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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hi! I am new here ..
I just wonder how Tundra ride quality compare to other trucks? Is it stiff?
Me and wife are thinking F150 or Tundra..but she kind worried that Tundra is not compatible.. because I read that Tundra has least comfortable ride.. is that true?
We want a truck as a family hauler..and to do some hunting and taking some roads trips...
Any advice please!
Btw years are for Tundra '14 to '17
 

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I prefer the ride of my 2016 TRD compared to other brands but it’s something you’re going to have to try for yourself. Everyone has a different idea of what a pickup should ride like. Go for some test drives.
 

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I was looking at a silverado or f250 before buying my Tundra. I didn't like the looks of the f150. The Tundra got a little better gas mileage and after talking to some ford and chevy owners reliability seemed questionable. Also the Tundra's resale value seems higher. The ride is stiffer but not terrible and with a load in the bed mine rides smooth.
 

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Is there a difference in ride quality between SR5 and Platinum trim levels?
Depends on options. Different wheels on the platinum vs sr5 (20" vs 18") and they ride different. The plat and 1794 should ride the same. Now if you add in the offroad package, then the struts/shocks are different, and it will also ride different. Initially in 2010 when I bought my Rock Warrior, I drove a limited and it was super cushy, and I preferred the more stiff Rock Warrior. So drive a few different trucks depending on what trim level and options you are looking at.

Meaning, don't drive a Platinum, then buy an sr5 with the off road pkg, as it will ride different and you may find this out after.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
i heard that SR5 rides softer then Limited
Also tire size has affect too .. higher tires will give softer ride is this correct? Higher i mean height of the tire wall like ..
And for example 4runner Limited has stiffer ride then a SR5 trim ...
 

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Not really in a Tundra. sr5 and plat/1794 should have the same tokico struts, but might have a different spring rate. A platinum or 1794 with 20" wheels will still ride differently than a truck with 18" wheels... There's a lot more to it than just sr5 vs plat etc. If the sr5 has the trd off road package, then it has Billsteins instead of Tokico, and will ride firmer. My plat was super soft and boat like when new, then I swapped everything in the front. A tire with more sidewall will give a softer ride typically, but also a load range E will ride firmer than an equivalent P-metric tire.

Again, there's a lot more to it than just models.
 

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I love the ride of the Tundra's. I have had all SR5's. The 07 DC had the TRD package with the OEM yellow bilstiens. They had a little rear axle hop. I then had an 11 and 12 CM with the black OEM shocks and they both rode well. And I now have a 15 CM with the yellow Bilstien shocks. The 15 does have a little rear axel hop on the highways here, but the highways are rough here.

I have also ridden in a 19 CM SS with the red Bilstien shocks. They did ride rough.

For a smooth ride, go for the one with the 18" wheels and black shocks. The 20" wheels will be a little more stiff but I think you will still like it.

I also like the way the Tundra drives. It is nice and smooth, and it really drives itself (unlike other trucks that you have to really drive to go straight down the road). I also like the stock Michelin tires for a smooth ride. They wear nice and even, stay in balance, and are nice and quiet on the road.

And yes, the resale value of a Tundra in way better than any Ford/Dodge/Chevy. Between the high reliability and the high resale value, it really makes the Tundra the lowest cost truck to drive.
 

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Consumer Reports has said over the last few years that the Tundra ride is stiffer than Ford or Chevy, but I bought the Tundra, because their reader survey (based on repair costs readers have reported) says the Tundra is much more reliable than the other full size pickups. Having driven a couple of F150's for our fire department ( a 2012 and a 2019), I don't see that much difference in the Tundra. It is firmer, but I don't think it is a harsh ride.
 

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If you intend to tow, make sure you confirm that the payload (yellow sticker on drivers door jam) is enough for your needs. I have a 2020 1794 Crew Cab and payload is only ~1200#. Take off the 400# for passengers and 80# for a WDH and the max tongue weight and anything else I want to carry cannot not exceed 720#.
 

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Payload on the Tundra isn't that different from other 1/2 ton trucks. 720 tongue load means the travel trailer weighs about 4,800 lbs (based on tongue load being 15% of trailer weight). tonywelle, you are right about considering what you want to tow with the truck. I see too many 1/2 ton trucks pulling a trailer that is way over recommended loading.
 

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Hi! I am new here ..
I just wonder how Tundra ride quality compare to other trucks? Is it stiff?
Me and wife are thinking F150 or Tundra..but she kind worried that Tundra is not compatible.. because I read that Tundra has least comfortable ride.. is that true?
We want a truck as a family hauler..and to do some hunting and taking some roads trips...
Any advice please!
Btw years are for Tundra '14 to '17
I have the 14' Limited Tundra with the 20' rubber. I really have no issues on ride comfort. I would rather drive my Tundra than my wife's Corolla. Since I use mine to tow my RV trailer, I did switch to the General APT tires which are the all-terrain type, than the OEM Bridgestone's which are more of a highway tire.
IMG_7949.JPG
 

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I love my Tundra, 2010, double cab. Combo work and leisure truck. Only 117K on it and I’ll probably keep it as long as the bed does rust out from the bottom or it will look like an El Camino. But, I have to admit, before the Tundra I had a F150 Lariat, and for long thousand mile rides it was a lot more comfortable for the front and definitely the rear passengers. Everyone complains about the way the rear seats feel after awhile seated. I’ll look first at another Tundra as long as I don’t have to sell my blood plasma weekly to pay for it.
 

