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2015 SR5 CrewMax 4x4 I usually notice the shuddering when exiting the freeway or when I have to rapidly brake in freeway traffic. I replaced the rotors and the brake pads, which felt good for about a week. Then I had to brake heavily in traffic later during the same week and the shudder is still there. It bothers me only a little bit, totally frustrates my wife when she drives "feels like the truck is shaking apart"
I have taken the Tundra in for an alignment, that didn't do anything for the shuddering. Whats the cause? Tie rods, bearings, control arm bushings...
I appreciate all of the advice you can provide.
 

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Did you replace all 4 rotors and pads or just the front. It's possible that the other set is warped?

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Only the front ones. Can't imagine how the rears would shake the steering wheel the way it does.
 

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I replaced all 4 wheels at the time of alignment. Shuddered before the wheel replacement and after.
 

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Yep. I let a shop align my newly installed, by me, Complete Ft End, just to see it how close I had it done & #s as done on a New Hunter Rack.
1st time letting a new unknown shop touch my ride in 12 years.
They impact drove them down in circular pattern to over 160 lbs/ft...on New Reman OEM 17" Rims/Bigger Tires. Also, having new Camber Sets in I put a tiny paint pen mark by my final preadjustments.
They didnt move any of them...
I drove in Riding like a New Lexus. Drove out with major vibration shudder.
10 hrs on hot blacktop waiting to get screwed and couldn't watch them 'operate'.
It was a scam shop operated.

So much for that Lexuslike ride.

Always Run Away if you smell that Rat.
 

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Yep. And most shops just crank the lugs on at 120-160+ lbs/ft.
I just got my new rims, rotors, calipers and pads screwed by a Ripoff Alignment scam shop.
The Brand New Top Tier Hunter Alignment Rack was all for show.
It made me sick as had just rebuilt entire front end/Suspension/Self Align & had it running like a Brand New Truck but just felt it important to see before/after specs and dial it in to perfect.
I secret marked my Camber Sets. They never even touched them. And used the glue on Wheel Balance Weights, which began flying off as I pulled out of Scam Shop with whole front end about to shake apart...
I was almost attacked when I returned next day by shop's thugs.
I've been over everything and did find my caliper slide pins needed smoothing/replacing and pads/calipers were seizing against rotors suddenly.
Not sure if their torqueing to over 160 lb/ft in circular pattern did it all in, but sure seemed it.
 

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You need to start with the basics. Make sure the hub surface is clean and rust free before you put the rotors on. Also where the wheel meets the surface of the rotor must be clean and free of corrosion. After that, tighten your wheels up with a torque wrench. Also make sure that your calipers are functioning properly and there is not a piston stuck in its bore causing one side of the rotor to stop the truck.

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Yes. All the above.
Also thought it might have bad ft bearings as well, but not at all upon pulling oads and giving a Wheel On spin.
Free as a bird.
(Turn it up)

As I had done it all except caliper rebuild/new pins, which I cleaned/sanded down & brake grease lubed properly. Upon Vibrations Inspections found Driver Side Caliper with frozen pistons which I got free; as temp move, and is functioning well under my limited use since Rona came to town.
Now have new rotors/pads & rebuild kit. Just need to get new pins.
All will be done soon so can safely make that ULA ReLaunch in a couple few weeks.
Thanks!
 

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All good points. One thing to consider:
Even new rotors, OE or aftermarket, can still be somewhat warped. I had similar issues on my 2011 CM at 90K miles and replaced rotors & pads with aftermarket parts from Napa. They still vibrated. Had wheels & tires checked, calipers, bearings, you name it. A friend told me about a shop near me that only worked on Toyota & Lexus so I brought it there. The owner worked for Toyota for 15 years and has been in business for another 10. Certified by Toyota and so on. He told me that for years he fought this from time to time with OE and aftermarket parts. He said that so many are manufactured that there will be some pass QC that shouldn’t. He learned through another dealer that even when they replace the rotors, that they should be mounted to the vehicle then ground in, while mounted to the vehicle, with special machinery made for this service. He said that he never had an issue with rotors after that.
You can take it with a grain of salt but after he ground mine down and put OE pads on it, it drove like it should.
I recently had him do the brakes on my 2015 CM 4x4 and it is perfect.
Good luck on yours.
 

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2015 SR5 CrewMax 4x4 I usually notice the shuddering when exiting the freeway or when I have to rapidly brake in freeway traffic. I replaced the rotors and the brake pads, which felt good for about a week. Then I had to brake heavily in traffic later during the same week and the shudder is still there. It bothers me only a little bit, totally frustrates my wife when she drives "feels like the truck is shaking apart"
I have taken the Tundra in for an alignment, that didn't do anything for the shuddering. Whats the cause? Tie rods, bearings, control arm bushings...
I appreciate all of the advice you can provide.
 

