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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok here is my situation, I have a 29 ft Avenger made by Prime time and we have had several problems from the dealer (Dixie RV if any one is familiar) and they have completely pissed me and my wife off and have essentially damaged my 6 month old camper. To make a long story short they damaged my floor and patched it with out ever telling us and they denied ever doing it. We have now talked to higher management and they are supposed to make it right but they have done nothing but give us the run around.

My wife and I have found a Sprindale 282bhhs that we absolutely love and it has all of the bells and whistles that the Avenger does not have. The Springdale will fit our family much more than the Avenger and we feel like we will be able to grow into this camper and keep it for many years where as the Avenger we feel like we will have to trade up anyway in a few years and it is depreciating rapidly. The dealership that we are looking at offered within 1500 of payoff on the Avenger which is better than other dealerships have offered so the extra financing want be to bad. The Avenger weighs 5600lbs at 29 ft dry and the Springdale weighs 7000 lbs at 32ft dry so the weight is heavier for the Springdale but is is more solid.

My dilemma is should I keep the cheaper screwed up Avenger and hope that dixie rv does right by me or should I wash my hands completely and go with the heavier, more expensive but better suited for my family Springdale?

Another question I have is, will the extra weight kill my gas mileage? right now I am getting between 8-11 depending on the conditions and Im guessing the extra weight wont hurt to bad right? I also have to keep in mind that when I will be pulling it I will have two dirtbikes, a generator, gas cans, ramps, etc and Im sure my 5.7 4x4 Tundra will handle all of this with the added weight of the Springdale right?

Thanks guys for any advice on the matter!
 

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I have no knowledge about RV's... but from what you stated, it seems as if you are planning on upgrading anyways, why not just go with it and wash you hands of the Avenger.
Certainly the added weight and size of the new Springdale will affect MPG, but the extra bells & whistles will be worth the few $ it costs you to tow it.

Good luck with it!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks dragos!
 

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Actually i'd do the new one if it fits the family better. MPG actually will still be in the 8 to 11 range. I traded for a lighter camper (roughly 1k lighter) and my MPG stayed basically the same. Most your towing MPG is from the resistance from pulling through the air anyways.

My old camper weighed 7000 dry, new one is 6000 dry. MPG is within .5
 

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Having been in a similar situation with both a conversion van and a Coleman popup - take the hit and get out of the camper you are unhappy with. Even if they fix it perfect you are always going to have that bad taste in your mouth and it will impact your desire to use the camper.

The flooring in a camper is usually laid before the cabinets and all are installed (at least in everyone I have ever been in - they are never going to get this right.
 

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I know the owners and some people who worked there. Shady operation, I would never do business with them. I would get out from under the Avenger and go check out Berrytown down the road.
 

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If you can do it go for it. Went camping over the weekend and my toy hauler weighed right in at 7000 loaded. I got about 8 mpg running 60-65 with a little cross wind and a couple long not very steep hills and a couple steep grades. I couldn't be happier. The 5.7 pulls amazing. Very easy towing truck doesn't have to work very hard.


Sent from AutoGuide.com Free App
 

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My truck seems to get better than some on here. I usually get 10 to 10.5 towing anymore running 70 and pulling some hills. That's hand calculated. I also have 33's and a 3/1. I pull about 7K loaded right now.
 

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Like stroked stated, you likely will not see hardly any drop in MPG from the heavier camper because the resistance of the camper is likely more of a burden on your MPG already than the actual weight is.
 

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wash your hands clean and get the better camper. If you are financially sound, pull the trigger. As stated earlier...if it's something to do with the floor they will never make it right. Basically whole thing would have to be disassembled, laminate pulled up, fixed. Then put back down. They may fix that problem and cause another one putting it back together....

Sounds like you have a WDH and Brake Controller so it shouldnt have any extra costs on the backend
 

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Go with the new one!
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thanks guys for the advice! I pulled the trigger and I pick it up Friday =)
 
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The difference in mpg will be minimal and the least of your worries. I'd be more concerned with your payload and axle rating. A 7000lbs "dry" trailer will be closer to 7400+ once you've added options and things not included in dry weight like propane tanks and batteries. A small family will easily add 1000lbs of clothes, food and gear. Before you know it you're 8500lbs plus. Well within the Tundras tow rating but.....the tongue weight will easily exceed 1000lbs. With the tongue weight and a small family you will be pushing the payload rating already. On top of that you want to put 2 dirt bikes, a generator, gas, and ramps? Yikes.

