well.

Edit: No...jaw width on a 12" crescent wrench is inadequate for removing the inner tie rod end. You'll need a specialized tool, pipe wrench, or larger crescent wrench to remove the inner tie rod end.
My 2013 measures 48mm or 1 7/8".
 
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