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Payload on the Tundra isn't that different from other 1/2 ton trucks. 720 tongue load means the travel trailer weighs about 4,800 lbs (based on tongue load being 15% of trailer weight). tonywelle, you are right about considering what you want to tow with the truck. I see too many 1/2 ton trucks pulling a trailer that is way over recommended loading.
Actually the above information is not correct. The hitch weight max for the Tundra is 980 lbs. Meaning when you hook up a trailer, you can have 980 lbs of "downward" pressure on that hitch. Tundra's (2014-2020) are way below the Big 3. where they average 1100-1300 lbs. When the above statement says "You take 15% of the trailers total weight to come up with the tongue weight. That is just too general of the figure. You can have the "same" length of trailer, one has a 500 dry tongue weight, the other a 1000lb tongue weight. Two things factor into that. #1 if the RV trailer has slides where are they, #2 where are the storage areas in that particular floorplan. Again Tundra's are way behind in total towing capacity. My last RV trailer only had a 400 lb tongue.

My Tundra DC 14' has 9900 lb of towing capacity, where the Big 3 are in the 10,000-13,000 area. As the two pictures below:Current RV A 2018 ORV Timber Ridge RV trailer ( 28'8") has a 840 lb dry tongue weight, and a 6400lb dry weight. Thus my tongue weight was maxing out my Tundra. Had to install Firestone rear air bags to level out the suspension. I'm running with 1200 lb bars on my weight distribution system. Loaded I'm in the 7500-7800 lb area. Yes, the truck knows it is defiantly towing something. My old RV a 2013 Aerolite 400lb tongue and 5800 lb fully loaded. Big difference in how the Tundra towed each. The newer trailer is 2' longer, but also 18" taller.
loaded
IMG_7949.JPG
IMG_5216.JPG
 

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Hi! I am new here ..
I just wonder how Tundra ride quality compare to other trucks? Is it stiff?
Me and wife are thinking F150 or Tundra..but she kind worried that Tundra is not compatible.. because I read that Tundra has least comfortable ride.. is that true?
We want a truck as a family hauler..and to do some hunting and taking some roads trips...
Any advice please!
Btw years are for Tundra '14 to '17
I currently have both trucks and have had good service from both but my F-150 has a more comfortable ride and the blind spot on the Tundra are more pronounce.
 

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I bought a 2018 Tundra Limited 4x4 new. It had a very jarring ride to me. Going over a bump in the road sent a sharp force right into the seat. I pushed a red light and totaled it. I bought a 2019 Ford F150 4 door, 4x4. It has a much nicer ride compared to the Tundra. The rear leaf pack seems stronger on the F150 but the truck as a whole rides much smoother. I have about a 25 mile commute each way.
 

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Hi! I am new here ..
I just wonder how Tundra ride quality compare to other trucks? Is it stiff?
Me and wife are thinking F150 or Tundra..but she kind worried that Tundra is not compatible.. because I read that Tundra has least comfortable ride.. is that true?
We want a truck as a family hauler..and to do some hunting and taking some roads trips...
Any advice please!
Btw years are for Tundra '14 to '17
I had a 2015 F150 Eco boost 2 wheel drive. It was nice and nice ride. I just bought a 2019 Tundra Limited 4 X 4. I love it. It is very comfortable for travel, tows great and is good off-road. The gas Milage is not great about 14 - 15 mpg. But the longevity will be well worth any trade off.
 

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Ford F-150 body is aluminum. I have heard that this is challenging if bodywork is required after an accident.


I drive a 2008 Tundra DC. First big truck. This Tundra drives like a car. Very comfortable. Powerful engine. Another thing, the turning radius is very tight.
 

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Tires have a big effect on ride "smoothness".
The rugged-looking, popular, "off road" tires are usually LT load rated and they ride harsh.
Night & day difference compared to P-metric rated tires.
Paved road use, I would only use P-metric.
If you truly go off-road and risk sidewall damage, etc, from sharp rocks & crap, then LT.
Dont forget that same size LT tires must be inflated substantially higher pressure than P-metric for the same load capacity. That adds to the harshness.

I personally dont understand or relate to the fetish for 20+ inch wheels. Short sidewalls ride harsher and are more at risk for damaged wheels -- scrape a curb, hit an offroad rock, etc)
My 2018 SR5 crew cab has 18", no way would I go 20".
Note Ford Raptors typically have 17" wheels & taller sidewalls.
 
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