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Don’t know if this may be the problem but it happened to me after my replacement. I finally found out it was all the rust and dirt that attached to the front brake sensors. They are magnets so they attracted all the old metal pieces. I removed the sensors, used a small magnet and slowly turned each rotor while placing the magnet down the sensor holes. I was amazed of the stuff that was built up on the ends of the sensors. Sprayed them down with brake cleaner and it solved the problem. At least for me.
 

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A couple things. Do carefully torque the front wheel lug nuts. The Tundra is sensitive to brake vibration if the nuts are not torqued right. You may even want to torque them, and then drive it, and then re-torque them. Also, you might put a little lubrication on the studs as you do this (take a nut off, lube it, torque it, move to the next nut, etc). I know you technically are not supposed to lubricate the studs, but any corrosion you have there might be screwing with the actual clamping force of the nut. DON'T over torque them after you lubricate them. You will be exceeding the factory torque just be lubricating them, but a little is OK here. The rule of thumb is that you deduct 10% of the torque if you use lubrication, and you can do that, but you will not damage anything by going to the full rated torque either. The main point is to get the toque very even.

Also, if the rear rotors are warped, then can cause the brake fluid pressure to pulsate and cause a steering wheel shake. Typically, if the steering wheel is shaking, it is front rotors that are warped, and if the seats shake, it is the rear rotors that are warped, but it is not a fool proof method of diagnosis.

You may have to have all 4 rotors turned to get everything flat and then carefully torque the lug nuts and see what you have from there.

Last, to prevent warped brakes, whenever you do a high speed stop, or a heavy load stop, don't really stop. Stop a little short and let the wheels slowly turn so the rotors cools evenly. If you just stop, the brake pads hold heat in the rotor where they are touching while the rest of the rotor cools, and the rotor warps. The faster the stop, the heavier the load, the dramatically higher temps the rotors reach, the more it warps. So just let the truck slightly roll so the rotor cools evenly, and you won't warp a rotor again. I started doing this with my 2002 F-150, and have not ever had to turn or replace a rotor for 18 years.

The drilled hole rotors help, heavy duty rotors help, etc. But if your goal is to extend the life of your brakes and rotors, don't stop fast, avoid high speed stops (from above 55 mph), and when you do have to stop fast, or do a high speed stop, let the rotors cool evenly by just letting the truck slightly roll. You will be amazed at the difference this makes.
 

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2015 SR5 CrewMax 4x4 I usually notice the shuddering when exiting the freeway or when I have to rapidly brake in freeway traffic. I replaced the rotors and the brake pads, which felt good for about a week. Then I had to brake heavily in traffic later during the same week and the shudder is still there. It bothers me only a little bit, totally frustrates my wife when she drives "feels like the truck is shaking apart"
I have taken the Tundra in for an alignment, that didn't do anything for the shuddering. Whats the cause? Tie rods, bearings, control arm bushings...
I appreciate all of the advice you can provide.
My truck did same thing. Apparently common on second and third gen trucks. The cure - replace your front calipers with every brake job. Calipers can stick and recreate the warp all over again. Recut your rotors to get them true again. Swap calipers out and re-bleed fronts. Helped me.
 

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I've had the OP problems on every Tundra I've owned (as well as my current '11 Sequoia). I've gone through all the suggested things - including replacing with high-end drilled/cross-cut rotors. None of it would keep the high-speed braking vibration at bay for more than a few thousand miles. I finally resolved it by carefully torquing as described above after the last rotor replacement (more than 7k miles ago) and the problems have not resurfaced.

First, make sure the problem is with the front. Simple way to check is a) is the vibration felt in the seat, or the steering wheel, or both. If the vibration is absent from the steering wheel, it is probably the back brakes/e-brake. And b) apply the e-brake while driving at highway speeds. Press once just far enough to hear the first ratchet click (no braking is applied at that point). Then release, and carefully press more forcefully the second time - this will release the lock but at the same time allow you to press as hard as necessary to feel the grabbing of the shoes in the rear drums. If you feel no vibration doing this, it's likely not related to the rears.

Now, the thing that killed all of my rotors was over-torquing by tire shops. Whether alignments, new tires, balancing, or rotation, even when I explicitly ask them to use a torque wrench and not exceed 98fl/lb (the spec for aluminum wheels), when I get home to verify, they all require above 150fl/lbs to break loose.

What happens when the wheels are over-torqued is that it spring loads the rotor. While they're technically not warped, since they're 'sprung', as you drive and they heat up, they will deform due to the over-torquing. That will create unevenness and run-out. As the rotor rubs the brake pad (without you even applying the brakes) some brake material is deposited on the rotor (or rotor material is worn down) resulting in permanent high and low spots. As the rotor cools, the problem seems to resolve.

