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Hi! I am new here ..
I just wonder how Tundra ride quality compare to other trucks? Is it stiff?
Me and wife are thinking F150 or Tundra..but she kind worried that Tundra is not compatible.. because I read that Tundra has least comfortable ride.. is that true?
We want a truck as a family hauler..and to do some hunting and taking some roads trips...
Any advice please!
Btw years are for Tundra '14 to '17
If you want a truck with the smoothest ride and will be used for only light hauling, go look at the Honda Ridgeline. I had one of those for a few years and was so impressed by ride, handling, comfort, quietness, etc. The only reason I got rid of it was the 4,000 lb towing limit, so went with a Tundra Limited. It is surprising that the Ridgeline and Tundra double cab have the same bed length and the Honda has that cool under-bed storage compartment. I could carry two dirt bikes, riding gear, camping gear, and gas cans in the bed with the tailgate down and the bed extender option.

I do love my Tundra Limited double cab though. With the bed empty, the ride is choppy. In the winter I add four 50lb bags of sand for extra traction as well and grit to put down if I get stuck on ice. The difference in ride with those sand bags was impressive and now I keep them there year round. One thing of note....DO NOT consider the 4.6 V8! It is an absolute dog compared to the 5.7 V8, and believe it or not, the 5.7 gets better mileage on top of more power and torque! I think this is the last year that the 4.6 will be offered, but don't let a dealer talk you into one.
 

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to the 5.7 V8, and believe it or not, the 5.7 gets better mileage on top of more power and torque! I think this is the last year that the 4.6 will be offered, but don't let a dealer talk you into one.

Sadly the 5.7 V8 will no longer be offered once the new generation Tundra previews late 2022.
 

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Discussion Starter #25
Sadly the 5.7 V8 will no longer be offered once the new generation Tundra previews late 2022.
Well ..depends how reliable that engine will be .. I dont mind reliable turbocharged engine... but yeah it will have more parts ..means more chance to go wrong
 

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Apparently it will be the 3.5 V6 with single or twin turbos. That engine has been used in the Lexus LS-series for the past couple of years, and the non-turbo in several other Toyota models (Camry, Avalon, etc). It may be an acceptable engine in those cars, but I have to wonder how it will perform in a 6,000 lb truck that has the bed loaded and towing a camper....
 

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Toyota should at least keep the V8 as an option, besides the cam shaft leaks, it's been reliable. The Ford Raptor smaller motor has a lot people disappointed. No thanks.
 

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My thinking too. Or are they going after the "candy truck" market, and not designing the for towing.
 

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Ford F-150 body is aluminum. I have heard that this is challenging if bodywork is required after an accident.


I drive a 2008 Tundra DC. First big truck. This Tundra drives like a car. Very comfortable. Powerful engine. Another thing, the turning radius is very tight.
Snow, ice, rain, & road salt ( & throw in a bad ground) are a recipe for bad corrosion of an aluminum body. Probably why Tundras last so long, and Fords don't.
 

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Ford F-150 body is aluminum. I have heard that this is challenging if bodywork is required after an accident.


I drive a 2008 Tundra DC. First big truck. This Tundra drives like a car. Very comfortable. Powerful engine. Another thing, the turning radius is very tight.
As one of my retiree jobs I delivered body parts to collision centers. In the three years of working I know I had delivered approximately ten of them to different places. The body shop guys I would deliver them to said it wasn’t usually worth the aggravation of pulling out the dents and buckles that would occur as the whole panel would be stressed from impacts.
 

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As one of my retiree jobs I delivered body parts to collision centers. In the three years of working I know I had delivered approximately ten of them to different places. The body shop guys I would deliver them to said it wasn’t usually worth the aggravation of pulling out the dents and buckles that would occur as the whole panel would be stressed from impacts.
That’s ten Ford aluminum beds, sorry. PS, I’ve had my 2010 Tundra in to the dealer around 2017 because there are four corners on the bed that are rusting out at weld points. Apparently I’m not the only one with the problem. And, I’ve had a cover on the bed since the beginning.
 

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In my opinion, the judgements about this ride being better than that ride are just opinions. Ride quality and preferences are very person-dependent and so "Consumer Reports said this" or "Car and Driver said that" only go so far.

Earlier posts about making sure you know and experience the ride differences between trim lines are spot on. We bought a Honda CR-V two years ago to replace a totaled Highlander. When we were out test-driving vehicles, we drove top-end trim lines for all that we looked at (Honda, Subaru, Toyota, Hyundai, Nissan). When we got home, wife decided on the Honda, but in a mid-trim line as she had a hard time digesting the added cost for "things she didn't care about." Three months into the buy, she was less than happy because of the ride and other missing amenities, and felt like she's stuck for the next ten years with this vehicle. Her opinion hasn't changed, it's gotten even more so to the bad on this vehicle, and we now have 50K miles on it. We're to the point in our lives where we can easily trade this vehicle out, but she is still reluctant.

Like others, I add tube sand to the back end of my Tundra in winter. The ride evens out some, particularly in the coldest weather. I don't do that for the ride, it's for added traction in the back end. My load is usually about 350 pounts (five 70-pound tubes). I didn't prioritize ride real high when I bought my truck. Reliability was #1 to me, 72" bed minimum, able to fit in the garage was #3, ability to pull 7K pounds easily, four traditional doors. All the rest was available on any brand truck (4WD, etc.). Ride and interior niceties were just yadda, yadda to me. I hvae my preferences, but I'm usually fairly flexible on that kind of stuff.

We all have to prioritize what's important in our choices. If ride is #1 to you, then let that be your guide and make your final decision based on that, tempered with other lower priority items on the list. But base your ride judgement by riding in the trim line you buy.
 
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