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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Here's the front half of my earlier DIY on rear brakes.
Please also read the "BRAKING POINTS" PDF at the bottom of this first post! It contains a TON of great information!

Set the parking brake, break the lug nuts loose, then raise and support the front end with jack stands.

Remove the front wheels. This is what you will see.



Remove the wire retainer that secures the pins and the spring that separates the brake pads.











Remove the rubber cap and connect a bleed container to the bleeder screw. Insert a flat screwdriver or brake spoon between the rotor and the old brake pad. If you are reusing the old rotors, be careful not to gouge them. Open the bleeder and pry the brake pad toward the caliper. Once the caliper piston is fully depressed, insert a small piece of wood (or something to hold the pistons in place) between the rotor and the brake pad. Pry the other brake pad away from the rotor to compress the other half of the caliper.





Remove the brake pads from the caliper.





Unbolt the bracket that secures the brake line to the spindle and remove the clip that holds the hard line to the bracket. This allows more movement of the caliper without pulling on the wheel speed sensor wiring. You want to avoid bending the hard brake line to move the caliper.







Remove the 2 bolts attaching the caliper to the spindle. Remove the caliper and suspend it with a wire coat hanger or secure it on top of the lower control arm so it can't fall. Do not allow it to hang from the brake hose or wheel speed sensor wiring.



Remove the old brake rotor by inserting bolts into the provided threaded holes in the rotor. Alternate tightening the bolts until the rotor is free. You may need to use a plastic dead blow hammer to help break it loose.







If you are replacing the rotor, compare the old part to the new rotor to be certain the replacement rotor is correct.



Clean the new rotor with brake cleaner and a paper towel. Don't use a shop rag.



Clean the hub with a wire brush to remove corrosion. If there is a dimple left by the bolt we used to remove the rotor, be sure to file flat any raised spots.





Apply a very light coat of antiseize to the hub where the rotor meets the raised part of the hub. Don't apply anything between the flat part of the hub and rotor.



Locate the threaded holes on the new rotor and clock them to the same position as the marks left on the hub. Make sure the marks in the hub line up with the threaded holes in the rotor so that if there is any imperfection or rust in that area, it will not keep the rotor from properly seating against the hub.





Install the rotor and thread on one lug nut finger tight to keep the rotor in place as you attach the caliper.



Clean the caliper where the brake pads ride with a wire brush and apply a light coat of brake caliper grease to the 8 flats.



Reinstall the caliper and torque the bolts. IIRC, the proper torque is 74ft lbs.(thx for looking that up for me, Rockstate)



Reattach the brake line bracket and clip.





Apply brake caliper lube to the back of the brake pads to help eliminate vibrations which we hear as squeaks.



Install the brake pads into the caliper. Clean the pins that secure the brake pads with a wire brush and apply a thin coat of silver antiseize to them. Install the pins into the caliper and through the holes in the brake pads. Don't forget to reinstall the spring on the lower pin as you install it.



Reinstall the retaining wire spring through both pins and secure the center into place.









Repeat for the other side.



Reinstall the wheels and torque them. I highly recommend avoiding air tools on these trucks to avoid killing the rotor. Hand install and hand torque the wheels.



Check and top off the master cylinder with DOT3 brake fluid. Pump up the brakes using short slow strokes. Long strokes can send the master cylinder plunger into unused territory. On older cars with some corrosion in the bore, this can cause master cylinder failure. Recheck the brake fluid level and road test. I recommend retorquing the wheels after driving it a while.

 

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Thanks Socal for taking your time to make us a write up.

Question, how are the Centric rotors holding up in the rear?
I been looking and there seems to be different "levels" up to "platinum" Centric Rotors, which did you get? And pads? I got the green HAWKS, are those any good?
 

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Excellent writeup Socal, as always! Two questions for ya if you don't mind:

1) If only replacing the rotors, is it still necessary to remove the pads and/or compress the pistons?

2) Is there a tool or other method that can be used to compress the pistons in order to remove the pads other than opening the bleed screw as you showed?
 

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great write-up -- thanks for putting this together! i always like to know what i'm getting into before diving into a project on a new vehicle.

quick question: are the rear brakes any different or pretty much the same?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
Thanks Socal for taking your time to make us a write up.