With your next DIY service, get most of the weight off the wheel and break all lugs (finger) loose. Then, using a torque wrench (even a cheapy $20 from Harbor Freight is better than nothing), crank them down to no more than 98ft/lb in a star pattern (every other lug). Once at the proper torque, move to the next. This will eliminate further rotor damage due to the abrasion caused by the over-torque. If you already have significant deposits or erosion, you may need to replace the rotors again.

There are additional things you can do to make sure the rotors are fit properly to the hubs (i.e. clean them), as well as check them for run out using a cheap run out gauge from Amazon ($50). If done properly, the rotors should spin on the hub with less than +/-0.002" run-out. If you find more than that, you can rotate the rotor by one lug and retest. In most cases, you can find a spot where the run out on the rotor counteracts any run out on the hub, negating the need for shims. This sounds complicated, but it's actually quite easy and inexpensive to do.

In my case, I was able to get the run-out to less than +/-0.002" when I installed my new rotors. Combined with the proper torque settings, I've yet to experience the pulsation. Recently I had the tires balanced in FL (ahead of a 700 mile trip back home to TN) and the monkeys in the shop STILL overtorqued them. I couldn't check till I got home in TN, but immediately put them back to where they should be. Still no pulsation, so I think I dodged a bullet.
 

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I've had the OP problems on every Tundra I've owned (as well as my current '11 Sequoia). I've gone through all the suggested things - including replacing with high-end drilled/cross-cut rotors. None of it would keep the high-speed braking vibration at bay for more than a few thousand miles. I finally resolved it by carefully torquing as described above after the last rotor replacement (more than 7k miles ago) and the problems have not resurfaced.

First, make sure the problem is with the front. Simple way to check is a) is the vibration felt in the seat, or the steering wheel, or both. If the vibration is absent from the steering wheel, it is probably the back brakes/e-brake. And b) apply the e-brake while driving at highway speeds. Press once just far enough to hear the first ratchet click (no braking is applied at that point). Then release, and carefully press more forcefully the second time - this will release the lock but at the same time allow you to press as hard as necessary to feel the grabbing of the shoes in the rear drums. If you feel no vibration doing this, it's likely not related to the rears.

Now, the thing that killed all of my rotors was over-torquing by tire shops. Whether alignments, new tires, balancing, or rotation, even when I explicitly ask them to use a torque wrench and not exceed 98fl/lb (the spec for aluminum wheels), when I get home to verify, they all require above 150fl/lbs to break loose.

What happens when the wheels are over-torqued is that it spring loads the rotor. While they're technically not warped, since they're 'sprung', as you drive and they heat up, they will deform due to the over-torquing. That will create unevenness and run-out. As the rotor rubs the brake pad (without you even applying the brakes) some brake material is deposited on the rotor (or rotor material is worn down) resulting in permanent high and low spots. As the rotor cools, the problem seems to resolve.

With your next DIY service, get most of the weight off the wheel and break all lugs (finger) loose. Then, using a torque wrench (even a cheapy $20 from Harbor Freight is better than nothing), crank them down to no more than 98ft/lb in a star pattern (every other lug). Once at the proper torque, move to the next. This will eliminate further rotor damage due to the abrasion caused by the over-torque. If you already have significant deposits or erosion, you may need to replace the rotors again.

There are additional things you can do to make sure the rotors are fit properly to the hubs (i.e. clean them), as well as check them for run out using a cheap run out gauge from Amazon ($50). If done properly, the rotors should spin on the hub with less than +/-0.002" run-out. If you find more than that, you can rotate the rotor by one lug and retest. In most cases, you can find a spot where the run out on the rotor counteracts any run out on the hub, negating the need for shims. This sounds complicated, but it's actually quite easy and inexpensive to do.

In my case, I was able to get the run-out to less than +/-0.002" when I installed my new rotors. Combined with the proper torque settings, I've yet to experience the pulsation. Recently I had the tires balanced in FL (ahead of a 700 mile trip back home to TN) and the monkeys in the shop STILL overtorqued them. I couldn't check till I got home in TN, but immediately put them back to where they should be. Still no pulsation, so I think I dodged a bullet.
Excellent analysis and 'brake'down!
 

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... you might put a little lubrication on the studs as you do this (take a nut off, lube it, torque it, move to the next nut, etc). I know you technically are not supposed to lubricate the studs, but any corrosion you have there might be screwing with the actual clamping force of the nut. ...
Antiseize compound is ideal for wheel studs... reduces risk of corrosion & galling, provides a little lubricity when reinstalling nuts, and eventually forms a thin, long lasting, dry film.
The silvery-gray, aluminum-graphite antiseize eliminates the slight risk of galvanic corrosion, compared to copper-based antiseize.
 
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