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I noticed a whining sound starting to develop somewhere in my back end about a week ago... sound increases in pitch as I accelerate and maintains pitch while accelerator is depressed to maintain speed but as soon as I let off the gas it's gone. Sound starts somewhere around 15-20 mph and increases in pitch until I coast, then "winds" down as I brake.

I took my rig to my mechanic today, we discussed possible causes and decided to have him service the rear differential. He changed the fluid and gave it a good looking over and couldn't ID any problems. Alas, no change in the sound. Is this possibly a transmission issue? U joint? I'm stumped.
 

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If your machanic couldn't tell you what was wrong y probably need to replace him first. Then have someone take a look at the rear diff
Actually, I don't think any insult to you was intended; Your description of the noise sounds like the old classic diagnosis for gear problems in the differential (noise under accel/decel load, none while coasting). Your mechanic should know that. He may not be telling you the worst case, and "hoping for the best" by changing the gear oil, but "servicing" the diff is likely a "band-aid" if it helps at all. I would get another "professional" opinion. :(
 

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Is your wife or girlfriend sitting in the backseat when you hear this? >:D
 

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My truck has a growling sound on very light use, as in going 55 on flat highway, or upon deceleration from 80 to 70. Sounds like a bad bearing. I put it on the lift this morning so I could run the truck at ride height wheels off the ground and sure as hell is growls like a terribly bad bearing. I suppose the next step is to pull the third member, but the bearing kits run in the $600 - $1500 for 4 stupid bearings and some shims. By the time you spend another $600 on wheel bearings, I am thinking its time for a Currie 9".
 

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Did you localize the noise to the differential, or near the wheel? A bearing kit with four bearings and shims sounds like a differential rebuild kit.

Typically, having to replace one wheel/axle bearing on one side would not mean the other side has to be replaced as well. The other side may continue to run fine for years. A trick you may be able to use when replacing bearings is to take the old bearing to an industrial store specializing in bearings...if they can match the number imprinted on the bearing, then it will be identical to the OE bearing in all respects, and maybe a little cheaper than a replacement from the dealer. American-made bearings such as Fafnir, SKF, Timken were once the best bearings in the world...I'm not sure all those brands even exist any more. Japanese manufacturers would be the best choice today,
 

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Did you localize the noise to the differential, or near the wheel? A bearing kit with four bearings and shims sounds like a differential rebuild kit.

Typically, having to replace one wheel/axle bearing on one side would not mean the other side has to be replaced as well. The other side may continue to run fine for years. A trick you may be able to use when replacing bearings is to take the old bearing to an industrial store specializing in bearings...if they can match the number imprinted on the bearing, then it will be identical to the OE bearing in all respects, and maybe a little cheaper than a replacement from the dealer. American-made bearings such as Fafnir, SKF, Timken were once the best bearings in the world...I'm not sure all those brands even exist any more. Japanese manufacturers would be the best choice today,


Update to my problem:

I found a video on youtube of a guy who put a gopro on the axle, same sound I had. His video he states he swapped the axle to a junkyard version. Then once done his next video played, and it appeared to be the same, but in the comments he said he changed the u joint. It was posted a month after the first. My guess is he swapped axles, but did not help. I figured with 85k miles on my truck I could change the u joints and see. Well it worked. Much smoother. I only did the transmission and axle u joint, I want to change the carrier bearing, and you have to take apart the middle joint to do that.

Side note to it all, I wanted to change the carrier bearing, and wanted to keep it toyota. It is about $180 online. With some digging I found a few things. If you go to Autozone, or another chain they list the same aftermarket bearing for 2000 to 2010. I confirmed this on multiple sites. I found the spicer part number for the 2000 - 2005 bearing as 211750-1X. If they are all the same, I am thinking I am going to order this one for $62 plus shipping and try. I will call the place to see if they know if it fits, but if it does it will save a lot of money.

Not sure if it is appropriate to post links, but I do not work for these guys so delete the link is the mods don't like it.


Spicer 211750-1X Dana Toyota Tundra 2000-2005 Center Bearing - Drivetrain America


I would love some feedback if anyone else has tried it.
 

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@COmtnkid303 my 2016 CM has been making very similar noises to what you described. I just got it back from my dealer where they replaced the rear differential gears. Found some slight discoloration on a few of the gear teeth, but nothing obviously wrong. Also don't feel insulted by the comments on changing the rear end gear oil. Used to be folks who had rear end problems and were selling their rig would put heavier gear oil and sawdust in the rear diff. Sound went away and unsuspecting buyer ended up with an unexpected repair. So ask questions if he used heavier oil, could likely mask the sound, if same weight oil then is the noise still there. Good luck
 
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