Question, how are the Centric rotors holding up in the rear?
I been looking and there seems to be different "levels" up to "platinum" Centric Rotors, which did you get? And pads? I got the green HAWKS, are those any good?
I used the cheap rotors in the rear, but went with premium in the front because the fronts are so incredibly prone to warping. The rear rotors are doing great. I think I have about 8,000 miles on them already. Hawk makes good pads, but people need to be aware of how high performance pads work. Most true high performance pads use compounds that perform best at higher operating temps. Many Hi Perf pads don't perform as well cold as they do hot. I would contact Hawk directly for characteristics concerning their different compounds.
Excellent writeup Socal, as always! Two questions for ya if you don't mind:

1) If only replacing the rotors, is it still necessary to remove the pads and/or compress the pistons?
Usually the new rotors will be just a bit thicker than the old ones and will require that the pistons be partially pushed back in. There are tools that press them back in after removing tha caliper. If you don't do it for a living, it may not be worth the $$ to buy a tool. To minimize damage to the friction surface, you can remove the pads and turn them around backwards while you compress the caliper pistons with a coupke "C" clamps or large "Channel-Lock" style pliers. Since we have 4 pictons per caliper on the front, it can be a bit cumbersome. Just take your time and be careful not to overextend the wheel speed sensor wiring or brake hose. :)
2) Is there a tool or other method that can be used to compress the pistons in order to remove the pads other than opening the bleed screw as you showed?
It's not absolutely necessary to open the bleeder. Slowly compress the piston and the fluid will be forced back toward the master cylinder. I don't condone doing it this way because debris and contaminated fliud is pushed out of the caliper and back into the lines. The worst fluid in the system will be in the calipers because that's where the heat is. This is a great time to get rid of it.
great write-up -- thanks for putting this together! i always like to know what i'm getting into before diving into a project on a new vehicle.

quick question: are the rear brakes any different or pretty much the same?
Ask and you shall receive. :D
http://www.tundratalk.net/forums/tundra-diys/100285-rear-brake-job-w-new-rotors.html

...
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
I had a phone discussion with a fellow TT member this morning and wanted to share some more info here. Hopefully it will help people choose a brake pad combination that fits their needs and add some background for doing a proper brake job.
Here's a link to Bendix tech info. There is a pulldown tab under "tech corner" that opens up tech videos and FAQs. They are directed toward businesses, but the info there applies to anyone wanting to learn more about how to do a brake job and some ins and outs of brake pads, lubrication, friction compounds, etc.
Bendix :: Tech Corner : Training Videos

Here's a pdf of the front brakes from Toyota that includes torque specs...
 

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Great write up. I have a question. When I take delivery of my '12 Tundra in early Jan., I want to paint all 4 calipers. I think I will use G2 caliper paint. From what I have read most have suggested completely removing the calipers and spraying them to get complete coverage. I know this will require bleeding all of them but I want it to look good and last a long time. Do you have any suggestions for me on this project. Also I note you said you had done another writeup on rear brakes. Where can I find that so I know what I am getting into on the rear?
 
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Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
Great write up. I have a question. When I take delivery of my '12 Tundra in early Jan., I want to paint all 4 calipers. I think I will use G2 caliper paint. From what I have read most have suggested completely removing the calipers and spraying them to get complete coverage. I know this will require bleeding all of them but I want it to look good and last a long time. Do you have any suggestions for me on this project. Also I note you said you had done another writeup on rear brakes. Where can I find that so I know what I am getting into on the rear?
http://www.tundratalk.net/forums/tundra-diys/100285-rear-brake-job-w-new-rotors.html

