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In getting a 4x4, I will have to get a truck with a Flex Fuel 5.7L engine. Is this engine as dependable as the non Flex Fuel 5.7L engine over the long haul?
 

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I wouldn't have it. Mine is non FF, although im sure they are just as dependable, there was an issue were it would get stuck in the E85 Mode. or however they called it.
 

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There is nothing wrong with getting the e85 engine just don't run the stuff. I have one but never will put that junk in my engine. Just as reliable just different ecu. Everything will be fine


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I have the FFV, no issues what so ever, and have never run that crap and never will.
 

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They are just fine..never know when you need to run moonshine. I can make my own fuel here :) I still believe that whenthey start making Ethenol out of corn stalks and leaves it will be cheap fuel..the technology is there it just hasn't scaled up to the corn and sugar yet.
 

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Internally there is no difference. Simply put there is a sensor in the fuel line that changes engine mapping, and all of the fuel delivery confirmation components are different to handle the more corrosive fuel. Toyota still makes non FF but many of the sales regions do not sell them due to government agreements. Which I found out, because when I ordered my 2013 with a blower. You can't put a supercharger on a FF, so my dealer had to setup a trade over 500 miles away to get me a non FF. So in some areas that is what you will have to do to get a non FF.

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You guys don't know much about e85, i run it in mine all the time, the performance gains are surprisingly noticeable, It runs cooler than gasoline and ranges from about 105 to 110 octane, burns cleaner and leaves no carbon buildup on the valves or pistons. I run e85 in my GTO and pick up almost 50 rwhp by doing so.

Don't believe all the BS you hear about e85, Yes it is a moisture magnet but it would take a year of sitting with the cap off to draw in only 1 ounce of moisture. If you have a FF Tundra I suggest you run the tank empty and filler up, turn off the nannies and tear up the tires! :)
 

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The reasons for me not running E85 have more to do with ramifications on our economy. Simply put, ethanol blends under the RFS have made gas prices higher and food prices higher. The truth is ethanol is nothing but a subsidy for big agro business, while costing us more out of pocket. Not only for those reasons, but I dont care to the 25-30% less fuel economy that comes with running E85. Sure it may be cheaper, but its not 25-30% cheaper than a mandatory E10 blend or non ethanol blend. Run ethanol in your race car all you want, but don't support it in being in all of our pumps.

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I don't know about other locations, maybe your fuel is a different blend, but I tried it once and only once in my Sequoia. Yep about 12% less milage, no big deal but significant power loss. That's enough for me to say no.

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E85 is not cost effective, at least not in my area. You lose 12-15% in mileage but around here E85 is usually only about 5-6% cheaper than fuel.
 

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I don't run it for the price, I like the added performance (105 to 110 octane) and the cleaning it provides. I know that the percentages don't work out as a cost effective solution, but again I use E85 leisurely.

Please don't sell it short over the politics, it's a great race gas and beats having to use a meth setup.
 
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I thought e85 ran hot, hence the special engine requirements

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The only difference between my truck and yours is injectors, fuel pump, fuel pump bucket and the flex fuel (tune) added to the ECM.

E85 requires more fuel because it burns much cooler which allows more fuel and air into the cylinder.
 

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Need to inject more fuel when running on E85. IIRC it has a higher oxygen content, which is part of why it was stipulated in the first place (going back to the early 80's and oxygenated fuels--MTBE was otherwise used). I suspect the exhaust coming out would indicate the same "richness" factor, IOW running at 14.7:1 (give or take); but the raw amount of fuel into the engine changes. Normally the ECU monitors, well, everything, to see if anything is amiss. If suddenly it has to inject in twice as much fuel in order to stay at 14.7:1, it can surmise that something is broken (well, hopefully it can do that). Not only that, but under full throttle, when it needs the most fuel, E85 needs to flow more fuel through the injectors, again requiring at least the injectors to be different.

Ethanol is more corrosive, but given how E10 is the norm today I'm not entirely sure that the fuel system (outside of raw flow) has to change. Or it shouldn't, had it be designed properly in the first place... Really, IMO it comes down to the fuel map, and the timing map. Need to inject more fuel in, and you can tolerate more timing, thus the ECU has to change maps.
 

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Need to inject more fuel when running on E85. IIRC it has a higher oxygen content, which is part of why it was stipulated in the first place (going back to the early 80's and oxygenated fuels--MTBE was otherwise used). I suspect the exhaust coming out would indicate the same "richness" factor, IOW running at 14.7:1 (give or take); but the raw amount of fuel into the engine changes. Normally the ECU monitors, well, everything, to see if anything is amiss. If suddenly it has to inject in twice as much fuel in order to stay at 14.7:1, it can surmise that something is broken (well, hopefully it can do that). Not only that, but under full throttle, when it needs the most fuel, E85 needs to flow more fuel through the injectors, again requiring at least the injectors to be different.

Ethanol is more corrosive, but given how E10 is the norm today I'm not entirely sure that the fuel system (outside of raw flow) has to change. Or it shouldn't, had it be designed properly in the first place... Really, IMO it comes down to the fuel map, and the timing map. Need to inject more fuel in, and you can tolerate more timing, thus the ECU has to change maps.
Thanks Brah, I really didn't want to get that technical but I appreciate you doing so.
 

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It looks like the government is going to pass E15 requirements. Total horse sh*t, but get ready for even higher gas prices and food prices, with even worse fuel economy than the E10 blends most of us have to run now. There is a website called pure-gas.org with lists of stations that offer ethanol free gas. However, I think there is only a few gas stations in all of Texas that offer ethanol free gas.

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The only difference between my truck and yours is injectors, fuel pump, fuel pump bucket and the flex fuel (tune) added to the ECM.

E85 requires more fuel because it burns much cooler which allows more fuel and air into the cylinder.
Sending unit and switching module also. I've started a parts list to see what all needs to be changed to run a non ffv Ecu so it can get flashed
 
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