You may want to take a trip to the scales and check your weights.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
The difference in mpg will be minimal and the least of your worries. I'd be more concerned with your payload and axle rating. A 7000lbs "dry" trailer will be closer to 7400+ once you've added options and things not included in dry weight like propane tanks and batteries. A small family will easily add 1000lbs of clothes, food and gear. Before you know it you're 8500lbs plus. Well within the Tundras tow rating but.....the tongue weight will easily exceed 1000lbs. With the tongue weight and a small family you will be pushing the payload rating already. On top of that you want to put 2 dirt bikes, a generator, gas, and ramps? Yikes.

You may want to take a trip to the scales and check your weights.
Will it really be that close to 10000 lbs and exceeding my tow limits?
 

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He's talking about tongue weight... Do you know what the tongue weight is on the new one? I think you'll be fine though. My last one was just as heavy or maybe even heavier. Towed fantastic.
 

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Will it really be that close to 10000 lbs and exceeding my tow limits?
A 7000lbs "dry" weight will easily be 8500lbs once you add options and put your stuff in it. The average tongue weight is around 12% of loaded trailer weight which will be 1020lbs (minimum!)

What's the payload of you truck? I'm going to guesss it's around 1600lbs? How much does your family weigh? For example if your family weighs 500lbs together, plus 1020lbs for the tongue weight and another 80lbs for the weight of the hitch you're already at your max payload for the truck and likely close to the rear axle weight rating too. And now you want to add 2 motorcycles, a generator, fuel, ramps.....what's that another 600+lbs? A couple hundred pounds over likely won't hurt anything, but you're pushing it. You need a toy hauler, not a bunkhouse.
 

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I don't see where he mentioned hauling equipment in the bed of the truck too?

Edit I see that now... That's a lot to add to the bed of the truck. toy hauler may be better for your needs. But I'm willing to bet you had all that stuff with the last camper and hauled it like that.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
the last camper weighed 5600 lbs and I had all of the same stuff in it dirtbikes etc. We would love a toy hauler but we dont like any of the open floor plans that they come in. Will this camper really put a strain on my truck and the hitch weight to the point it will mess something up?
 

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You're going to be over payload. If it's the floorplan that you like, look at the Jayco White Hawk 28dsbh rated at 5200 dry and about 5750 shipped from factory. It is the exact same floor plan as the Springdale except for the u-dinette. They have a regular booth dinette and an additional floor to ceiling pantry on that side behind the dinette, and in front of the bunks. My wife and I wanted that floor plan but couldn't find it in something that was going to be within the legal towing limits. We ended up giving up the u-dinette and are actually looking forward to the storage the additional pantry will provide. There are significant changes to the '14 models (higher ceiling, bigger TV, remodeled entertainment center, LED lights standard on awnings etc...), so we ordered one of those. Plus, the White Hawk comes standard with outside fridge.
 

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Will this camper really put a strain on my truck and the hitch weight to the point it will mess something up?
The campers' not really the problem, it's all the extra weight you plan to put in the bed of truck at the same time that is. Being a couple hundred pounds over payload won't really hurt anything but you should be sure to stay under your RAWR and tire rating. I suspect you're going to be way over payload and RAWR.

Tow ratings are a fictional number, never rely on that alone. It's very rare to be able to tow the max without exceeding payload and axle ratings first. The exception would be a boat with only the driver on board as boat trailers have light tongue weights. Same goes for trailer dry weights. Nobody tows an empty trailer.

What you should do is load up the truck with everything that you want to take including the family, bikes etc and a full tank of gas. Take it to the nearest scales and get it weighed. Get weights for the front and rear axles and the combined weight. Subtract full weight number from 7200lbs (GVWR) and that's what you have left in payload for the trailers tongue weight. If you have the trailer already you should load it up and do the same again with it hooked up. I think you may be surprised.

Here's an example of my situation;

'07 Crewmax limited
Truck weight with myself, wife, 2 small kids and full gas = 6440lbs
Front axle = 3560lbs (max 4000)
Rear axle = 2880 (max 4150)
Payload remaining = 760lbs (7200-6440)

Trailer is 32', 6440 delivered weight, 7600 scaled loaded up
Measured tongue weight is 1040lbs. About 80% of that will be placed on the truck (mostly on the rear axle) and 20% gets distributed back onto the trailer with the hitch.

Truck with trailer hooked up;
Front axle = 3490
Rear Axle = 4080
Total = 7570lbs or 370lbs OVER payload but still under the RAWR (barely).

All that is with NOTHING in the bed of the truck!

At minimum upgrade to E rated tires, add airbags and use a good WD hitch. None of that will increase your payload but it will make it safer. Good Luck.
 
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