Actually, you can do a really good job with the calipers unbolted, but still attached to the truck hydraulically...especially if you do it before it has any miles on it. I would support both axles and remove all 4 wheels. Unbolt the calipers and hang them from a piece of wire while you tape the area off. Tape off the entire area around the calipers. You don't want overspray on anything. Tape off the lines leading to the calipers and support the calipers from the inside (where the brake pads live) with a piece of 2x4 braced against the ground. You can nail a piece of plywood to the bottom to give it some stability. At the shop, we used muffler stands, but you probably don't have a lift anyway. Clean and dry them thoroughly with brake cleaner to get all the dust and any residue off the calipers. Spray them and let them dry. Turn them over after they are good and dry, then touch up any areas you may have missed. Be patient and don't get in a hurry.
This saves you from having to bleed them and removes the possibility of getting brake fluid on the fresh caliper paint when you do bleed them. On a brand new car that doesn't require a lot of cleaning before paint, I would do them on the truck.
If you don't have a lot of experience bleeding brakes, you should have a shop pull the calipers to paint them if you really want to go that route. They will likely have a scantool with ABS bleed capability.
 

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Alright leaving them on it is. I really didn't want to pull them. Thank you for the suggestions on getting the painting done. I was thinking the same thing, do it when it is new. Only problem, I think the G2 instructions are not to do it below 50 degrees F. Days that warm, in January, in Oregon are rare and the sucker is to big to fit in the garage. I'll think of something but they will get done ASAP. I am going to order the G2 tomorrow.
 
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Alright leaving them on it is. I really didn't want to pull them. Thank you for the suggestions on getting the painting done. I was thinking the same thing, do it when it is new. Only problem, I think the G2 instructions are not to do it below 50 degrees F. Days that warm, in January, in Oregon are rare and the sucker is to big to fit in the garage. I'll think of something but they will get done ASAP. I am going to order the G2 tomorrow.
Seems like we charged $127.50 to mask off and paint calipers when I worked in PB. If you could find a shop to do it for that, I think it would be worth it just to stay warm. (It's almost always above 50 here) :D
 

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Seems like we charged $127.50 to mask off and paint calipers when I worked in PB. If you could find a shop to do it for that, I think it would be worth it just to stay warm. (It's almost always above 50 here) :D
It was 26 here this morning and there was still ice on the lawn all day. I am going to Alaska for 9 days 2 weeks from today. Who's idea was that for God's sake? Oh yeah, it was mine. I haven't had Christmas with my daughter and her family for 6 yrs. Their neighbor has a new Tundra Platnum though. I can get the G2 kit from Tire Rack for I think it was $36. If I need to I'll rent a big tent and put one of those forced air constrution heaters in it but those calipers will get painted within the 1st week of having that truck.
 
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It was 26 here this morning and there was still ice on the lawn all day. I am going to Alaska for 9 days 2 weeks from today. Who's idea was that for God's sake? Oh yeah, it was mine. I haven't had Christmas with my daughter and her family for 6 yrs. Their neighbor has a new Tundra Platnum though. I can get the G2 kit from Tire Rack for I think it was $36. If I need to I'll rent a big tent and put one of those forced air constrution heaters in it but those calipers will get painted within the 1st week of having that truck.
I have an aunt who lives in Fairbanks. I used to have one that lived in Anchorage, too. That one moved to KC. Post up pics of your caliper paint job.
So you did you hawks pads in the front?? What type of rotors??
Centric Posi-Quiet pads all the way around. (not extended wear) Premium Centric rotors up front. Service grade rotors in the rear.

I don't recommend performance brake pads or slotted/drilled rotors for daily drivers.
 

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I will take pics. I can't wait till this truck gets here. My daughter lives down the street from Sarah Palin. We rented a 5 bedroom log house up in the mountains somewhere though. I have never been to Alaska so this will all be new to me.
 

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Where did you get the bolts for the threaded holes in the rotor?
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Where did you get the bolts for the threaded holes in the rotor?
I'm a car guy. I have TONS of odds and ends laying around. I believe the bolts you are looking for are 8x1.25. They only need an inch or so of threads.
 

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Just for my curiousity - - How many miles are ya'll getting on your stock pads?? Do you recommend replacing rotors on initial brake job.... even if theyre in good shape? My local dealer wants $200 for a front pad job!! ....... They said today I should have no problem getting at least 50,000 miles out of mine. 45,500 now.....
 

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There is no reason to replace the OEM rotors unless they are gouged / warped / thin. Suggesting otherwise is just another attempt to push up parts and labor costs. Just slap on a new set of pads and you are done.
 
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